[SOLVED] does a mesh network system turn off the current wifi system or add to it thus if i add 2 units i will have the router as well

mikenmont

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I am moving soon to an old house with solid brick walls to give you an idea my current isp router signal will not even get out of 1 room. I want to introduce a good quality vpn router this I believe will cable to the isp modem.. then turn off the isp wireless signal. that should cover the ground floor then cable up to the next floor and put the mesh units in the upper rooms. I have been told that this will create 2 different networks up and down stairs I know my signal will not go to my upper floors from the ground floor. I dont know if I can do this another way but my electrician said the earth loop on one floor is not connected to the other. cant find out much about mesh networking
 
A AP ie access point is really extra wifi radios that are connected to your router via ethernet.

There really is no wifi based solution to the problem of the signal not being able to get out of room because of the walls. Most routers put out maximum legal power so they will be similar in their ability to go through walls. Most times the problem is the end device. Things like cell phones have tiny antenna and low power radios to save battery.

The only solution is to chop holes in the walls :)

In effect that what ethernet is doing. You are drilling a hole in the wall to get your network into other rooms. Once there you use a AP to convert it back to wifi.

If you can not actually use ethernet you need to look at other things that pass through the walls. You can use powerline networks that use the electrical wires to go from room to room. The newer AV2 models work pretty well even in old houses. You can either get powerline units with AP already in the remote unit or you can hook a AP to the remote powerline unit.

Another option would be to use MoCA if you have tv coax in rooms.

When we dealt with commercial buildings that had dense concrete walls we ended up putting a AP in every room. All depends how hard it is to get ethernet to other rooms. Best run in a attic or crawl space but the fast and dirty method of drilling through exterior walls works too. Electrician that install low voltage cables can normally get ethernet into pretty much any room for not a huge amount of money.
 
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Mesh is just a new marketing term for "repeater". Most mesh systems are just renamed repeaters. There are a small number that extra backhaul radios but this is rare.

Since you are running ethernet cables you do not need the repeater function. What you are doing is running AP. A mesh system can run as a AP but you can use any router to run as a AP or if you really want to they do sell AP devices.

The only reason you would have 2 networks is because some of the mesh units are really stupid and will not coexists with another router.

This is a additional reason to no buy a mesh system and just build your own network of AP.

Using AP you will only have 1 network with your vpn router ? running as the main router for the house.
 

mikenmont

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thank for reply/ what do you mean AP and how would you suggest is best way to do this. At the moment I cant even get my signal from lounge to kitchen. but I cant move yet cause we are stuck in covid. I am not sure how the vpn signal will pan out. I am sure this signal will be stronger if I use the right router -not yet picked this- and hopefully cover the ground floor. however I am not sure if I run 1 network cable to one room on the first floor it will even reach the other rooms assuming the walls go all the way up as they do, if the upstairs is as bad as the downstairs I will have the same problems. So it is early days yet as i have not started so i am open to any advice
 
A AP ie access point is really extra wifi radios that are connected to your router via ethernet.

There really is no wifi based solution to the problem of the signal not being able to get out of room because of the walls. Most routers put out maximum legal power so they will be similar in their ability to go through walls. Most times the problem is the end device. Things like cell phones have tiny antenna and low power radios to save battery.

The only solution is to chop holes in the walls :)

In effect that what ethernet is doing. You are drilling a hole in the wall to get your network into other rooms. Once there you use a AP to convert it back to wifi.

If you can not actually use ethernet you need to look at other things that pass through the walls. You can use powerline networks that use the electrical wires to go from room to room. The newer AV2 models work pretty well even in old houses. You can either get powerline units with AP already in the remote unit or you can hook a AP to the remote powerline unit.

Another option would be to use MoCA if you have tv coax in rooms.

When we dealt with commercial buildings that had dense concrete walls we ended up putting a AP in every room. All depends how hard it is to get ethernet to other rooms. Best run in a attic or crawl space but the fast and dirty method of drilling through exterior walls works too. Electrician that install low voltage cables can normally get ethernet into pretty much any room for not a huge amount of money.
 
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mikenmont

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I have measured the external walls in this building at 450mm. inside we have I think about 350 although all the rooms had fireplaces that have been rebricked up and this thickens the wall again and now they have all been thermal boarded in the refurb. I did suspect this was going to be a big problem. looking at the shape of the building I would need to run cables not only up the external walls but across as well. second to this I have the same problem with my phones, these are also wireless units. it looks like a case of ellsbells then and back to the drawing board for me. MoCa never heard off this and yes all rooms have been rewired for tv both sat and terrestrial. what goes with this??
 

mikenmont

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Nice one Bill I have just had a look at these there is a 2.5 now runs through sat. cable witch I do have in every room. I will speak to the sat. installer to make sure our system can go with these. might be a little expensive but could be the answer. just one thing I see I need to have a special adaptor on the back of router to connect the first moca unit. not a problem since I have not yet sorted my vpn router. I think I have it now you connect the router modem to one port and the vpn router to the other port and the signal is then passing through the moca device and then link it to any sat port and the signal is the in all the ports in the property, and just needs as many 2nd moca's for the other rooms as needed.you could have the answer my friend!!
 

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