[SOLVED] Does 1000 Mbps router mean this speed on Each of the 4 ethernetports?

Nov 22, 2019
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Hello!

I have a simple question I think.

If we have a router with those specifications:
LAN-speed: 1000 Mbps
4 ethernet ports

Now I wonder:
  1. Does each ethernet port support 1000 Mbps?
  2. If question 1 is true. It would be better of to use all 4 ports if I have for example 24 IP cameras connected from switches instead of connecting all of those cameras to for example port 1 Only?
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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Its not additive.
Each port can transfer 1 gigabit.

A switch connected to one of those ports will transfer 1 gigabit. If you have multiple devices connected to that switch, they share that 1 gigabit up to the router.

If you connect ALL cameras to a large switch, and that switch to one port on the router...all those cameras share that 1 gigabit up to the router.

So...
You'd have 6 cameras sharing a 1 gigabit port, or 24 cameras sharing a gigabit port.

Would one of those router ports also support a PC or DVR?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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  1. Yes. The 4 ports on the router is actually the same circuitry as a switch. Each port has full gigabit performance.
  2. Yes but...
What else is connected to the router?
You're going to need a switch or two in there, due to the number of cameras.
 
Nov 22, 2019
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  1. Yes. The 4 ports on the router is actually the same circuitry as a switch. Each port has full gigabit performance.
  2. Yes but...
What else is connected to the router?
You're going to need a switch or two in there, due to the number of cameras.
The below is the only thing that will be connected to the router. Okay if I understand. Does that mean that there are:

4 ports x 1 gibabit = 4 gigabite? (If I use all 4 ports)

The idéa would be to for example then connect 4 switches(8 port switches) to the router where I connect 1 switch to each port on the router to use the bandwidth of the router as good as I can.

Am I thinking correct here or wouldnt it be any difference if I did connect all switches(cascading) to port 1 on the router?

I should divide them on all 4 ports?
 
no 4 ports = 1gigabite shared
can be 1G/0/0/0 or 300/50/600/100 or whatever bandwit h device needs up to total 1G
its shared
total bandwith cant exceed 1Giga

all devices will have access to 1Gbit, if your devices will need more (4gigabit) then u will need better router/switch
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
119,952
3,222
159,340
19,385
Its not additive.
Each port can transfer 1 gigabit.

A switch connected to one of those ports will transfer 1 gigabit. If you have multiple devices connected to that switch, they share that 1 gigabit up to the router.

If you connect ALL cameras to a large switch, and that switch to one port on the router...all those cameras share that 1 gigabit up to the router.

So...
You'd have 6 cameras sharing a 1 gigabit port, or 24 cameras sharing a gigabit port.

Would one of those router ports also support a PC or DVR?
 
Nov 22, 2019
17
0
10
0
no 4 ports = 1gigabite shared
can be 1G/0/0/0 or 300/50/600/100
its shared
total bandwith cant exceed 1Giga
Then I understand.
Its not additive.
Each port can transfer 1 gigabit.

A switch connected to one of those ports will transfer 1 gigabit. If you have multiple devices connected to that switch, they share that 1 gigabit up to the router.

If you connect ALL cameras to a large switch, and that switch to one port on the router...all those cameras share that 1 gigabit up to the router.

So...
You'd have 6 cameras sharing a 1 gigabit port, or 24 cameras sharing a gigabit port.

Would one of those router ports also support a PC or DVR?
Yes, then I follow now how it works. It is 1 gigabit in total then. So all 24 cameras will share 1 gigabit because that is the total bandwidth.

Yes, one of the port would be connected to a PC that is true. A PC where it is possible to view the cameras feed on.
 

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