Question Does anybody know how far Ryzen 5 3600 can OC?

Title.

I got a Ryzen 5 3600. Yay for me. But my motherboard doesn't arrive until this afternoon. I have an excellent AIO liquid cooler. The Corsair H105. Cooling should not be a problem.

I think 4.2GHz to 4.35GHz is what I can expect based on reviews. But what about the per core oc? I noticed the Ryzen 9 boosts to 4.6 and 4.7GHz. I realize that is probably only on 1 core. But does anyone know if I can turn on per core overclocking and get that 4.7GHz goodness on 1 or possibly 2 cores? I'm gonna test this out myself later but I just wonder if it is possible.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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Title.

I got a Ryzen 5 3600. Yay for me. But my motherboard doesn't arrive until this afternoon. I have an excellent AIO liquid cooler. The Corsair H105. Cooling should not be a problem.

I think 4.2GHz to 4.35GHz is what I can expect based on reviews. But what about the per core oc? I noticed the Ryzen 9 boosts to 4.6 and 4.7GHz. I realize that is probably only on 1 core. But does anyone know if I can turn on per core overclocking and get that 4.7GHz goodness on 1 or possibly 2 cores? I'm gonna test this out myself later but I just wonder if it is possible.
Since this is a brand new chip, people have only had it for a couple of days.

You get to be our guinea pig. How far can you get your CPU to go?
Ignore all the utube fools online, with unlimited resources and multiple CPU's to destroy in the process.

What can you do?
 
Lol, he can afford it but I would never delid a soldered CPU. If I did, I would rather use direct on die water cooling.
LOL... I think I'd prefer direct on die phase change cooling . Did you see the temperature vs. overclocked speed curves he presented? This chip loves to be kept cool.

I think the whole point of his video is to demonstrate how the CPU pretty much overclocks itself and anything short of sub zero just ain't gonna get any better than letting it boost on it's own.
 
LOL... I think I'd prefer direct on die phase change cooling . Did you see the temperature vs. overclocked speed curves he presented? This chip loves to be kept cool.

I think the whole point of his video is to demonstrate how the CPU pretty much overclocks itself and anything short of sub zero just ain't gonna get any better than letting it boost on it's own.
Yeah, too bad temperatures are not only important stuff for OC. If x models have at least as good PBO as 2700x does, OC is all but irrelevant.
When I was experimenting with this latest BIOS which is 3rd gen compatible I got better single core scores on PBO2 than with OC on all cores. Reason: All core OC 4.3GHz stable but PBO2 pushes at least one core to 4.35 while other cores hit 4.25 need be. Only thing to worry about is to limit core voltage as it likes to go too high. Good cooling is also important for good boost or XFR would just flatten it out.
 
Yeah, too bad temperatures are not only important stuff for OC. If x models have at least as good PBO as 2700x does, OC is all but irrelevant.
When I was experimenting with this latest BIOS which is 3rd gen compatible I got better single core scores on PBO2 than with OC on all cores. Reason: All core OC 4.3GHz stable but PBO2 pushes at least one core to 4.35 while other cores hit 4.25 need be. Only thing to worry about is to limit core voltage as it likes to go too high. Good cooling is also important for good boost or XFR would just flatten it out.
I'm pretty certain I'd never go so far as to actually try to do phase-change, even if not de-lidded. But I do wish there were more reviews showing how decent AIO water cooling affects Ry3k boosting. I'd like to think it could hold the higher boosts longer, and the sustained boost is higher, at least until the AIO thermally saturates.

I noticed most reviews use the included Wraith cooler. Probably because AMD insisted, to underscore the value proposition of the stock processor with stock cooling, which is obviously awesome. But enthusiasts always want more, both data AND performance! And enthusiasts are the early adopters...they're the ones sending 3900X's into OoS at all the big e-tailers.
 
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I'm pretty certain I'd never go so far as to actually try to do phase-change, even if not de-lidded. But I do wish there were more reviews showing how decent AIO water cooling affects Ry3k boosting. I'd like to think it could hold the higher boosts longer, and the sustained boost is higher, at least until the AIO thermally saturates.

I noticed most reviews use the included Wraith cooler. Probably because AMD insisted, to underscore the value proposition of the stock processor with stock cooling, which is obviously awesome. But enthusiasts always want more, both data AND performance! And enthusiasts are the early adopters...they're the ones sending 3900X's into OoS at all the big e-tailers.
I didn't use Wraith wit 2700x but did use it with 1700x at the beginning and although it did suffice, once I switched to CM Nepton 140XL it did help a bit with auto boost. Now with this setup, I'm sure it helps a lot.
As far as I'm concerned, I'd rather have AMD ship at least top CPUs without a cooler, charge less and let me choose.
Methinks that AMD insists on coolers to make it feel like CPUs are better value, which in some sense it is, enthusiast be damned.
 

InvalidError

Titan
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But I do wish there were more reviews showing how decent AIO water cooling affects Ry3k boosting. I'd like to think it could hold the higher boosts longer, and the sustained boost is higher, at least until the AIO thermally saturates.
That is the issue with liquid coolers: you may get better performance for the first 10-20 minutes but once the loop has reached steady state under load, it performs no better than high-end air since it is limited by the same ambient air temperature.
 

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