[SOLVED] Did my electric fan kill my RX 570?

AllForAstor

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Apr 15, 2017
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Hi, I have one of those unbranded korean RX 570 cards which I got used in a system that I bought earlier this year.



Recently, my PC wouldn't turn on so I had it checked and it turned out that my GPU died and the PC worked fine after they removed it. I got in touch with some guy who said he could repair it and he actually did; he mentioned that it was most likely shorted or it died from a power surge or something (I just know it had something to do with electricity). After getting it back, I just played games on it throughout the night without any issues at all. The morning after, I was going to play again but it was pretty hot so I plugged in my electric fan in the power strip (which my monitor, speakers, and PC are also connected to) and turned it on. This time, my computer wouldn't power on up until I removed the GPU again. I also noticed that every time I increased/decreased the fan speed, my speakers would make a popping sound (it usually does that only when I power the speakers off) so I'm thinking that maybe my electric fan is the one creating the issue since I can also remember plugging the fan into the power strip before the first time my GPU died.

So do you think the fan is what killed my GPU or is the GPU too busted to work properly again? The guy who fixed it said he'd fix it again for free (but he lives far away) and if the issue is the electric fan, I will just get it fixed again and return to using my RX 570. If the issue is because the card is just too trash, I won't get it fixed anymore and just buy a different branded card instead (but I will most likely have to downgrade since I can't afford something better than an RX 570 at the moment).
 

AllForAstor

Commendable
Apr 15, 2017
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It's because it's a knockoff GPU , NOT BUILT TO THE NORMAL STANDARDS of real manufactures.
So you wouldn't recommend getting it fixed for free and not plugging in the fan? If not then I'm most likely going to end up with a GTX 960 which is a downgrade but at least it's branded. Eitherway, I would still like to know if it's possible that the fan is causing it and if it can affect my future GPU as well.
 

AllForAstor

Commendable
Apr 15, 2017
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I just checked and my power strip is using an adaptor, I forgot to remove it since we moved houses. I'm guessing plugging it without the adaptor would ground the power strip? That's a good thing right?
 

gn842a

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Oct 10, 2016
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I just checked and my power strip is using an adaptor, I forgot to remove it since we moved houses. I'm guessing plugging it without the adaptor would ground the power strip? That's a good thing right?
Yes.

And the RX 500 series even if bought from well established brand company is a very unstable piece of hardware.

I finally solved my RX 580 and RX 590 problems by getting a 1660 TI.
 

gn842a

Respectable
Oct 10, 2016
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I see. Thank you, I might buy a GTX 960/1050Ti then.
Your mileage may vary, as they say. I just know I worked with two RX 590s and one RX 580 and couldn't get them to be stable. But my build works great now that I'm using a 1660 TI. So it wasn't me. There are however people on this forum who are happy with their RX 500 series.

Greg N
 
Mar 19, 2019
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Yes.

And the RX 500 series even if bought from well established brand company is a very unstable piece of hardware.

I finally solved my RX 580 and RX 590 problems by getting a 1660 TI.
Windows is unstable and the ms-nv-intel cospiracy forces you to buy new hardware. IBM, nvidia and intel do everything to prevent the success of the Linux desktop and they do bugs for the AMD hardware intentionally. AMD fights against this with active AGESA updates.

Asus produces high quality PC hardware and the warranty works great. My Asus RX Expedition OC 570 4GB broke after one year of use, got my money back and I did buy Asus Arez Top RX 580 8GB with less money from sales. When you are using a Linux distribution, open source drivers are the way to go if you want to have an easy to maintenance and stable system. No way to fix bugs in closed source nvidia drivers. You can configure the Linux kernel freely and make it stable. You have plenty of kernels and Mesa versions to try.
 
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