Question Do I need to re-install Windows on my new Mobo, how do I go about this ?

Nov 20, 2022
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Long story short replacing a faulty mobo with another one.
Had the Rog Strix B550i (I broke it by spilling water on it and PC turns on mobo for a few seconds then shuts down)

Im replacing it with a Aorus X570i mini itx mobo.

A few questions;

1. Do I have to re-install windows? Im assuming yes to clean out all the quirks and potential bugs/driver issues from two different mobos?

2. I only have ONE Storage unit which is a NVME Drive 1tb. It has the OS as well as important work on it, is there a risk I could lose all my files? I did a backup a month ago, but my recent work is not saved and no way to retrieve it currently.

3. What about the Windows 10 key? DO I need to buy a windows 10 licence, or is it already stored on my SSD and ready to go?
 
A few questions;
1. Do I have to re-install windows? Im assuming yes to clean out all the quirks and potential bugs/driver issues from two different mobos?
Yes. Reinstall is highly recommended.
2. I only have ONE Storage unit which is a NVME Drive 1tb. It has the OS as well as important work on it, is there a risk I could lose all my files? I did a backup a month ago, but my recent work is not saved and no way to retrieve it currently.
Can't you get another storage device?
Obviously, if you' re not careful, there' s a risk to loose data.
3. What about the Windows 10 key? DO I need to buy a windows 10 licence, or is it already stored on my SSD and ready to go?
There may be a way to reuse your old license from previous pc.
See section
Reactivate Windows 10 after a hardware change
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/reactivating-windows-after-a-hardware-change-2c0e962a-f04c-145b-6ead-fb3fc72b6665
 
Reactions: cAllen and Indi0596
Nov 20, 2022
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Yes. Reinstall is highly recommended.

Can't you get another storage device?
Obviously, if you' re not careful, there' s a risk to loose data.

There may be a way to reuse your old license from previous pc.
See section
Reactivate Windows 10 after a hardware change
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/reactivating-windows-after-a-hardware-change-2c0e962a-f04c-145b-6ead-fb3fc72b6665
Thanks for the quick anwser, on 2nd thought I do have an external USB SSD 500gb (500gb enough to save my work)

But my question regarding to that 2nd point, how would I transfer data from my NVME to my external SSD through the bios?
Do I just boot up a scuffed version of windows 10 on my new mobo, transfer my work files THEN re-install fresh windows?
Have never done PC builds before so im just thinking stuff through before I follow up.
 

USAFRet

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2. I only have ONE Storage unit which is a NVME Drive 1tb. It has the OS as well as important work on it, is there a risk I could lose all my files? I did a backup a month ago, but my recent work is not saved and no way to retrieve it currently.
Your personal data, the "important work", NEEDS to be backed up on some other device.
The OS reinstall WILL wipe out everything on this drive.

If you only have this one drive, you have problems.
 
Nov 20, 2022
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Your personal data, the "important work", NEEDS to be backed up on some other device.
The OS reinstall WILL wipe out everything on this drive.

If you only have this one drive, you have problems.
I do have an external SSD that I can back up to, but I dont have another computer where I can install my NVME drive.
So im screwed basically?
 
Thanks for the quick anwser, on 2nd thought I do have an external USB SSD 500gb (500gb enough to save my work)

But my question regarding to that 2nd point, how would I transfer data from my NVME to my external SSD through the bios?
Do I just boot up a scuffed version of windows 10 on my new mobo, transfer my work files THEN re-install fresh windows?
Have never done PC builds before so im just thinking stuff through before I follow up.
How you backup depends a bit on how you store it. If you keep everything in one of your Library folders (Documents, Music, Pictures, etc.) then you can use Windows' File History. It's gotten quirky with recent updates but does work.

If you keep files in folders all over, even outside of your account folders, then a backup program might be required. But you'll have to identify all the folders where you've stored files.

Then there's simply getting a cloud account on OneDrive and using Windows backup and sync services...just type Windows Backup in Cortana to get started. The default size of your OneDrive account is pretty small so you'll have to sign up to get more. But again, knowing where you store all your files is important so you can get all folders.

DO NOT backup game folders that are installed through launchers, e.g., Steam. You'll re-install the launchers and then download the games again. Be sure you have all passwords and are using cloud game saves. The same is possible for games you installed from DVD's, but you may have to find the save game folders to grab them. This saves massive amounts of space on your backup storage. Once game installation folders are ignored most people can back-up onto a 128 or 256GB USB stick.

Recovering can be complicated onto a new system. What might work is simply changing the MoBo and going into the existing Windows on the chance it will work. If it won't boot-up the matter's settled, you'll have to re-install Windows and go about recovering from your chosen backups.

If it boots up be sure to un-install all drivers and re-install those for the new motherboard (especially chipset/cpu drivers). If it remains troublesome (probably will be) do a Repair Install with In-Place Upgrade. This installs Windows on top of the existing install fixing up settings for newly discovered/changed hardware in the process. It makes no changes to files or installed applications so they will be where you left them afterwords.

If the Repair Install works you're golden. If it's still troublesome then you either spend the rest of your life chasing phantoms or do a clean install, reinstall everything and recover your files from backups made above.

Whatever you do making some sort of backup before you start tearing down your current system gives you the ability to find important files regardless of what happens after you reassemble it.
 
Last edited:
Nov 20, 2022
11
0
10
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How you backup depends a bit on how you store it. If you keep everything in one of your Library folders (Documents, Music, Pictures, etc.) then you can use Windows' File History. It's gotten quirky with recent updates but does work.

If you keep files in folders all over, even outside of your account folders, then a backup program might be required. But you'll have to identify all the folders where you've stored files.

Then there's simply getting a cloud account on OneDrive and using Windows backup and sync services...just type Windows Backup in Cortana to get started. The default size of your OneDrive account is pretty small so you'll have to sign up to get more. But again, knowing where you store all your files is important so you can get all folders.

DO NOT backup game folders that are installed through launchers, e.g., Steam. You'll re-install the launchers and then download the games again. Be sure you have all passwords and are using cloud game saves. The same is possible for games you installed from DVD's, but you may have to find the save game folders to grab them. This saves massive amounts of space on your backup storage. Once game installation folders are ignored most people can back-up onto a 128 or 256GB USB stick.

Recovering can be complicated onto a new system. What might work is simply changing the MoBo and going into the existing Windows on the chance it will work. If it won't boot-up the matter's settled, you'll have to re-install Windows and go about recovering from your chosen backups.

If it boots up be sure to un-install all drivers and re-install those for the new motherboard (especially chipset/cpu drivers). If it remains troublesome (probably will be) do a Repair Install with In-Place Upgrade. This installs Windows on top of the existing install fixing up settings for newly discovered/changed hardware in the process. It makes no changes to files or installed applications so they will be where you left them afterwords.

If the Repair Install works you're golden. If it's still troublesome then you either spend the rest of your life chasing phantoms or do a clean install, reinstall everything and recover your files from backups made above.

Whatever you do making some sort of backup before you start tearing down your current system gives you the ability to find important files regardless of what happens after you reassemble it.
Turns on I didn't need to reinstall windows or anything for that fact, replaced my motherboard, put my old NVME into it and it works perfect.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
161,125
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Turns on I didn't need to reinstall windows or anything for that fact, replaced my motherboard, put my old NVME into it and it works perfect.
Wait a bit on that "works perfect" thought.

When changing the motherboard, there are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It works just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months
You may have gotten lucky, and are seeing #1.
But you may be at #3 and just don't know it yet.


In any case, NOW is the time to start a good backup routine.
 
Reactions: Indi0596 and cAllen
Turns on I didn't need to reinstall windows or anything for that fact, replaced my motherboard, put my old NVME into it and it works perfect.
Yah..well...I wouldn't trust it to stay that way.

If nothing else uninstall drivers, especially chipset/cpu drivers, and reinstall them. And get ready for some unexplained crashes.

I'd also suggest doing the Rapair Install process I linked above just in case.
 
Reactions: Indi0596
Nov 20, 2022
11
0
10
0
Wait a bit on that "works perfect" thought.

When changing the motherboard, there are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It works just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months
You may have gotten lucky, and are seeing #1.
But you may be at #3 and just don't know it yet.


In any case, NOW is the time to start a good backup routine.
Yep Im doing it right now, just as I posted that comment that water mark on bottom right saying I have to activate windows popped up :D.
 

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