Question Disable Internet Access

Dec 15, 2020
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I have an old computer, running Vista, which I only use for ripping/storing my CD and karaoke disc collection. I never use a browser on it, for obvious reasons. I need it to connect to my network so I can upload songs to my NAS (so SONOS can play them). At the moment I just unplug it from the network when I've finishing transferring songs. Is there any way, using Vista, that I can stop it accessing the internet while still being connected to my network? I imagine most people have this problem in reverse!
 

faalin

Judicious
statically assign an ip address

So in the IPv4 properties for example
ip address 192.168.1.20
Subnet 255.255.255.0
default gateway leave blank

Leave DNS records blank as well.

We still have a few XP machines at work and that is all i did, they cant access the internet but can still gain access to the servers for programs. Now we have a cisco meraki firewall and i can block access there but the other way works as well.
 
Dec 15, 2020
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I have an EE router, but I use a Draytek Vigor 2820 firewall as well. There is a way of doing it on the router apparently but it seems rather complicated! Can I assign a static ip to this one pc while everything else still uses DHCP?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
I have an EE router, but I use a Draytek Vigor 2820 firewall as well. There is a way of doing it on the router apparently but it seems rather complicated! Can I assign a static ip to this one pc while everything else still uses DHCP?
Yes, you want to assign the static on the computer, not on the router. You just need to be sure your static IP address is outside the range of DHCP on the router. So check (and modify if needed) the DHCP range on your router.
 

faalin

Judicious
In the router there should be a DHCP range. so if your router is 192.168.1.1 and your DHCP range is 192.168.1.20 -192.168.1.254 set the static IP to 192.168.1.2 thru 19.

If you dont have a network scanner program or if the router doesnt tell you what IP address your devices are using you can always open command prompt and do a ping 192.168.1.* to see if something is on that IP address.
 
Dec 15, 2020
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The DHCP table on my router is reporting ip addresses 192.168.0.10 to 20 in use. If I assign a static ip of 192.168.0.30 would that work without causing problems to anything else, which works fine?
 

faalin

Judicious
Is that the DHCP range 10 to 20 or do you have 10 devices using IP address 10-20? Sounds like your static range should be 192.168.0.1 to 192.18.0.9 and it should be placed between 2 and 9 if nothing is using those IP address's
 
Dec 15, 2020
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My EE router uses 192.168.1.1, my Draytek firewall uses 192.168.01, and I also have an Apple Airport Time Capsule (does the w-fi part as my Draytek doesn't have wi-fi) which uses 192.168.0.10. All the addresses between 10 and 20 have devices using them. Does this mean I can use 2 to 9 for the static ip?
 

faalin

Judicious
it looks like it. log into the Draytek firewall as that is handing out your DHCP addresses. Since your devices are starting off at 10 and going up to 20, i would take a hard guess and say your DHCP pool starts at 10 and goes up to 254. Anything between 2 and 9 should be used for static.
 
Reactions: NigelJ

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Run "arp -a" via the Command Prompt on a few of your computers.

The results will provide some insight as to what DHCP IP addresses and Static IP addresses are in play. The MAC information can also be used to identify the host computers.

Using the netstat command can be even more helpful:

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-use-netstat-command-windows-10

Likewise nmap.

https://nmap.org/

Lastly Powershell has quite a number on cmdlets that can very useful and helpful with respect to finding more about network devices and configuration.

For example:

Get-NetAdapterAdvancedProperty

Results are an concise summary of the host computer's network adapter configuration settings.
 
Reactions: NigelJ
Dec 15, 2020
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My Draytek has identified all my devices, all are between 10 and 20. My EE router (the entry point) identifies my Draytek as 192.168.1.208, but marks it 'unknown device' (which I assume is because it's a firewall?). I will set the static as 192.168.0.7 (7 is my lucky number).
 

faalin

Judicious
Your EE router hands out DHCP, if you have more then 1 lan port on it anything else that gets plugged into it will get a 192.168.1.x IP address. This is why in your router the Draytek gets a 192.168.1.208 number. Once you get to the Draytek it says nope im now handing out IP address and switches to the 192.168.0.x range.

I use Comcast at home and from my router it gives a 10.0.0.x range, once it hits my Ubiquiti Security Gateway it switches everything to a 172.16.121.x range. For my network i have it setup so anything between 1 and 19 is static and then 20 to 254 is dynamic and gets handed out by the Security Gateway.
 

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