Question Do I really need an io shield?

Jun 19, 2021
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So I’m building my first pc and installing the io shield has been a pain - I’ve spent 5 hours and pricked myself 6 times trying to install it with no luck. Im starting to think I’m cursed so is it possible for me to finish the build and use it just without the io shield?

also small side note but I read that more dust comes in but I have 6 case fans, one next to the io shield two on the top and three at the front facing the io shield as well as a dust filter on the top, would this do anything against extra dust?
 

USAFRet

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So I’m building my first pc and installing the io shield has been a pain - I’ve spent 5 hours and pricked myself 6 times trying to install it with no luck. Im starting to think I’m cursed so is it possible for me to finish the build and use it just without the io shield?

also small side note but I read that more dust comes in but I have 6 case fans, one next to the io shield two on the top and three at the front facing the io shield as well as a dust filter on the top, would this do anything against extra dust?
Air currents can do weird things.
Even with theoretical positive pressure, that will be a pathway for air (dust) to come in.
 
Jun 19, 2021
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did you ever work out which Musetex case it is you have?

Problems might be the case you have as well.

i thought i knew name for somewhere - PCGamer link

his question here makes me wonder - 2nd PC Gamer link

photos might help, you can upload them to imgur and show link here.
So here is a video on how to install the IO shield

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAWNzd-gc3Q


Do you need an IO shield, NO. The motherboard even doesn't need a case to run.

But it's recommended to have the IO shield to fully protect the motherboard by preventing small objects or insects from coming to the inside.
what is the problem when trying to install?

unless the plate itself or the case opening is bent or otherwise damaged it should just pop in place from the inside.
problem is just that the motherboard goes into the io shield perfectly but cannot align with the nails and the gpu gets stuck

I’m just interested if it’s that important though
 
problem is just that the motherboard goes into the io shield perfectly but cannot align with the nails and the gpu gets stuck
what nails?
i have never encountered a motherboard, case, or I\O panel that uses nails.

and your GPU should be nowhere near the motherboard's rear I\O.
do you mean the motherboard's HDMI and\or DP ports are not fitting into the I\O panel's cutouts?

as others have suggested, post some images of the issue and the space(s) involved.
 

ClapTrapper

Prominent
May 25, 2020
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Don't sweat it!
If no answer was satisfactory here,still don't sweat it.

Ask your sister for a leg nylon (do girls still wear these? Dang I'm old!) .
Take the nylon (or any fabric like this that will stop bugs and dust from getting thru) then just duck tape it to your case . Now punch small hole where the output connectors should come thru the IO Shield.
Then just push the input connectors (HDMI cable,Audio cables,etc) thru the nylon (or similar fabric). Presto! You now have a better IO shield than an IO shield because you are getting a bit of filtered air as a bonus.

People are making responses way more complicated than it should be.

If you are worried about not having a IO shield (and you really shouldn't stress over that),then try what I said.
 
problem is just that the motherboard goes into the io shield perfectly but cannot align with the nails and the gpu gets stuck

I’m just interested if it’s that important though
I'm pretty sure you mean the threaded stand offs when you are trying to align the motherboard with the 'nails'.

Be sure to install the panel right-side up, but even then it can be tricky to align the connectors with the cutouts especially with the little EMI fingers getting in the way. Bending them back, if you can, makes it easier.

But in the end, you really don't absolutely need it. In fact, many people leave it off as it can make for better air flow across the VRM heatsink when left off.
 
That's a valid argument, given that your VRM have a heat-sink.
It serves to illustrate the non-deliterious nature of it's absence. That makes it a valid argument in favor of OP leaving it off even if he doesn't have a heatsink.

Personally I'd make every effort to put it on too since completeness of assembly is very satisfying to my OCD. I can imagine that's coloring a lot of this discussion.
 
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Unless the shield or the case is non standard, things should install.

First, be certain that the shield is oriented to match the motherboard rear panel connectors.
The shield is a press fit.
You need to press the shield into place a bit at a time going around the periphery.
All edges must be seated.
If this is really not possible, then there is a manufacturing error and you can abandon the shield.

Assuming the shield fits in place, you really need three hands to get the motherboard into place.
A helper is useful here.
Usually, you need to press the motherboard into the shield and find a way to hold it there. Takes one hand for that.
Some shields have spring like tabs that need to be compressed.
Next thread a motherboard post screw into one of the posts near the shield.
Leave it loose. This takes two hands. One to hold the screw in place, and another to turn the screwdriver.
If you have a magnetic tip #2 philips screwdriver to hold the screw this can be done with one hand.

Once that first screw is in place, you should be able to lever the motherboard against whatever spring resistance the shield offers.
Get all motherboard screws in loosely before securing them.

What is the make/model of your case, and parts inside?
Most of the time, two front intake fans of 120/140mm size and a 120mm rear exhaust
will be sufficient for an air cooler.
If all the air intake is from one source, and is filtered, your parts will stay relatively clear of dust.
Adding extra top fans will tend to draw in unfiltered air from adjacent openings,
It will also divert cooling air from the motherboard and cooler and out the top without doing any cooling.

AIO mounts get complicated and compromises must be made.
 

punkncat

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A couple of years ago a friend gave me an i5 8600K and a Gigabyte Z series motherboard with no I/O shield. He had a warranty issue that it somehow got misplaced. He used it for a while without. I built into a Corsair case with no I/O shield in place and used it for fooling around with virtual machines for a bit. I sold it to a friend who had me add a graphics card and gave to his son to play PC games on. There is still no I/O shield. It works fine if being just slightly unsightly.
 

revodo

Proper
Jun 10, 2021
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Don't sweat it!
If no answer was satisfactory here,still don't sweat it.

Ask your sister for a leg nylon (do girls still wear these? Dang I'm old!) .
Take the nylon (or any fabric like this that will stop bugs and dust from getting thru) then just duck tape it to your case . Now punch small hole where the output connectors should come thru the IO Shield.
Then just push the input connectors (HDMI cable,Audio cables,etc) thru the nylon (or similar fabric). Presto! You now have a better IO shield than an IO shield because you are getting a bit of filtered air as a bonus.

People are making responses way more complicated than it should be.

If you are worried about not having a IO shield (and you really shouldn't stress over that),then try what I said.
This man started when computers were hole punch machines. Give him a pack of bubblegum and a hammer and he'll fix anything.
 

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