Question Does a cpu still need to support non ecc memory

Feb 18, 2021
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The motherboard supports DDR-4000 memory and the CPU details says DDR4-2666 but that is for ECC memory. Does the CPU still have to support the memory if its DDR4-4000 non ecc memory? Will it not operate, or downgrade to 2666?
 
That should be irrelevant considering this would apply to all motherboard and CPU's. Looking at Intel boards and CPU's
Well if it's Intel and it has ECC support it's got to be some type of workstation or server cpu as they don't officially support ECC ram on consumer products (at least that I am aware of). If that is the case then I have no idea if non ecc or higher clocked memory is supported.

In any case, the best bet when looking at memory compatibility is to look up the specific motherboard memory QVL testing notes, as different cpu and motherboard combos get differing results and may work but at reduced speeds vs the rating, or at modified timings.

Edit: Also motherboard type is important (again especially for Intel) as Intel cap memory frequency on their lower end boards. On the consumer side it's only the high end Z series boards that support 'overclocked' memory (i.e. memory higher than the CPU's officially supported speed).
 
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Feb 18, 2021
3
0
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Well if it's Intel and it has ECC support it's got to be some type of workstation or server cpu as they don't officially support ECC ram on consumer products (at least that I am aware of). If that is the case then I have no idea if non ecc or higher clocked memory is supported.

In any case, the best bet when looking at memory compatibility is to look up the specific motherboard memory QVL testing notes, as different cpu and motherboard combos get differing results and may work but at reduced speeds vs the rating, or at modified timings.

Edit: Also motherboard type is important (again especially for Intel) as Intel cap memory frequency on their lower end boards. On the consumer side it's only the high end Z series boards that support 'overclocked' memory (i.e. memory higher than the CPU's officially supported speed).

Good to know, this is one setup i am considering though the cpu does not support ECC

Intel® Core™ i9-9980XE Extreme Edition Processor


ASUS TUF X299 MARK 2 LGA2066 DDR4 M.2 USB 3.1 X299 ATX Motherboard for Intel Core i9 and i7 X-Series Processors
 
Here is the Asus memory QVL report for that motherboard:
https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA2066/TUF_X299_MARK1/Intel_CoreX-SeriesCPU_6core_or_above_DRAM_QVL.pdf

Fastest tested memory is 4200 mhz (but only a couple of kits). If you want to go with fast ram, I suggest looking at one of the tested kits from that list, as that is tested and approved by Asus.
 

Karadjgne

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That was the fastest memory tested at the time of that webpage release. It won't be updated. At the time, there wasn't faster than that. Now there's a few kits out with 5000MHz ram, so using anything that's higher than Asus tested is going to be pot-luck.

But the QVL doesn't tell the whole story. If SkHynix based ram tested out fine at 4200, it's not going to make a difference if its Corsair or Adata or Patriot or anything else not listed, the ic's are the same, different paint job and heatsink, which is inconsequential. Most of the 3600+ are Samsung, normally B-die, but can be D or Z die at looser timings.
 

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