Question Does a 100 mbps connection show more than 100 sometimes or is it precisely capped at 100 ?

bniknafs9

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i ask because i'm not sure if the cable is cat 6 or more , also i'm not sure if the port on the fiber modem is 100 mbps or if it's 1000. in speed test it goes to about 127 but then it goes back to 100 . is this capped at 100 ?? please help
 

USAFRet

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What "connection"?
Is this "100" what you pay the SP for?
Or is it your router ports?


I have a 100/100 connection from my ISP, and it wwill frequently read at "102/120" or similar.
A 100 megabit port on your router WILL cap out at 100.
 

bniknafs9

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Jan 21, 2019
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What "connection"?
Is this "100" what you pay the SP for?
Or is it your router ports?


I have a 100/100 connection from my ISP, and it wwill frequently read at "102/120" or similar.
A 100 megabit port on your router WILL cap out at 100.
thank you air force man for your answer

the ISP doesn't have a clear policy , it is capped around 100 by the ISP

but my question was about the set up at my home. i'm not sure if the port on my fiber modem is 100 or 1000 (Gig) , cause they didn't give me the modem's password . i think two of the ports are Gig the other two are 100 mbps . and the cable is generic , there's nothing printed on it .
from there it's connected to a 1000 port on a wireless access point and from there to my computer and laptop.



This is mah question , thank you in advance
 

kanewolf

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i ask because i'm not sure if the cable is cat 6 or more , also i'm not sure if the port on the fiber modem is 100 mbps or if it's 1000. in speed test it goes to about 127 but then it goes back to 100 . is this capped at 100 ?? please help
There is overhead associated with network traffic. Usually the ISP will allocate above the advertised speed to allow for the overhead and ensure you get your paid for speed.
 
You can likely figure out the port speeds by plugging your pc into each and then looking at the network status and it will show you the speed it connected. Most routers have all the same speed ports but I have seen some strange devices people post here so it is possible the speeds are different.

In general if the port is physically 100mbps you will get around 94mbps because of the overhead for the mac addresses in the packets. If you see rates even slightly over 100mbps that means the port is running at gigabit speed and there is a limit in the ISP network.
 

USAFRet

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i ask because if in the future they upgrade speeds on my current plan, i wouldn't be missing anything ... ??
As long as you get around the same thing as what you pay for, you're not missing out on anything.

Over the years, my connection has been upgraded from 25/25, to 5050, to 75/75, to the current 100/100....without me asking or doing anything.
 

bniknafs9

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Jan 21, 2019
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You can likely figure out the port speeds by plugging your pc into each and then looking at the network status and it will show you the speed it connected. Most routers have all the same speed ports but I have seen some strange devices people post here so it is possible the speeds are different.

In general if the port is physically 100mbps you will get around 94mbps because of the overhead for the mac addresses in the packets. If you see rates even slightly over 100mbps that means the port is running at gigabit speed and there is a limit in the ISP network.
thanks for the help bro. i think i'll be doing what you said with a cat 7 cable , just in case
 

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