[SOLVED] Did I Brick My RTX 3090?

Jan 10, 2022
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Before I get started, please accept my apology for being a first timer here. I know it's not a good look. I remember casually contributing to this community when I built my first PC a few years ago. I was unfortunately not able to retrieve my account details. Hats off to anyone in this community for being extremely helpful all the time.

PC
MSI Optix G24C6 24 Inch Curved Monitor
MSI Optix G24C6 24 Inch Curved Monitor
Intel Core i9-11900F, 8x2.5 GHz (Rocket Lake)
Inno3D RTX 3090 iCHILL X4, 24GB GDDR6X, 3x DP, 1x HDMI
Corsair Hydro Series H100x (240mm)
Corsair Vengeance LPX 64GB Kit, DDR4-3200 MHz (4x16GB), CL16
ASUS PRIME Z590-P, Sockel 1200, ATX, Z590
Samsung 980 PRO NVMe 500GB M.2 PCIe 4.0 SSD
Samsung 980 NVMe 1000GB M.2 PCIe 4.0 SSD
MSI MPG A850GF, 850W, 80+ Gold, Modular
ATX-Midi Fractal Design Define 7 Black TG

My prebuilt had arrived a few days ago and I was able to get everything working smoothly with my dual screen setup. I started actively using my computer yesterday and played a few games.

Everything was working fine today until I very lightly hit the case with my knee. My two screens, connected to my graphics card with two DisplayPort cables, started flickering for a second or two and then shut down. I happened to be on video call with my friend and I was still able to hear her while my two screens were off. She had told me that my camera frame froze until I disconnected and that she couldn't hear me.

My friend, who works for a prebuilt manufacturer, believes I accidentally bricked my card due to static shock and that cards like mine are extremely sensitive. This worries me. I also don't believe my card was running too hot at the time.

I have tried
-restarting my computer
-turning off the power supply and unplug all cables; then replugging all cables and turn on the power supply
-replugging the DisplayPort cables
-unplugging the DisplayPort cables and connect one monitor using the HDMI port on the graphics card
-letting my computer rest for a few hours and retried the above

I kept getting "DP No Signal" on both screens.

When I turn on my computer, the graphics card seems to be working fine.

The prebuilt manufacturer covered the HDMI ports connected to the motherboard with a sticker that instructs me to use the ports on my graphics card to connect monitors. I tried the HDMI port on my motherboard anyway and got the same prompt ("DP No Signal" which is weird because it's HDMI). Basically I can't get any screens to turn on at all. My peripherals do work.

This is stressful because I will probably never get my hands on one of those cards again.

I would greatly appreciate any help. If you need more information, please let me know.
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
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Thanks for the replies.


I finally figured it out. I reseated all power connectors to the video card and, again, it seemed like it worked until it didn't. It can't be the power connectors.


Thank you, very helpful. I did seat the card in the second x16 PCIe slot but it didn't work. I'm tired of trying new things out. At this point I'm dying to RMA my card but I fear I might have overlooked something and the issue may not even be the card. Thoughts?
When you move the card to the second x16 slot you will typically have to change the slot configuration in bios (and/or jumpers on some boards). Because there are usually less PCI lanes available than slot space you will have to make the second slot have the full x16 available, which it won't usually be by default. Your card probably won't work until it is software set.

From everything you are describing you have a connection issue going on. That is either a PCI header on the motherboard, a bad power header on the gpu or a bad monitor cable. The reason it works for a little bit when you reseat things is because the movement you are causing inside the case is closing the open circuit just long enough let it work and drive you nuts. I would be seeking warrantee from your builder as something was marginal before you kneed it. Unless you football punted this thing, which it doesn't sound like you did, the bump just exposed the existing problem. Unless it is just a bad cable everything else is still a mechanically broken part.
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
Have you tried reseating the gpu? Unplugging from the motherboard and reinstalling? It could just be misaligned following the knock. If you have never done this before there will be a locking clip on the motherboard and at least one screw at the back.
 
Reactions: RodroX

DRagor

Illustrious
Kicking your PC is not a way you want to treat it ... I've done that too though. In my case some cables got loose and was causing problems. So your first move should be to open side panel and check each and every connector to make sure all are firmly attached (while PC is powered down of course).
Besides that, are we talking one of those GPUs with four fans? If yes, those things are heavy. Be extra careful if trying to reseat it.
Btw your CPU is F version so no matter what you do you will not get display from motherboard HDMI port.
 
Reactions: RodroX
Jan 10, 2022
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Have you tried reseating the gpu? Unplugging from the motherboard and reinstalling? It could just be misaligned following the knock. If you have never done this before there will be a locking clip on the motherboard and at least one screw at the back.
Not yet. I'm weary though. The builders very tightly connected the graphics card to the motherboard. I don't know if I trust myself enough to reinstall my card unless I run out of options.

Kicking your PC is not a way you want to treat it ... I've done that too though. In my case some cables got loose and was causing problems. So your first move should be to open side panel and check each and every connector to make sure all are firmly attached (while PC is powered down of course).
I checked the connectors and everything seems to be in place (for the better or the worse).

Besides that, are we talking one of those GPUs with four fans? If yes, those things are heavy. Be extra careful if trying to reseat it.
Three large fans at the bottom, one small fan in front.

Btw your CPU is F version so no matter what you do you will not get display from motherboard HDMI port.
This makes a lot more sense. Thank you.

Try resetting the cmos on your motherboard and reboot
If I reset the CMOS on my motherboard, do I still need a display to reconfigure settings? I might try this before reseating my card but I don't want to mess up further.
 
Jan 10, 2022
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Update: I suppose reseating the graphics card is my only option. I can't reach the CMOS battery or jumpers without taking out the graphics card and I need a working graphics card to get some sort of display (Intel Core i9-11900F chip).

If this doesn't work, I guess I'm sending it in for RMA. Am I out of options?
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
That is a big card.
Depending on how hard this was 'kneed', I think I would question how much stress was put on the PCIe slot, or the end of the card that sits in said slot.

Your motherboard has a 2nd slot. Did you try the card in this slot yet?
 
Reactions: RodroX
Jan 10, 2022
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Update: My displays turned on after attempting to boot my system one last time before packaging it for RMA and I was able to use my system normally! Maybe I had wiggled the card just enough while trying to dismount it (unsuccessfully). I don't know exactly what caused it to work.

As soon as I moved my computer back into place, however, the displays stopped working. I tried getting it to work the same way I got it to work earlier but no luck. The power supply cables are too tight for me to dismount the card by myself so I'm not going that route. Clearly my card still works, I just don't know how to get it working again. Any tips, tricks, or suggestions are greatly appreciated!
 
Jan 10, 2022
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Update: Reseated my card in the same PCIe slot a second time and everything seemed to work after plugging the necessary cables back in and booting the system. I took a moment to enjoy a working computer and so I refused to reboot the system to see if it had actually worked.

A few hours in, upon launching Red Dead Redemption 2 and being on the menu screen for a few minutes, both my displays shut down again. I had not made physical contact with my computer since plugging in the cables. I checked the temperature on my computer and the video card and everything seemed fine. I still don't know the cause and how to help it.

Before successfully reseating the card in the same PCIe slot, I had tried to seat it in the second/bottom PCIe slot but I feared it was too close to the bottom of the case. The bottom fans have minimal space to blow out the heat. Am I overthinking it and should I just seat my card in the bottom PCIe slot? If not, what are my options here? I appreciate all your help.
 
Jan 10, 2022
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Update: I seated the card in the second PCIe slot (16 lanes), plugged the necessary cables back in, and booted the system a few times—nothing. I guess this is it and I should RMA the card, wait infinite amounts of time, and pray that it works after all is said and done. /cry

When reseating the card, I did notice my CMOS battery looking like this. I checked the motherboard manual to confirm what it's supposed to look like and it's not this. I don't know if this is normal and in any way related to my video card issue or harmful to my computer any other way. Can somebody clarify?

 
It does look like it's inserted a bit crooked, but it looks like a normal CMOS battery holder to me. It's also being held in place by the clip at the bottom. Checked the manual as well, but can't find anything out of the ordinary.
 
Personally, I doubt "lightly" hitting the case would cause this type of problem unless some other pre-existing problem already existed. I've got to imagine all the rocking you do just removing the PC in order to re-seat the card is putting just as much if not more stresses on the components. And even a good knock to the external case isn't going to generate an internal static shock unless everything wasn't grounded properly to begin with.

Given the PC does appear to work though, something in graphics land isn't right.

My initial thought reading this was that the PCI-E power connectors may have been knocked loose; when you reseated the card did you also reconnect the power connectors, or did you leave them connected to the card the entire time? If you haven't reconnected them, I'd recommend doing that before anything else.

Also, while this doesn't sound like a SW issue, updating to the latest drivers generally doesn't hurt.
 
Jan 10, 2022
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It does look like it's inserted a bit crooked, but it looks like a normal CMOS battery holder to me. It's also being held in place by the clip at the bottom. Checked the manual as well, but can't find anything out of the ordinary.
I hope you're right. I don't think the angle did justice to how crooked it actually is. Considering it was covered by the graphics card, I thought maybe it got pushed out of place. Thanks!

Personally, I doubt "lightly" hitting the case would cause this type of problem unless some other pre-existing problem already existed. I've got to imagine all the rocking you do just removing the PC in order to re-seat the card is putting just as much if not more stresses on the components. And even a good knock to the external case isn't going to generate an internal static shock unless everything wasn't grounded properly to begin with.
Thank you so much, this is extremely helpful. And you're right. The second time my displays shut down I wasn't even near the case.

Given the PC does appear to work though, something in graphics land isn't right.

My initial thought reading this was that the PCI-E power connectors may have been knocked loose; when you reseated the card did you also reconnect the power connectors, or did you leave them connected to the card the entire time? If you haven't reconnected them, I'd recommend doing that before anything else.
I left the power connectors plugged in when reseating. I initially tried to unplug them but I can't figure out how. There doesn't seem to be a clip that allows me to detach the power connectors easily and securely. If that's common, do I just add more force?

Also, while this doesn't sound like a SW issue, updating to the latest drivers generally doesn't hurt.
I was on the latest Nvidia drivers when my displays had turned on for a few hours yesterday. I doubt it's that.
 

AstelZero

Prominent
Feb 8, 2020
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I hope you're right. I don't think the angle did justice to how crooked it actually is. Considering it was covered by the graphics card, I thought maybe it got pushed out of place. Thanks!


Thank you so much, this is extremely helpful. And you're right. The second time my displays shut down I wasn't even near the case.


I left the power connectors plugged in when reseating. I initially tried to unplug them but I can't figure out how. There doesn't seem to be a clip that allows me to detach the power connectors easily and securely. If that's common, do I just add more force?


I was on the latest Nvidia drivers when my displays had turned on for a few hours yesterday. I doubt it's that.
Try replacing the cables from monitor to your graphics card, it may sound weird but years ago this happen to me too but with a different graphics card (but it was big). No display or anything. I thought I bricked my GPU, I tried everything, but at the end tech dude told me to replace the HDMI cables and it worked fine ever since.
 
I left the power connectors plugged in when reseating. I initially tried to unplug them but I can't figure out how. There doesn't seem to be a clip that allows me to detach the power connectors easily and securely. If that's common, do I just add more force?
Huh, there should be a latch, at least for the 6-pin/8-pin connectors. I'd definitely re-seat those connectors before doing anything else; if one of them isn't set right its possible the knock jarred one of them loose and even small vibrations may cause power interruption to the GPU if the connectors aren't set properly.
 

jasonf2

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Oct 11, 2015
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From what you are describing the PCIe header is suspect as well. If there is a second x16 slot and you can get it to fit I would try to install it on that header. More likely than not you will have to reconfigure the PCI lane config on the motherboard, but if that is the case you are probably in an RMA anyways. Big cards shipped in place can cause mechanical failures on motherboards under the header (intermittent opens on broken solder) that are really difficult to diagnose. When they happen wiggling it will sometimes make it work, until it moves around a bit due to thermal stress or vibration then it goes open again.
 
Jan 10, 2022
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Thanks for the replies.

Huh, there should be a latch, at least for the 6-pin/8-pin connectors. I'd definitely re-seat those connectors before doing anything else; if one of them isn't set right its possible the knock jarred one of them loose and even small vibrations may cause power interruption to the GPU if the connectors aren't set properly.
I finally figured it out. I reseated all power connectors to the video card and, again, it seemed like it worked until it didn't. It can't be the power connectors.

From what you are describing the PCIe header is suspect as well. If there is a second x16 slot and you can get it to fit I would try to install it on that header. More likely than not you will have to reconfigure the PCI lane config on the motherboard, but if that is the case you are probably in an RMA anyways. Big cards shipped in place can cause mechanical failures on motherboards under the header (intermittent opens on broken solder) that are really difficult to diagnose. When they happen wiggling it will sometimes make it work, until it moves around a bit due to thermal stress or vibration then it goes open again.
Thank you, very helpful. I did seat the card in the second x16 PCIe slot but it didn't work. I'm tired of trying new things out. At this point I'm dying to RMA my card but I fear I might have overlooked something and the issue may not even be the card. Thoughts?
 

AstelZero

Prominent
Feb 8, 2020
20
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510
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Thanks for the replies.


I finally figured it out. I reseated all power connectors to the video card and, again, it seemed like it worked until it didn't. It can't be the power connectors.


Thank you, very helpful. I did seat the card in the second x16 PCIe slot but it didn't work. I'm tired of trying new things out. At this point I'm dying to RMA my card but I fear I might have overlooked something and the issue may not even be the card. Thoughts?
Try a different monitor maybe? It's your fault for kicking the pc, I really doubt RMA will give you anything and just void the whole warranty, but if it's not been 14 days yet since the purchase, then go with RMA?
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
615
153
11,390
64
Thanks for the replies.


I finally figured it out. I reseated all power connectors to the video card and, again, it seemed like it worked until it didn't. It can't be the power connectors.


Thank you, very helpful. I did seat the card in the second x16 PCIe slot but it didn't work. I'm tired of trying new things out. At this point I'm dying to RMA my card but I fear I might have overlooked something and the issue may not even be the card. Thoughts?
When you move the card to the second x16 slot you will typically have to change the slot configuration in bios (and/or jumpers on some boards). Because there are usually less PCI lanes available than slot space you will have to make the second slot have the full x16 available, which it won't usually be by default. Your card probably won't work until it is software set.

From everything you are describing you have a connection issue going on. That is either a PCI header on the motherboard, a bad power header on the gpu or a bad monitor cable. The reason it works for a little bit when you reseat things is because the movement you are causing inside the case is closing the open circuit just long enough let it work and drive you nuts. I would be seeking warrantee from your builder as something was marginal before you kneed it. Unless you football punted this thing, which it doesn't sound like you did, the bump just exposed the existing problem. Unless it is just a bad cable everything else is still a mechanically broken part.
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
Jan 10, 2022
12
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10
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When you move the card to the second x16 slot you will typically have to change the slot configuration in bios (and/or jumpers on some boards). Because there are usually less PCI lanes available than slot space you will have to make the second slot have the full x16 available, which it won't usually be by default. Your card probably won't work until it is software set.

From everything you are describing you have a connection issue going on. That is either a PCI header on the motherboard, a bad power header on the gpu or a bad monitor cable. The reason it works for a little bit when you reseat things is because the movement you are causing inside the case is closing the open circuit just long enough let it work and drive you nuts. I would be seeking warrantee from your builder as something was marginal before you kneed it. Unless you football punted this thing, which it doesn't sound like you did, the bump just exposed the existing problem. Unless it is just a bad cable everything else is still a mechanically broken part.
I'm afraid you're right. It's beyond the graphics card. I need to ship back the system and pray nothing else breaks if or when they fix it. It worries me, though.
 
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Sorry to revive this thread. I got really busy and was not able to do much since.

I realized I had a working GTX 1070 laying around my parents house so I went and picked it up. Would there be any issues if I replaced the RTX 3090 with the GTX 1070 in the same PCIe slot without making any changes? I believe it should be fine but I'm not sure.

If I do that and it works, that would mean the issue is most likely the RTX 3090. I would only have to RMA the graphics card and avoid taking risks with shipping an entire system.
 

DRagor

Illustrious
Would there be any issues if I replaced the RTX 3090 with the GTX 1070 in the same PCIe slot without making any changes?
Since 3090 works when it works I don't think there is a chance 1070 will suffer any bad fate. It should be safe to do the swap. But see below ...
If I do that and it works, that would mean the issue is most likely the RTX 3090. I would only have to RMA the graphics card and avoid taking risks with shipping an entire system.
If 1070 works fine you could exclude motherboard from suspect list. However, since 1070 uses much less power then 3090, such test would not let us say that its 100% faulty GPU as we have to consider possible problem with power delivery.
 
Reactions: RodroX and Phaaze88
Jan 10, 2022
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Update: Sent in the previous card for RMA. I got sent a new card (unopened, Inno3D) which had arrived this morning. I have been using my old GTX 1070 in the meantime and everything was working fine. When I replaced the GTX 1070 with the brand new RTX 3090 earlier, the same issue persisted. Everything turns on except for both monitors plugged into the card.

At this point, I am >90% sure it has nothing to do with the card(s) either and everything to do with... something else. But not the display port cables, not the motherboard, and not the power cables. What could it possibly be, or what is my next best option? I also just wonder if this has happened to anyone before.

I presume many of you will think it's a power delivery issue but 850W should be plenty for one card (750 is recommended for RTX 3090 cards). The manufacturer would not be selling custom builts with a 3090 and 850W PSU if this was a common issue.

Thanks again and please, ;-;
 

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