Question DNS error but only on one access point

robashby

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Feb 23, 2014
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I have a main desktop which after a while can not access the internet due to a DNS error. I have to reset the main router and the access point in order for it to get started again. However, when it is down, the other access point in the house still works without issue. In fact the other access point never creates the same issue.

It has always been a an issue (reset every few weeks) but now it is a happening every 30 mins.

Here is the setup to the desktop:
Modem -> router -> access point (2 plugs that use the electrical wiring) -> wired to desktop

Here is the setup to the lounge area:
Modem -> router -> access point (router set up as an access point)

I have read a lot and tried many of the suggested solutions like flushing on command prompt etc. I am actually now wondering if it is a virus on the computer - malwarebytes and windows defender are not picking anything up.

Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.
Thank you
Rob
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Make and model information for routers/access points?

Does your main router present a list of network addresses showing IP addresses and MACs?

How many network devices do you have: wired and wireless?

On your main desktop run and post the results of "ipconfig /all".

Likewise run and post the results of "arp -a".

The access point/router in the lounge: did you disable its' DHCP function?

Did you assign a static IP address to the access point/router in the lounge via the main router and the access point's MAC?

Ensure that that static IP address is outside of the DHCP IP address range allowed to the main router.
 
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robashby

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Make and model information for routers/access points?
D-Link - DSL-2750U is the main router.
TP Link - Av200 Access point for desktop and upstairs wifi (2 plugs)
Linksys - E1000
access point for the lounge

Does your main router present a list of network addresses showing IP addresses and MACs?
Not that can see

How many network devices do you have: wired and wireless?
2 Wired and 10 wireless (only using 4 max at a time)

On your main desktop run and post the results of "ipconfig /all".
When not working



Windows IP Configuration



Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : DESKTOP-K6B0KFV

Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :

Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid

IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No



Wireless LAN adapter WiFi:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : D-Link DWA-525 Wireless N 150 Desktop Adapter(rev.A2)

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : AC-F1-DF-0E-A9-FA

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes



Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 8:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : AC-F1-DF-0E-A9-FC

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes



Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 10:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter #2

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : AC-F1-DF-0E-A9-FD

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes



Ethernet adapter Ethernet:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : D8-50-E6-3B-AF-5F

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::f505:a5ad:3564:9cfc%9(Preferred)

Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.156.252(Preferred)

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 131616998

DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-25-43-52-BF-D8-50-E6-3B-AF-5F

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled


When working

Windows IP Configuration



Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : DESKTOP-K6B0KFV

Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :

Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid

IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : Home



Wireless LAN adapter WiFi:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : D-Link DWA-525 Wireless N 150 Desktop Adapter(rev.A2)

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : AC-F1-DF-0E-A9-FA

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes



Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 8:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : AC-F1-DF-0E-A9-FC

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes



Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 10:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter #2

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : AC-F1-DF-0E-A9-FD

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes



Ethernet adapter Ethernet:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : Home

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : D8-50-E6-3B-AF-5F

DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::f505:a5ad:3564:9cfc%9(Preferred)

IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.3(Preferred)

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : 05 August 2020 18:40:51

Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : 06 August 2020 18:40:52

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 131616998

DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-25-43-52-BF-D8-50-E6-3B-AF-5F

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

192.168.1.1

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled


Likewise run and post the results of "arp -a".
When not working

Interface: 169.254.156.252 --- 0x9

Internet Address Physical Address Type

169.254.255.255 ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff static

224.0.0.22 01-00-5e-00-00-16 static

224.0.0.251 01-00-5e-00-00-fb static

224.0.0.252 01-00-5e-00-00-fc static

239.255.255.250 01-00-5e-7f-ff-fa static

255.255.255.255 ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff static

When working

Interface: 192.168.1.3 --- 0x9

Internet Address Physical Address Type

192.168.1.1 d8-fe-e3-4a-89-b0 dynamic

192.168.1.7 78-28-ca-11-18-5c dynamic

192.168.1.8 78-28-ca-11-1a-e2 dynamic

192.168.1.9 48-a6-b8-31-06-b0 dynamic

192.168.1.11 94-9f-3e-8c-bd-9a dynamic

192.168.1.154 14-cc-20-ce-5d-2a dynamic

192.168.1.255 ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff static

224.0.0.22 01-00-5e-00-00-16 static

224.0.0.251 01-00-5e-00-00-fb static

224.0.0.252 01-00-5e-00-00-fc static

239.255.255.250 01-00-5e-7f-ff-fa static

255.255.255.255 ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff static




The access point/router in the lounge: did you disable its' DHCP function?
DHCP Server Disabled
Internet connection type is DHCP


Did you assign a static IP address to the access point/router in the lounge via the main router and the access point's MAC?
I assigned an ip on the router in the lounge which is acting as an access point. 1 above the range of the main router.

Ensure that that static IP address is outside of the DHCP IP address range allowed to the main router.
Ok I guess I need to check the access point connected to the desktop as I didn't set that one up - a professional did. Will have to try and work out what the ip is on this one.

Does this help isolate the issue?
Thank you for the help.
 

robashby

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Feb 23, 2014
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And slight update, it looks like the ip on the desktop access point is within the max set on the router (It is .154 and the max on the router is 200). Could this be the issue? Maybe it should have been set to 254?

Thanks so much.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I would not increase the DHCP IP address range. Just establish a range limited to the number of network devices plus a few extra DHCP IP addresses for guest devices.

On the main router D-Link what is the current allowed DHCP IP address range?

Starting DHCP IP address - Ending DHCP IP address. (Or the starting DHCP IP address and some number of devices....?)

What static IP addresses have you assigned to the Access Points? Did you reserve those static IP addresses for the access points by using the Access Point's MAC?
 

robashby

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Feb 23, 2014
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I would not increase the DHCP IP address range. Just establish a range limited to the number of network devices plus a few extra DHCP IP addresses for guest devices.

On the main router D-Link what is the current allowed DHCP IP address range?
Main router is 192.168.1.1
Main router has an allowed range of 192.168.1.2 - 192.168.1.200



Starting DHCP IP address - Ending DHCP IP address. (Or the starting DHCP IP address and some number of devices....?)

What static IP addresses have you assigned to the Access Points?
My access point in the lounge is 192.168.1.201
The access point to the desktop is 192.168.154


Did you reserve those static IP addresses for the access points by using the Access Point's MAC?
No, this would be the static IP lease list? I haven't added anything here on the main router.
Thank you
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You are welcome.

Leave the main router at its 192.168.1.1 IP

Use 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.9 for static IP addresses and reserve the IP address via the devices' MAC.

For example the lounge access point would be 192.168.1.2, the desktop access point would be 192.168.1.3.

And yes, lease the static IP via the devices MAC. "Reserved" is sometimes used.

Reference:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/593350/D-Link-Dsl-2750u.html?page=47#manual

Page 47 uses "Static IP Lease". [Do verify that I found the correct User Manual for your D-link router.]

A printer could be 192.168.1.4, a NAS could be 192.168.1.5, and so forth. The D-link User Manual notes a maximum of 32 static devices.

Would not expect that you have a requirement for 32 static IPs.

Use the 192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.25 for the DHCP IP addresses range.

Trusting that:

1) you only need a few static IP addresses

and

2) ending with .25 is a wide enough range for your DHCP devices plus a few extra DHCP IP addresses.

The above is what I do.

One advantage is that you can establish your IP network device by device and, hopefully, not create any IP address conflicts nor allow a conflict to occur. Also makes if easy to note (based on a presented IP address) whether or not the device is configured as static or DHCP.

Limiting the number of DHCP IP addresses also limits the number of devices that can join the network. You should not see any devices outside of the upper end of the allowed DHCP IP address range.

There are other schemes that can be used and I have no problem with other suggestions and ideas that may be offered.
 
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robashby

Honorable
Feb 23, 2014
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You are welcome.

Leave the main router at its 192.168.1.1 IP

Use 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.9 for static IP addresses and reserve the IP address via the devices' MAC.

For example the lounge access point would be 192.168.1.2, the desktop access point would be 192.168.1.3.

And yes, lease the static IP via the devices MAC. "Reserved" is sometimes used.

Reference:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/593350/D-Link-Dsl-2750u.html?page=47#manual

Page 47 uses "Static IP Lease". [Do verify that I found the correct User Manual for your D-link router.]

A printer could be 192.168.1.4, a NAS could be 192.168.1.5, and so forth. The D-link User Manual notes a maximum of 32 static devices.

Would not expect that you have a requirement for 32 static IPs.

Use the 192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.25 for the DHCP IP addresses range.

Trusting that:

1) you only need a few static IP addresses

and

2) ending with .25 is a wide enough range for your DHCP devices plus a few extra DHCP IP addresses.

The above is what I do.

One advantage is that you can establish your IP network device by device and, hopefully, not create any IP address conflicts nor allow a conflict to occur. Also makes if easy to note (based on a presented IP address) whether or not the device is configured as static or DHCP.

Limiting the number of DHCP IP addresses also limits the number of devices that can join the network. You should not see any devices outside of the upper end of the allowed DHCP IP address range.

There are other schemes that can be used and I have no problem with other suggestions and ideas that may be offered.
Great, thanks so much, I will give this a go tomorrow morning (midnight here now). Yes, that is the correct manual.

Just one question. For the reserved static IP addresses, is it worth doing this with all our mobile devices also?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Mobile devices - no.

You could do that on/for a mobile device; however, doing so will probably get in the way sometime, somewhere....

Reason: Sort of an inherent conflict there between the concepts of "static" and "mobile". Not a technical answer I know.

I rely on recognizing mobile devices on my network by their name and/or MAC. Both for family and friends/guests.

And I also use strong passwords that everyone must use to join the network.

People have multiple devices and they also change devices. Keeping the reservations/leases up to date would be cumbersome overall.

Again, I have a printout so it is easy to check if some device suddenly appears via DHCP.

So I will most likely know who and what even if I forget the specific device and MAC.
 
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robashby

Honorable
Feb 23, 2014
14
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10,510
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Mobile devices - no.

You could do that on/for a mobile device; however, doing so will probably get in the way sometime, somewhere....

Reason: Sort of an inherent conflict there between the concepts of "static" and "mobile". Not a technical answer I know.

I rely on recognizing mobile devices on my network by their name and/or MAC. Both for family and friends/guests.

And I also use strong passwords that everyone must use to join the network.

People have multiple devices and they also change devices. Keeping the reservations/leases up to date would be cumbersome overall.

Again, I have a printout so it is easy to check if some device suddenly appears via DHCP.

So I will most likely know who and what even if I forget the specific device and MAC.
perfect thank you. I have set it all up as you suggested and so far so good. Will let you know in a few days! Thanks again for the help. Really appreciate it.
 

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