Question Did installing a new Graphics cardbreak my computer?

Oct 14, 2020
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I purchased a new MSI Radeon RX570 card with 8gb of memory and installed it into my PCI-E 16 slot on my MSI motherboard with an AMD A3 CPU. I have installed graphic cards on this motherboard without any problems in the past. This time the pc would not boot and showed an error code in MBR file that a file was missing or corrupt. I tried to replace the file from my Windows 10 pro disk without luck. I then tried putting my old graphic card back in which is a AMD GeForce 470 card and I got the same result. I have spent a couple of days trying to fix this error without luck. I have even gone so far as buying a new SSD hard drive and starting a fresh install but the computer will not make it through an install without rebooting and I have to start all over. Frustrating as all hell. Please Help!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Full hardware specifications including EXACT model numbers of all core parts especially the power supply?

Have you tried doing a hard reset of the CMOS since installing the new graphics card?

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Have you TESTED the CMOS battery? Because that board is well more than old enough to have a weak CR2032 by now.
 
Oct 14, 2020
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MSI 785G-E53/65 motherboard, AMD Phenom II 955 Processor X4, MSI Radeon RX 570 8GB memory 256-bit memory bus graphics card (card I tried to instal), Cooler Master EX2treme 725 watt power supply Bios version V3.3 11022009, WD WDBNCE0010PNC-WRSN 1TB hard drive Hope this all helps Thanks for the fast response.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That power supply was an extremely poor quality power supply series as evidenced by this review by Gabe Torres.


And that was 8 years ago. So it's not only not very good, it's extremely old as well. In fact it's five years PAST it's warranty date, but all accounts.

Replacement would be advisable and is quite probably your entire problem. Then again, the entire platform is pretty damn old, so you could certainly have a motherboard failure happening as well, but I'd be pretty surprised if your main problem was anything other than the power supply.

Get a good 550w unit and you'll most likely be back in business.


Of course, if you want to be sure, you can certainly test the unit.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw
 
Oct 14, 2020
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10
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That power supply was an extremely poor quality power supply series as evidenced by this review by Gabe Torres.


And that was 8 years ago. So it's not only not very good, it's extremely old as well. In fact it's five years PAST it's warranty date, but all accounts.

Replacement would be advisable and is quite probably your entire problem. Then again, the entire platform is pretty damn old, so you could certainly have a motherboard failure happening as well, but I'd be pretty surprised if your main problem was anything other than the power supply.

Get a good 550w unit and you'll most likely be back in business.


Of course, if you want to be sure, you can certainly test the unit.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw
I tested my power supply with a multimeter and all the voltages were right on spec according to a wiring diagram I found online. The ps fan and case fans spin when power is applied.
I think my problem might lie elsewhere. Please help.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That motherboard has PCIe 2.0 slots, and while technically the graphics card you have is backwards compatible with PCIe 2.0, it is very doubtful that your board, old as it is, has a BIOS version that supports a PCIe graphics card this new with a very recent architecture unlike anything that was available at the time that board last got a BIOS update.

That board was released in 2009, making it 11 years old, and the last BIOS update for it was in 2011, 9 years ago. Unless you can find verification elsewhere that somebody has successfully used an RX 570 in that specific motherboard, it's about a fifty fifty shot as to whether it even supports it or not. I'm leaning towards, not.

Try flipping the switch on the back of the power supply to the off position (0), unplugging the power supply from the wall, then removing the graphics card. Now remove the CMOS battery for five minutes. During that five minutes press the power button on the front of the case and hold it down for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery. Now install the older GTX 470. Connect any required auxiliary PCI power cables to the graphics card. Plug the PSU back in, flip the PSU power switch on the back of the unit back on, press the power button on the front of the case and see if the system will POST.
 

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