Question Does an incompatible cpu cause a motherboard to not want to draw power from the psu at all?

Aug 16, 2020
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I have an asrock h67m, i tried testing it with an i3 3240 and it decided not to power on. Fan's aren't spinning, beeper's not beeping. Also, when i unplug the 24pin half way the cpu fan spins and occasionally the psu fan.

Asrock list this cpu as only supported with a certain bios. I have no idea what bios version this mobo has.

Is this a thing? Do motherboards just not draw power at all with an incompatible cpu? Should i just return it? (It was a great deal) Should i get a Celeron g540 to test it before deciding?
 

jay32267

Glorious
"Do motherboards just not draw power at all with an incompatible cpu? "
It's very possible.

"Also, when i unplug the 24pin half way the cpu fan spins and occasionally the psu fan."
Don't do this when it's powered up or you will ruin the motherboard.

That CPU takes BIOS 2.10 which isn't the earliest.

There are some in this list that will work with all BIOSes (there are celerons).

https://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/H67M/index.asp#CPU

You may need one to update the BIOS if that MB doesn't have BIOS flashback which I don't see that it does.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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"Also, when i unplug the 24pin half way the cpu fan spins and occasionally the psu fan."
Don't do this when it's powered up or you will ruin the motherboard.
Oh no, it wasn't intentional and i don't think the motherboard's on, not that i have anyway to tell, it just happened when i was trying to unplugging the psu

"Do motherboards just not draw power at all with an incompatible cpu? "
It's very possible.

That CPU takes BIOS 2.10 which isn't the earliest.

There are some in this list that will work with all BIOSes (there are celerons).

https://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/H67M/index.asp#CPU

You may need one to update the BIOS if that MB doesn't have BIOS flashback which I don't see that it does.
Alright, guess im getting the Celeron g540
 

jay32267

Glorious
"Oh no, it wasn't intentional and i don't think the motherboard's on, not that i have anyway to tell, it just happened when i was trying to unplugging the psu "

Don't ever plug or unplug ANY power supply plug to anything when the power supply is on.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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"Oh no, it wasn't intentional and i don't think the motherboard's on, not that i have anyway to tell, it just happened when i was trying to unplugging the psu "

Don't ever plug or unplug ANY power supply plug to anything when the power supply is on.
The power supply has no button, its one of those old ones. Should i unplug the psu before unplugging the atx 24pin and the cpu 4pin?
 

jay32267

Glorious
The power supply has no button, its one of those old ones. Should i unplug the psu before unplugging the atx 24pin and the cpu 4pin?
Yes.
As a general rule....always unplug the power cord before you start plugging and unplugging other cords. Sometimes....you can get away with unplugging/plugging things hot without damage (you get lucky)....but many times it will cause damage.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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Yes.
As a general rule....always unplug the power cord before you start plugging and unplugging other cords. Sometimes....you can get away with unplugging/plugging things hot without damage (you get lucky)....but many times it will cause damage.
Alright, ill keep that in mind
 
I suspect that your problem is not that of an incompatible i3-3240.

Most of the time differences between gen 2 and 3 are cosmetic.
If a later bios were required to run, I would expect to go through all of the power on steps and leave you with a blank screen. CPU fan should be running.

What is the make/model of your psu?
I suspect that the psu cables were not properly inserted or that the psu is defective.

Regardless, for proper operation of the i3-3240 the bios should be updated.
Perhaps a local shop can do that for you if you do not have a 2nd gen processor to do it.

And, yes, while working on a motherboard, the psu should be unplugged and not just switched off.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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I suspect that your problem is not that of an incompatible i3-3240.

Most of the time differences between gen 2 and 3 are cosmetic.
If a later bios were required to run, I would expect to go through all of the power on steps and leave you with a blank screen. CPU fan should be running.

What is the make/model of your psu?
I suspect that the psu cables were not properly inserted or that the psu is defective.

Regardless, for proper operation of the i3-3240 the bios should be updated.
Perhaps a local shop can do that for you if you do not have a 2nd gen processor to do it.

And, yes, while working on a motherboard, the psu should be unplugged and not just switched off.
Psu, cpu, fan and ram have all been tested to be operational on another board, i've already placed an order on a celeron g540. Which is listed to be supported in any bios, planning on flashing it myself when it comes to it.

Also, since the cpu fan didn't spin, could the mobo just simply be dead?
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
Psu, cpu, fan and ram have all been tested to be operational on another board, i've already placed an order on a celeron g540. Which is listed to be supported in any bios, planning on flashing it myself when it comes to it.

Also, since the cpu fan didn't spin, could the mobo just simply be dead?
That's entirely possible. If your motherboard doesn't power on it's most likely that something could have been bent or broken in the building process. I would check the socket itself to make sure that is indeed the case.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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That's entirely possible. If your motherboard doesn't power on it's most likely that something could have been bent or broken in the building process. I would check the socket itself to make sure that is indeed the case.
I've checked the pins, it looks fine. There also aren't any visible burn marks, the capacitors(?) don't have domed tops.

I still have 3 days to return the board, and the cpu should arrive tommorow
 
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Just a generic psu that I've been using on a separate lga 1155 system for years.
Such a psu is suspect. They do not last forever.
If the new cpu does not work, then go ahead and return the motherboard.
But, I would consider investing in a high quality psu for the long term.
Look for a unit with a 7 - 10 year warranty in the 650/750w range.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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Such a psu is suspect. They do not last forever.
If the new cpu does not work, then go ahead and return the motherboard.
But, I would consider investing in a high quality psu for the long term.
Look for a unit with a 7 - 10 year warranty in the 650/750w range.
Yes, i am aware. But, the motherboard+cpu combo i have costs $30 so it wouldn't make much sense to get a $70 psu to go with it. Also, as i stated before, the psu has been confirmed to be working in another system right before testing it on this motherboard.

This is also not my main system, im just tinkering (my main system uses a corsair cx550)
 
Aug 16, 2020
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An update on the cpu:
Ordered a g540, got a g630😐
Tested it with the g630, didn't work. Going to return the g630
I might just return the Motherboard at this point, im not sure i have enough time to order another cpu
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
Just a generic psu that I've been using on a separate lga 1155 system for years.
Right there is your problem. It's never advisable to use a generic PSU, especially one that's years old. By now the capacitors have worn out, which is why you're experiencing power-related problems. Get that thing replaced immediately, with a unit that is much higher quality. Something Corsair, Seasonic, FSP, Superflower, of that variety.
 
Aug 16, 2020
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Right there is your problem. It's never advisable to use a generic PSU, especially one that's years old. By now the capacitors have worn out, which is why you're experiencing power-related problems. Get that thing replaced immediately, with a unit that is much higher quality. Something Corsair, Seasonic, FSP, Superflower, of that variety.
As i have mentioned multiple times before, this psu was working just 10 minutes before i had tested it with the motherboard, it was in a old pc i had laying around and i use it to test the hardware (only the relatively cheap ones)

The psu is working just fine in a seperate 1155 system with a i3 3240, and had been for 3 years
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
As i have mentioned multiple times before, this psu was working just 10 minutes before i had tested it with the motherboard, it was in a old pc i had laying around and i use it to test the hardware (only the relatively cheap ones)

The psu is working just fine in a seperate 1155 system with a i3 3240, and had been for 3 years
Look at it this way - just because you could, doesn't mean you should. Yeah there is that possibility, but I do guarantee that if you bought a newer and more capale PSU, you wouldn't have the power problems that you are currently having. PSUs don't last forever. Capacitors wear out over time and your PSU won't work the way it would new. It's even worse with a generic PSU. The capacitors on such a unit are most likely of very cheap quality and will wear out that much more quickly. I recently had to replace two high end units in two different machines because of the age of these PSUs (one Seasonic, one EVGA). Even the best PSUs aren't immune from capacitor wear and tear.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Ever seen a 4ft florescent light bulb where the ends are turning purple. That bulb has worked well for years, then one day, it doesn't light, fiddle with the switch a little, and it finally comes on?

That's what happens to capacitors over time. Their insides start turning purple and one day.. nothing happens. So you jam the power switch a couple of times, and 'poof' it works. And may work OK like that for a month before... nothing. Again.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
That's what happens to capacitors over time. Their insides start turning purple and one day.. nothing happens. So you jam the power switch a couple of times, and 'poof' it works. And may work OK like that for a month before... nothing. Again.
I'm continually amazed when people declare something is not broken simply because it worked at a point before it stopped working. Which, if true, would mean either that literally nothing ever breaks or literally nothing ever worked to begin with.
 

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