[SOLVED] Do I need to change the case for the new cpu?

Sep 3, 2019
24
2
15
0
Hi,

I have a h440 case with MA610P aircooler and i7 6700k cpu at stock.

I'm just ordered a new i7 10700 with a clc 280 liquid cooler (I'm planning to install it in the top of the case). The thing is, I'm not sure if the current case is good enough in terms of airflow to cool the new cpu.

With my current cpu, the temp is usually around 66-69 with %90-100 load ( the cpu fan speed is ~%75 when the temp exceeds 65 and it won't go %100 unless the temp is 75)
The max temp I got is 72. But it's under 70 for like %99 of the time.

Do I need a new case in order to cool the cpu or I'm good with the h440?
 
You do not need a new case.
Yours is perfectly good, and it is an excellent case for an air cooler.

Your current cooler is doing a fine job with your 6700K, and I would expect it to perform equally well with a I7-10700K.
My advice is to try your current cooler and see how you do.

If you think heat is a problem, then you can consider upgrading the cooler.
How you mount a aio radiator is a bit of catch22.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside in front, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.

If you need better cooling, I suggest a twin tower air cooler like a noctua NH-D15s or bequiet DRP4 is a better solution. Thermaltake makes good ones also.
Such a cooler will be equally as effective as a 280 aio. You would need a 360 aio to do better.
Two 140mm radiator equivalents on a 280 aio are about the same heat transfer capability as each of the twin air cooler radiator stacks of the drp4 or D15s. The only difference is where the heat transfer takes place.
Such an air cooler will be cheaper, quieter, more reliable, and will preserve the cleansing capability of a positive pressure front intake.
 

Bobbrugge

Honorable
May 2, 2014
72
4
10,535
0
Hi,

I have a h440 case with MA610P aircooler and i7 6700k cpu at stock.

I'm just ordered a new i7 10700 with a clc 280 liquid cooler (I'm planning to install it in the top of the case). The thing is, I'm not sure if the current case is good enough in terms of airflow to cool the new cpu.

With my current cpu, the temp is usually around 66-69 with %90-100 load ( the cpu fan speed is ~%75 when the temp exceeds 65 and it won't go %100 unless the temp is 75)
The max temp I got is 72. But it's under 70 for like %99 of the time.

Do I need a new case in order to cool the cpu or I'm good with the h440?
Not throwing shade, but is that top front fan doing anything but screwing up the internal airflow? My understanding is that top front fan isn't a great place for airflow.
I installed my AIO fans so they are sucking cool air through the rad. I have 6 intake fans and only 1 exhaust, so I am trying to create a lot of pressure in the case. I know this sucks warm air into the case, but it also sucks cool air through the rad instead of blowing hot case air through the rad.
Not trying to highjack the thread, just trying to learn something. That H440 is a sweet looking case!
 
Reactions: frogpuppy
Sep 3, 2019
24
2
15
0
The H440 is more than enough case for a good cooling setup...just make sure to populate all of the available front intake fan positions and that your AIO is exhausting out the top of the case.
So I need to install the fan and radiator like this to make it exhaust right?



Shouldn't I install it like this to push the air through the radiator?



Not throwing shade, but is that top front fan doing anything but screwing up the internal airflow? My understanding is that top front fan isn't a great place for airflow.
I installed my AIO fans so they are sucking cool air through the rad. I have 6 intake fans and only 1 exhaust, so I am trying to create a lot of pressure in the case. I know this sucks warm air into the case, but it also sucks cool air through the rad instead of blowing hot case air through the rad.
Not trying to highjack the thread, just trying to learn something. That H440 is a sweet looking case!
Right now I have 3 120mm intake (front) and two 140mm exhaust fans (back and top-back)
 

dorsai

Honorable
Which side of the radiator the fans are on isn't that important...whatever works best in your case...the issue is you want them pushing the heat out of the case. You could alternatively place the rad in the front of the case pulling air in and use the top spots for exhaust fans...but why put hot air on the gpu and motherboard components if you can avoid it.
 
Reactions: frogpuppy
Sep 3, 2019
24
2
15
0
Which side of the radiator the fans are on isn't that important...whatever works best in your case...the issue is you want them pushing the heat out of the case. You could alternatively place the rad in the front of the case pulling air in and use the top spots for exhaust fans...but why put hot air on the gpu and motherboard components if you can avoid it.
I don't think the I'll place the radiator in the front. I think the top will be better.
I just not sure if I should make the fans push the air to the radiator (like the second pic above) or make them pull from the radiator (like the first pic)
 
You do not need a new case.
Yours is perfectly good, and it is an excellent case for an air cooler.

Your current cooler is doing a fine job with your 6700K, and I would expect it to perform equally well with a I7-10700K.
My advice is to try your current cooler and see how you do.

If you think heat is a problem, then you can consider upgrading the cooler.
How you mount a aio radiator is a bit of catch22.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside in front, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.

If you need better cooling, I suggest a twin tower air cooler like a noctua NH-D15s or bequiet DRP4 is a better solution. Thermaltake makes good ones also.
Such a cooler will be equally as effective as a 280 aio. You would need a 360 aio to do better.
Two 140mm radiator equivalents on a 280 aio are about the same heat transfer capability as each of the twin air cooler radiator stacks of the drp4 or D15s. The only difference is where the heat transfer takes place.
Such an air cooler will be cheaper, quieter, more reliable, and will preserve the cleansing capability of a positive pressure front intake.
 
Sep 3, 2019
24
2
15
0
You do not need a new case.
Yours is perfectly good, and it is an excellent case for an air cooler.

Your current cooler is doing a fine job with your 6700K, and I would expect it to perform equally well with a I7-10700K.
My advice is to try your current cooler and see how you do.

If you think heat is a problem, then you can consider upgrading the cooler.
How you mount a aio radiator is a bit of catch22.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside in front, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.

If you need better cooling, I suggest a twin tower air cooler like a noctua NH-D15s or bequiet DRP4 is a better solution. Thermaltake makes good ones also.
Such a cooler will be equally as effective as a 280 aio. You would need a 360 aio to do better.
Two 140mm radiator equivalents on a 280 aio are about the same heat transfer capability as each of the twin air cooler radiator stacks of the drp4 or D15s. The only difference is where the heat transfer takes place.
Such an air cooler will be cheaper, quieter, more reliable, and will preserve the cleansing capability of a positive pressure front intake.
Thank you for your answer. I really appreciate your help.

I'll try installing the aio at a pull configuration at top first and see how the things go. I actually thought about getting a d15s which is a fantastic cooler. However, it went out of stock (limited shop option here in my country unfortunately) when the 10700k was in stock so I bought the clc 280.
 
Reactions: Bobbrugge

Bobbrugge

Honorable
May 2, 2014
72
4
10,535
0
Which side of the radiator the fans are on isn't that important...whatever works best in your case...the issue is you want them pushing the heat out of the case. You could alternatively place the rad in the front of the case pulling air in and use the top spots for exhaust fans...but why put hot air on the gpu and motherboard components if you can avoid it.
I did a bunch of research, or at least some. My research involved looking at what other people were able to demonstrate.
It seems that the overall effect is about the same. As far as cooling goes. The difference for me is having one exhaust fan versus three. Having only one exhaust fan, in theory, creates a higher pressure in the case causing dust to get blown out through any gap air can find to escape.
While I am sucking cool air through my rad, I am also blowing warmed air into my case. Ultimately, to my mind, the cool air coming into the rad is going to cool the coolant better than blowing already warmed air through it.
 
Reactions: frogpuppy

Bobbrugge

Honorable
May 2, 2014
72
4
10,535
0
You do not need a new case.
Yours is perfectly good, and it is an excellent case for an air cooler.

Your current cooler is doing a fine job with your 6700K, and I would expect it to perform equally well with a I7-10700K.
My advice is to try your current cooler and see how you do.

If you think heat is a problem, then you can consider upgrading the cooler.
How you mount a aio radiator is a bit of catch22.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside in front, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.

If you need better cooling, I suggest a twin tower air cooler like a noctua NH-D15s or bequiet DRP4 is a better solution. Thermaltake makes good ones also.
Such a cooler will be equally as effective as a 280 aio. You would need a 360 aio to do better.
Two 140mm radiator equivalents on a 280 aio are about the same heat transfer capability as each of the twin air cooler radiator stacks of the drp4 or D15s. The only difference is where the heat transfer takes place.
Such an air cooler will be cheaper, quieter, more reliable, and will preserve the cleansing capability of a positive pressure front intake.
Aren't those air coolers, specifically the ND15 just stupid heavy? What does that much leverage on your MOBO do? I thought about one of those too. they are like $50.00 cheaper than my 280mm AIO. But the thing weighs almost 5 lbs!! That can't be good for something! Then there is the width restriction. a 140mm fan with a couple of heat pipes sticking out even further is pretty tall. My hyper evo 212 fit ok in my full size case, but wouldn't give me enough room to install the side cover on a mid sized case.
Not arguing, just asking.
 
Reactions: frogpuppy
Sep 3, 2019
24
2
15
0
Aren't those air coolers, specifically the ND15 just stupid heavy? What does that much leverage on your MOBO do? I thought about one of those too. they are like $50.00 cheaper than my 280mm AIO. But the thing weighs almost 5 lbs!! That can't be good for something! Then there is the width restriction. a 140mm fan with a couple of heat pipes sticking out even further is pretty tall. My hyper evo 212 fit ok in my full size case, but wouldn't give me enough room to install the side cover on a mid sized case.
Not arguing, just asking.
Yeah it's heavy (~2.9 lb) but I don't think it might damage the mobo if you don't move the pc (I mean travelling and such).
And yes the d15 is a huge cooler that actually might block some of the ram slots (32mm ram clearance in dual fan mode) but you can use a single fan mode or get a d15s.
It's really an awesome option if you want an air cooler but it comes with some downsides and the look is one of them specially if you don't get the chromax covers.
 
You have a point.
The NH-D15 weighs 1320grams.
The NH-D15s is 1150g.
A AF freezer 280 aio is heavier at 1572g.
But, the aio radiator is bolted to the case, not the motherboard..
In a normal upright orientation, a heavy air cooler would seem to exert a leverage on the motherboard.
This does not seem to be an issue so long as the pc is relatively static and not bounced around.
Some cases like my silverstone TJ-08e actually have a cooler support mechanism.
A good air cooler will need 160mm available like the NH-D15s. The NH-D15 is a bit taller, needing 165mm.
A counter argument against a aio system is that it could leak with disastrous consequences.
Neither, I think, is much to worry about.

On case cleanliness, the key is to filter the air intake in the first place.
The usual best place is a washable filter on the front intakes.
 
Reactions: frogpuppy

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS