[SOLVED] Did I fry my CPU?

Dec 1, 2018
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Hey all,

Today I started removing my ryzen 2600 stock cooler to replace it for a new/better one. When I unscrewed and disconnectrd the cooler and started pulling, it wouldn't come off. So applied a bit more force and it came off along with the processor stuck to it.

Did some research about how to remove a stuck processor from the heatsink and saw a website saying it was okay to soak the processor+heatsink in isopropyl alcohol. Did that, didn't work. Tried heating the heatsink with a hairblower, carefully so it wouldn't blow on the cpus capacitor, didn't work.

Then, I gave moving/twisting the cpu from the heatsink another try, and ended up bending one of the pins. My heart skipped a beat.

I carefully unbent the pin and gave up on trying to remove the cpu from the heatsink. I waited a few minutes for the alcohol to dry off before reconnecting. But when I put the cpu back in the motherboard, screwed and connected the stock cooler, my pc won't start. The components light up, the cpu stock cooler spins, but there's no image and the peripherals get no signal.

Was it completely stupid of me follow the instruction of soaking everything into alcohol? Or did I just not wait long enough for it to dry? I don't think it's the pins, cause the cpu fits right in the little wholes, no force needed.

Is there anything I could try to revive the cpu? Please help :/
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Submerging in isopropyl isn't going to hurt it, but depending on the volume it might take a bit longer to fully evaporate.

As for removing a 'stuck' heatsink, your best bet is to run the chip for a few minutes, let it warm up. At that point, shut down the system (and disconnect power) and then remove the heatsink. The heat from running should've returned the TIM to a more manageable state.

As for the system itself, have you cleared the CMOS?
 
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Hey, thanks for replying.

So one thing I forgot to mention. After the pc didn't turn on, I went to remove the cooler+processor combo and, weirdly engouh, it came off without the cpu chip. I removed to see if the pins were okay, and everything looks fine.

No, I did not clear the CMOS. Should I just pop out the little battery off and put it in again?

From what I've said, do you think it's really dead? :/
 
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I see.

It's late here now, tomorrow I'll try clearing the cmos and whatever solutions I can find. This is so frustrating.

Thanks for the help!
 

compprob237

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I see.

It's late here now, tomorrow I'll try clearing the cmos and whatever solutions I can find. This is so frustrating.

Thanks for the help!
Are you lifting the latch for the CPU socket, installing the CPU, and re-latching? That might be a source of the problem. When you reinserted the CPU with it still attached to the cooler you effectively jammed the pins into the locked socket and there's a chance this damaged it. It's not likely but there's a chance. Just make sure to follow the motherboard's instructions for installing a new CPU and you should be OK. It's typically: Lift latch, install CPU following orientation markings, lower latch, latch in place, and then install cooler.

I agree with @Barty1884 that soaking in Isopropyl was a very bad idea. First off, before you try what I'm about to explain make sure that the CPU is oriented in such a way so it wont drop to the ground once its free since it can be very sudden. So, for both of these methods I'd have the heatsink on a table, fan side down with the CPU pins facing up. Blow a hair dryer on the heatsink itself until it's ~43C (110F) to soften the thermal paste and then try to slide the CPU parallel to the heatsink surface until it comes free. If that doesn't work I'd then try a flat-head screwdriver and GENTLY pry near a corner of the CPU. Essentially, the CPU's stuck to the heatsink like a suction cup on a window and you have to overcome that suction before it frees the CPU. Sliding the CPU over will usually expose part of that "suction cup" to air and free the CPU but gentle prying can work too (try to slide first). I say gently here with the intention of a very small amount of force being applied. If it doesn't feel like it will come free then don't apply more force. I don't want you to return to the forum with a CPU that has broken substrate.
 
Reactions: mormoretti
Dec 1, 2018
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Are you lifting the latch for the CPU socket, installing the CPU, and re-latching? That might be a source of the problem. When you reinserted the CPU with it still attached to the cooler you effectively jammed the pins into the locked socket and there's a chance this damaged it. It's not likely but there's a chance. Just make sure to follow the motherboard's instructions for installing a new CPU and you should be OK. It's typically: Lift latch, install CPU following orientation markings, lower latch, latch in place, and then install cooler.

I agree with @Barty1884 that soaking in Isopropyl was a very bad idea. First off, before you try what I'm about to explain make sure that the CPU is oriented in such a way so it wont drop to the ground once its free since it can be very sudden. So, for both of these methods I'd have the heatsink on a table, fan side down with the CPU pins facing up. Blow a hair dryer on the heatsink itself until it's ~43C (110F) to soften the thermal paste and then try to slide the CPU parallel to the heatsink surface until it comes free. If that doesn't work I'd then try a flat-head screwdriver and GENTLY pry near a corner of the CPU. Essentially, the CPU's stuck to the heatsink like a suction cup on a window and you have to overcome that suction before it frees the CPU. Sliding the CPU over will usually expose part of that "suction cup" to air and free the CPU but gentle prying can work too (try to slide first). I say gently here with the intention of a very small amount of force being applied. If it doesn't feel like it will come free then don't apply more force. I don't want you to return to the forum with a CPU that has broken substrate.
Hey, thanks for replying too!

Yeah, at first, when I reinserted the CPU for the first time, I hadn't lifted the latch. Then I realized the pc wasn't turning on, removed it again and then I noticed the latch factor. So then I lifted the latch, inserted the chip and closed it. Didn't work either.

As I said, the two are not stuck anymore; when I removed the cooler for the second time, it came off without the processor.

Now I left the processor sitting on my table in case it wasn't completely dry before (I really think it was). Tomorrow I'll keep trying.

Thanks for the help!
 
Reactions: compprob237

compprob237

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Hey, thanks for replying too!

Yeah, at first, when I reinserted the CPU for the first time, I hadn't lifted the latch. Then I realized the pc wasn't turning on, removed it again and then I noticed the latch factor. So then I lifted the latch, inserted the chip and closed it. Didn't work either.

As I said, the two are not stuck anymore; when I removed the cooler for the second time, it came off without the processor.

Now I left the processor sitting on my table in case it wasn't completely dry before (I really think it was). Tomorrow I'll keep trying.

Thanks for the help!
Well, crossing my fingers here that it works tomorrow. Hopefully the drying time plus resetting the BIOS (removing the battery) like @Barty1884 said does the trick!
 
Reactions: mormoretti
Dec 1, 2018
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Yeah, I'd start by removing the battery.

As for "dead", I wouldn't expect so - at least provided it appeared that the alcohol had evaporated.
That being said, there are no guarantees. 'Soaking' the CPU to remove the cooler really was a horrible recommendation.
Hey, so today I cleaned the thermal compound from the chip and heatsink, applied new one, all while the cmos battery was out. Reinserted the battery, but now the motherboard won't turn on at all, it flashes for a split second and that's it.

I'm looking at how to clear the cmos with the jumper cables, but it seems my mobo doesn't have them. There are just two pins next to the cmos battery. The model is a MSI b450 tomahawk.
 
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Well, crossing my fingers here that it works tomorrow. Hopefully the drying time plus resetting the BIOS (removing the battery) like @Barty1884 said does the trick!
Hey, there.
So good news (kinda). I contacted this technician and brought my PC over so he could check/test stuff. It turns out my PSU (3 months use, corsair vs600) got fried during one of the solutions I had tried alone. This completely baffled me, I didn't even think to check the PSU because it was working fine until I tried the CMOS battery thing.

Apparently the mobo and cpu are working fine, but now the problem is the ram: it won't boot if I'm using just my ram, but when we used one of his sticks + one of mine, it booted and the system properly detected both sticks. Did I damage the ram somehow? Is this solvable?

Thanks!
 
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Hey, guys

Okay, let me try to give you a summary:

1- Tried to replace my ryzen 2600 stock cooler, heatsink ended up pulling the cpu chip stuck to it right out of the mobo
2- Tried a few things to release the chip, including soaking everything in isopropyl alcohol, didn't work.
3- Decided to just put the cpu+stock cooler back in the mobo, and the pc wouldn't boot.
4- Tried clearing CMOS removing the battery, and somehow this fried my new corsair vs600 PSU (I know this because I tried with another one and everything turns on, even though it wouldn't boot)

I checked my parts with a friend's system, cpu and mobo working fine, but I can't get a boot with my ram (which was working fine). The strange thing is that, when I use one of my sticks + a different one, I get a boot into windows and the system properly detects both sticks.

Did I fry my ram? I'm guessing (hoping) the system wouldn't detect it if I had. Is this solvable?

I appreciate any help :(
 

compprob237

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Hey, guys

Okay, let me try to give you a summary:

1- Tried to replace my ryzen 2600 stock cooler, heatsink ended up pulling the cpu chip stuck to it right out of the mobo
2- Tried a few things to release the chip, including soaking everything in isopropyl alcohol, didn't work.
3- Decided to just put the cpu+stock cooler back in the mobo, and the pc wouldn't boot.
4- Tried clearing CMOS removing the battery, and somehow this fried my new corsair vs600 PSU (I know this because I tried with another one and everything turns on, even though it wouldn't boot)

I checked my parts with a friend's system, cpu and mobo working fine, but I can't get a boot with my ram (which was working fine). The strange thing is that, when I use one of my sticks + a different one, I get a boot into windows and the system properly detects both sticks.

Did I fry my ram? I'm guessing (hoping) the system wouldn't detect it if I had. Is this solvable?

I appreciate any help :(
First off:
Whoever told you to soak your components in isopropyl alcohol gave you bad advice. I'm saying this so that if someone else stumbles across this post they know that this is a very bad idea.

Sounds like you have a bad stick of RAM. Put in a single stick and try to boot from it. The slot this stick must be installed to is usually the 2nd from the CPU but refer to your motherboard manual to be certain. If the system boots from one stick then try the other stick. If they both work individually then install them properly (Usually slot 2 & 4) and try to boot. If any individual stick wont boot then that stick is bad. If both sticks work individually but both together wont boot then try the sticks in slots 1 & 3. If it STILL wont boot then try the sticks in 1 & 2. If it STILL wont boot, but you know for a fact that both sticks work individually then you have something wrong with your motherboard or CPU.
 
Reactions: mormoretti
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First off:
Whoever told you to soak your components in isopropyl alcohol gave you bad advice.

Sounds like you have a bad stick of RAM. Put in a single stick and try to boot from it. The slot this stick must be installed to is usually the 2nd from the CPU but refer to your motherboard manual to be certain. If the system boots from one stick then try the other stick. If they both work individually then install them properly (Usually slot 2 & 4) and try to boot. If any individual stick wont boot then that stick is bad. If both sticks work individually but both together wont boot then try the sticks in slots 1 & 3. If it STILL wont boot then try the sticks in 1 & 2. If it STILL wont boot, but you know for a fact that both sticks work individually then you have something wrong with your motherboard or CPU.
Hey, thanks for replying.

I have 2x8 sticks, I have only tried one individually and, as I said, it won't boot but it is detected by the system.

However, before I tested my parts with another system, I couldn't get a boot with both the sticks in.

Could both sticks really be bad even though they are detected (at the very least one is detected)?

Thanks!
 

compprob237

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Hey, thanks for replying.

I have 2x8 sticks, I have only tried one individually and, as I said, it won't boot but it is detected by the system.

However, before I tested my parts with another system, I couldn't get a boot with both the sticks in.

Could both sticks really be bad even though they are detected (at the very least one is detected)?

Thanks!
Your system needs only one stick minimum to boot. If it is installed in the proper slot then the system will at least boot to BIOS/UEFI. If it wont boot then try swapping sticks. If neither boot then the kit's dead or something might be wrong with your motherboard/CPU still.

Another problem could possibly be improperly seated RAM. Are you making sure that you're pushing on both sides of the stick as you insert them? It should click in place on both sides of the stick and if you have one of those single latch slots then make sure to give a good push on the latch-less side.
 
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Your system needs only one stick minimum to boot. If it is installed in the proper slot then the system will at least boot to BIOS/UEFI. If it wont boot then try swapping sticks. If neither boot then the kit's dead or something might be wrong with your motherboard/CPU still.

Another problem could possibly be improperly seated RAM. Are you making sure that you're pushing on both sides of the stick as you insert them? It should click in place on both sides of the stick and if you have one of those single latch slots then make sure to give a good push on the latch-less side.
Yeah, I made sure it clicked and the little latches closed.

Just to make sure, you're saying that the reason why I can't get a boot but the ram is actually detected is that there might be something wrong with the motherboard/cpu?
If that was the case, wouldn't it have trouble booting with other ram too? (it doesn't, apparently)

Maybe I can use a different ram stick along with mine to try and configure my sticks to a different frequency or something?

The kit is a 2x8gb G-Skill TridentZ 3000mhz

Thanks!
 

compprob237

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Yeah, I made sure it clicked and the little latches closed.

Just to make sure, you're saying that the reason why I can't get a boot but the ram is actually detected is that there might be something wrong with the motherboard/cpu?
If that was the case, wouldn't it have trouble booting with other ram too? (it doesn't, apparently)

Maybe I can use a different ram stick along with mine to try and configure my sticks to a different frequency or something?

The kit is a 2x8gb G-Skill TridentZ 3000mhz

Thanks!
You need to clarify what you mean here. If you can't boot then the system wont even get to a point where it can be detected. You will just get a BIOS beep code or diagnostic code for a memory problem. If you're getting to at least BIOS/UEFI where you can see the RAM kit then you ARE able to boot with them attached.

If you're able to boot but one stick is not being detected then that stick has a problem.

Have you tried booting from a single stick as I suggested?

You can mix RAM sticks but G.Skill has a lifetime warranty so why not send it for a warranty RMA ("It just stopped working 😇") replacement if there is a problem with them?
 
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You need to clarify what you mean here. If you can't boot then the system wont even get to a point where it can be detected. You will just get a BIOS beep code or diagnostic code for a memory problem. If you're getting to at least BIOS/UEFI where you can see the RAM kit then you ARE able to boot with them attached.

If you're able to boot but one stick is not being detected then that stick has a problem.

Have you tried booting from a single stick as I suggested?

You can mix RAM sticks but G.Skill has a lifetime warranty so why not send it for a warranty RMA ("It just stopped working 😇") replacement if there is a problem with them?
As I said in the post: I can't get a boot using only my sticks. I CAN get a boot using my stick + a different one, in which case both sticks are properly detected.

Unfortunately I live in Brazil and had a friend bring over the ram (and CPU) from the US. There's no G-Skill here, but I'll see if they can help me anyway.
 

compprob237

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As I said in the post: I can't get a boot using only my sticks. I CAN get a boot using my stick + a different one, in which case both sticks are properly detected.

Unfortunately I live in Brazil and had a friend bring over the ram (and CPU) from the US. There's no G-Skill here, but I'll see if they can help me anyway.
I'll do a diagram because I think you're misunderstanding what I'm saying:
CPU | RAM Slot 1 | Slot 2 | Slot 3 | Slot 4
I'm suggesting:
CPU | Empty | 8GB Stick #1 | Empty | Empty
8GB Stick #2 -> NOT IN THE SYSTEM
If this wont boot at all then exchange the sticks so that it's like this:
CPU | Empty | 8GB Stick #2 | Empty | Empty
8GB Stick #1 -> NOT IN THE SYSTEM
If neither of these work then I would like to know what motherboard you have.
 
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I'll do a diagram because I think you're misunderstanding what I'm saying:
CPU | RAM Slot 1 | Slot 2 | Slot 3 | Slot 4
I'm suggesting:
CPU | Empty | 8GB Stick #1 | Empty | Empty
8GB Stick #2 -> NOT IN THE SYSTEM
If this wont boot at all then exchange the sticks so that it's like this:
CPU | Empty | 8GB Stick #2 | Empty | Empty
8GB Stick #1 -> NOT IN THE SYSTEM
If neither of these work then I would like to know what motherboard you have.
I did understand that and I'll try it, I just wanted to know why/how the system can detected my ram when it's paired with a different one, and if that's any sign that my ram has saving :)
 
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OK, paired with that different stick did you try exchanging your sticks to see if it did the same with the other one?
Let me just thank you again for your help and your time, I really appreciate it.

Unfortunately, I only brought one stick over to my friend's house as I did not assume there was anything wrong with the ram, so I didn't test both the sticks.

What I'll do:
1- Try repositioning/switching my sticks just like you said
2- If that doesn't work, I'll try my sticks individually along with my friend's stick.

From your experience, is it still possible that a ram stick is bad even though it's detected by the system? Or should that give me some hope?
 

compprob237

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Let me just thank you again for your help and your time, I really appreciate it.

Unfortunately, I only brought one stick over to my friend's house as I did not assume there was anything wrong with the ram, so I didn't test both the sticks.

What I'll do:
1- Try repositioning/switching my sticks just like you said
2- If that doesn't work, I'll try my sticks individually along with my friend's stick.

From your experience, is it still possible that a ram stick is bad even though it's detected by the system? Or should that give me some hope?
When you test the sticks individually I literally mean only one stick installed in the system.

As for a RAM stick being detected but being bad: Of course I've had that happen many times. Memtest86 showed that it was bad quite quickly. Swapping sticks/booting from single sticks isolated the problem down to which stick died. Two of the three instances that come to mind the bad stick, when installed by itself, wouldn't let the system boot (BIOS beep code for RAM problem) but would show up in the RAM total if it was the second stick (Slot 4) installed. The other example would show up just fine and everything but once the system crossed into using its space I would get a system hard lock. The stick would be bootable by itself but Memtest86 would IMMEDIATELY throw errors with it. All of these kits had lifetime warranties (G.skill, Patriot, Corsair).
 
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I see. Alright then, I'll try my sticks individually and in the positions described in your diagram.

I'll also try booting with my friend's stick + mine (both, individually), shouldn't be a problem, and then run memory tests.

If I can really narrow the problem down to a dead kit or single stick, I'll see what I can do with G-Skill.

I'll let you know after I've done the tests.

Thanks again!
 
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I'll do a diagram because I think you're misunderstanding what I'm saying:
CPU | RAM Slot 1 | Slot 2 | Slot 3 | Slot 4
I'm suggesting:
CPU | Empty | 8GB Stick #1 | Empty | Empty
8GB Stick #2 -> NOT IN THE SYSTEM
If this wont boot at all then exchange the sticks so that it's like this:
CPU | Empty | 8GB Stick #2 | Empty | Empty
8GB Stick #1 -> NOT IN THE SYSTEM
If neither of these work then I would like to know what motherboard you have.
So hey, I tested both sticks individually in the 2nd slot like you said, no boot at all. I just noticed that a red light turns on in the motherboard and, according to the diagram above it, it means that there's something wrong with the CPU. The model is a MSI b450 Tomahawk.

Update: please ignore that, I was so anxious about the situation that I forgot to connect the CPU power cable. I connected it, tried again with both sticks individually, no boot, and the red light on the motherboard debug diagram indicates DRAM. I don't have any other ram available right now, I'll have to wait for my friend to bring his over.
 
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