Question Do the SKU numbers on an intel processor give us an idea of the difference in performance between 2 processors in the same generation?

teo.kostovski

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I know the SKU number is pretty much a way for the manifacturer to label products as is the core idea of SKU. but can we get a rough idea of performance differences between different sku numbers?
 
If you have the Intel 5 digit model and use a site like cpuworld, you can find out the differences between two processors pretty easily. You can't really tell with confidence from just the model number. For example, the i3-4130 and i3-4330--you don't know what the difference is by the model numbers.
 

Karadjgne

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Back in the day, you could. Cpus were binned and batched and the sku would tell you which factory, which batch etc. Comparing that against other online info from other people, certain batches were quantified as having certain properties.

For instance some Malay S i7-3770K would run high voltages but cooler temps and generally wouldn't see 4.9GHz at less than 1.4v, while other LB i7-3770K would run low voltage but high temps, and would easily see 4.9GHz at just over 1.3v.

But that practice has basically stopped since then, partly due to delidding, partly due to Intel uniformity and quality control practice improvements and partly due to the sheer mass quantities of pc's as compared to 7 years ago. By the time all that relevant data was discected, there's a new generation out.

So realistically no, the only thing a sku will tell you is what the cpu is, Intel keeps its own production records for private company usage.
 

beers

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You can't really tell with confidence from just the model number. For example, the i3-4130 and i3-4330--you don't know what the difference is by the model numbers.
That doesn't really make sense as the model number is the definitive value tied to the clock, core count, cache etc parameters. Simply because you aren't well versed in the product line doesn't mean they aren't easily comparable.

For quick reference you can just google the part number and get the Intel spec sheet, to which you can do an apples to apples comparison.

As above, it was common to compare SKUs against the same CPU model or similar to gauge overclocking potential against others with similar SKUs out of the same factory or production date, but that isn't as much as of an aspect today.
 

Karadjgne

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As above, it was common to compare SKUs against the same CPU model or similar to gauge overclocking potential against others with similar SKUs out of the same factory or production date, but that isn't as much as of an aspect today.
Yep. That's exactly what I did with my i7-3770K. Sat around watching ebay, looking at sku numbers until a cpu popped up with the batch I was after. Even got lucky, dude listed it as an i5-3770k, so no bids against me, cost $50. But it'll do 5.0GHz at 1.402v and 4.9GH at 1.328v, so I'm good.
 
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That doesn't really make sense as the model number is the definitive value tied to the clock, core count, cache etc parameters. Simply because you aren't well versed in the product line doesn't mean they aren't easily comparable.
If one has to memorize a product line to do comparisons, one isn't using the Internet properly.

It is interesting to know about the history of SKUs. I'm sure some of it might even apply today seeing how malay and vietam processors even use a different font on the 4790k--the differences probably don't stop there.
 
Yep. That's exactly what I did with my i7-3770K. Sat around watching ebay, looking at sku numbers until a cpu popped up with the batch I was after. Even got lucky, dude listed it as an i5-3770k, so no bids against me, cost $50. But it'll do 5.0GHz at 1.402v and 4.9GH at 1.328v, so I'm good.
Nice score! I need to send you my 3770k sku number and see if it was part of a good batch or not. Just out of curiosity more than anything else. I probably won't do more than put and all core turbo on it unless it's super easy.
 
I know the SKU number is pretty much a way for the manifacturer to label products as is the core idea of SKU. but can we get a rough idea of performance differences between different sku numbers?
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/processor-numbers.html
You can easily see the generation the SKU number and the suffix.
The higher the generation and the higher the SKU number the faster and the more features you will have in general.The suffix can also tell you if it's a low power T(slower) or a high power K (overclockable) unit and or if it has graphics and how strong they are.
 

Karadjgne

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Nice score! I need to send you my 3770k sku number and see if it was part of a good batch or not. Just out of curiosity more than anything else. I probably won't do more than put and all core turbo on it unless it's super easy.

Mine is L211B477 batch. There's more pages like this one, but it's been so long, the memory of just about all of them is long gone into history. I just kept following links etc. Lots of google/bing time as they'll pop up on either browser, not necessarily both.
 
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This info came in handy back in the days of perhaps the Celeron 300a, P3-600A, etc., as a few folks noted that most CPUs from whichever assembly plant might have had better silicon, revision tweaks, etc....

Nowadays, the info is not all really useful, unless shopping for overclockable CPUs from 8-10 years ago....minimum. And, given the $120 each R3-3300X lays proverbial waste to every other value processor...what would be the point? :)
 

Karadjgne

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Maybe some R3 3300x get better and more stable OC, or like the i7-7700k, some batches ran at 1.4v stock while others ran at 1.1v stock.

Trending batches isn't a bad idea, but with quickie rma's, pbo and other such stuff being of far greater interest to most folks, making a best batch compendium would be pretty much the onus of the i9's and R9's, and they don't get much OC really that Silicon Lottery doesn't already have. I'm sure they have a batch list, just so they don't waste time trying for uber OC on cpus they figure can't do it.
 

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