[SOLVED] DLSS 2.0 vs Native Resolution

kuba2002.11

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
67
1
1,535
0
My question is, do you guys think DLSS 2.0 quality mode is as good as the native resolution it's trying to create? Let's say. native 1440p vs 720 DLSS
If yes then Nividia is doing God's work giving us 30-40% better performance at no image quality cost.
 
Last edited:

RTX 2080

Prominent
Jun 8, 2020
670
152
690
30
I know it works really well, but would you consider it better looking then the Native Resulution while using the Quality Mode ?
It depends on the game and even on what is happening at the moment in the game.

In some games/scenarios DLSS quality mode will add in detail that doesn't exist at native resolution, such as reconstructing a telephone wire between two telephone poles that was aliased and stair-stepish in the native resolution image.

In other games/scenarios objects shaped in certain ways moving at certain angles will exhibit shimmering artifacts not present at native resolution.

You're asking a simple question, but since its effectiveness is scene-dependent and 'better-looking' can be subjective from person to person, its not as easy to say as you might think. It is my opinion that DLSS 2.0 quality mode usually looks better than native resolution, but there can be exceptions.
 
My question is, do you guys think DLSS 2.0 quality mode is as good as the native resolution it's trying to create? Let's say. native 1440p vs 720 DLSS
If yes then Nividia is doing God's work giving us 30-40% better performance at no image quality cost.
The devil company doing God's work. Are those words of irony?

I will say it works well and is a compelling feature. However 1080p to 1440p or 1440p to 2160p would be a better comparison. But certainly not 720p to 1440p.

Does it create better images than native? No. Nvidia was comparing native with tsaa to dlss without tsaa. Tsaa is a form of time based anti alaising. On old tube tv's it was called a 3d comb filter. Nothing truly remarkable there. While this does reduce alaising with a minimal cost, it makes small details much softer or blurrier.

Other forms of aa take more horsepower like up sampling amd super sampling.But they take more horsepower.

Even if raw rasterization is equal between a 3080 and 5800XT, i would spend an extra $100 to get usable ray tracing and decent dlss 2.0/2.1. AMD is rumored to have their own DLSS tech soon, but without useable rt, its a no go. I consider the 20 series unusable for rt.
 

RTX 2080

Prominent
Jun 8, 2020
670
152
690
30
If DLSS 2.0 is available in the game I'm using, then I 100% will turn it on every time; it works that well.

What you described (720p internal outputting to 1440p) is DLSS performance mode which won't produce as good results as balanced or quality mode. In Control, if your output resolution is 1440p, quality DLSS mode has a 1706x960 internal resolution. This will provide better results visually than performance or balanced mode.

PC Gamer did a great article about testing DLSS 2.0 at a 1440p output resolution. You should read it: www.pcgamer.com/amp/nvidia-dlss-2-performance-benchmarks-control-wolfenstein-youngblood/
 
Reactions: digitalgriffin

kuba2002.11

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
67
1
1,535
0
The devil company doing God's work. Are those words of irony?

I will say it works well and is a compelling feature. However 1080p to 1440p or 1440p to 2160p would be a better comparison. But certainly not 720p to 1440p.

Does it create better images than native? No. Nvidia was comparing native with tsaa to dlss without tsaa. Tsaa is a form of time based anti alaising. On old tube tv's it was called a 3d comb filter. Nothing truly remarkable there. While this does reduce alaising with a minimal cost, it makes small details much softer or blurrier.

Other forms of aa take more horsepower like up sampling amd super sampling.But they take more horsepower.

Even if raw rasterization is equal between a 3080 and 5800XT, i would spend an extra $100 to get usable ray tracing and decent dlss 2.0/2.1. AMD is rumored to have their own DLSS tech soon, but without useable rt, its a no go. I consider the 20 series unusable for rt.
My question came after watching this video
View: https://youtu.be/eS1vQ8JtbdM

The gameplay shown looks better in DLSS quality mode then native In My Opinion
 

kuba2002.11

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
67
1
1,535
0
If DLSS 2.0 is available in the game I'm using, then I 100% will turn it on every time; it works that well.

What you described (720p internal outputting to 1440p) is DLSS performance mode which won't produce as good results as balanced or quality mode. In Control, if your output resolution is 1440p, quality DLSS mode has a 1706x960 internal resolution. This will provide better results visually than performance or balanced mode.

PC Gamer did a great article about testing DLSS 2.0 at a 1440p output resolution. You should read it: www.pcgamer.com/amp/nvidia-dlss-2-performance-benchmarks-control-wolfenstein-youngblood/
I know it works really well, but would you consider it better looking then the Native Resulution while using the Quality Mode ?
 

RTX 2080

Prominent
Jun 8, 2020
670
152
690
30
I know it works really well, but would you consider it better looking then the Native Resulution while using the Quality Mode ?
It depends on the game and even on what is happening at the moment in the game.

In some games/scenarios DLSS quality mode will add in detail that doesn't exist at native resolution, such as reconstructing a telephone wire between two telephone poles that was aliased and stair-stepish in the native resolution image.

In other games/scenarios objects shaped in certain ways moving at certain angles will exhibit shimmering artifacts not present at native resolution.

You're asking a simple question, but since its effectiveness is scene-dependent and 'better-looking' can be subjective from person to person, its not as easy to say as you might think. It is my opinion that DLSS 2.0 quality mode usually looks better than native resolution, but there can be exceptions.
 

kuba2002.11

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
67
1
1,535
0
It depends on the game and even on what is happening at the moment in the game.

In some games/scenarios DLSS quality mode will add in detail that doesn't exist at native resolution, such as reconstructing a telephone wire between two telephone poles that was aliased and stair-stepish in the native resolution image.

In other games/scenarios objects shaped in certain ways moving at certain angles will exhibit shimmering artifacts not present at native resolution.

You're asking a simple question, but since its effectiveness is scene-dependent and 'better-looking' can be subjective from person to person, its not as easy to say as you might think. It is my opinion that DLSS 2.0 quality mode usually looks better than native resolution, but there can be exceptions.
Brilliant answer, thank you
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY