Question Did I pick the wrong z390?

geekahedron

Distinguished
Jan 22, 2010
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I've just completed a system build, replacing my own computer for the first time since 2009. That build was intended to be future-proof and well outlived my expectations. I'm hoping this build will similarly well, but now that it's assembled I'm having some doubts. I've done other builds for people in the past decade but a lot has changed in the past two or three years that was new for me this time around.

Here is my part list:
CPU: Intel Core i9-990k
Cooler: Corsair H100i Pro
Motherboard: Gigabyte z390 Designare
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series DDR4-2666 (8GB x 2)
Storage: WD Blue M.2-2280 1TB SSD
GPU: PowerColor Radeon RX580 8GB
PSU: Corsair RMx 650W 80+ Gold
Case: Cooler Master MasterCase MC500

With a pair of USB 2.0 ports on the front of the case, and internal USB lighting control for the Corsair cooler and for the lighting node I added, I also installed a NZXT internal USB hub because the motherboard itself only has one USB 2.0 header. That seems pretty common on modern mobos (and some have removed USB 2.0 entirely?), so not a big deal.

Now that everything is together, it's a totally slick build at stock speeds. However, any sort of overclocking I've tried to do on the CPU or the GPU immediately crashes the system. to be fair, I'm not an expert, and I'm not going to push this thing to the brink of falling apart, but I've never had this much trouble just bumping clock speeds, through the Gigabyte EasyTune software or Intel's own Extreme overclocking (the latter works in test mode, then crashes when trying to save changes). I don't know if that's a product of the i9 already being so finely tuned, or some more complicated balancing of CPU and RAM voltages I need to calculate, or some failure of the motherboard itself. It's not running long enough to overheat, anyway, just immediate BSOD.

Of less importance, but still quite annoying, is the RGB controls. It's my first time playing with Corsair's iCue software and I'm quite impressed. What I did not realize beforehand, though, is that the z390 Designare is not supported by RGB Fusion, but has a different "Ambient LED" software that is absolute trash. All other things being equal, that alone makes me wish I'd gone with the Aorus Master instead of the Designare.

Am I overthinking this? Or should I consider swapping the mobo and rebuilding everything to make sure that I'm happy with the system for years to come?
 

cin19

Titan
Moderator
1) For oc cpu, you should try to manually, don't use the software like EasyTune , or Extreme overclocking. You want to read more, make sure uninstall these software too, because your MB has 12+1 power phase VRM, they are good enough for ocing the cpu.

When you google " z390 gigabyte oc guide" you should be able to find the PDF format guide from gigabyte.
Or read this guide too: https://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/intel_core_i9_9900k/
And this review too: https://www.tweaktown.com/guides/8812/gigabyte-z390-9th-gen-oc-guide-vrm-thermal-test/index2.html

2) For oc the GPU, the best software is the MSI afterburner. Here is guide: https://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/overclock-gpu-safely-boost-performance/
You can download the MSI afterburner https://www.msi.com/page/afterburner
Or you can use the AMD software too
Radeon WattMan https://www.amd.com/en/technologies/radeon-wattman/

3) For the RGB software, don't use two, otherwise they will have a conflict. If you like the Corsair's iCue software, then uninstall the gigabyte one.
 
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