[SOLVED] Does living further away from the providers HQ affect the connection?

Flame1

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Please read:

I used to have internet speeds of 70mb DOWN and 20mb UP when I lived in a different city and had a different internet provider.
With my new internet provider in a different city that I moved into I get 360mb DOWN and 40mb UP.

Now the thing is, I noticed that when I am hosting a server on a game (Let's use CS:GO here as an example) my friend gets much higher ping than he used to get when I lived in a different city and had a different internet provider who had much slower internet speeds.

I live in the UK, and he lives in the US, with my old internet provider he used to get 160 Ping and with the new one he is always above 200 Ping.

I did some research and found out that the Headquarters of the new internet provider I have are significantly further away than what the headquarters of the old internet provider were to my previous address.

I also bought an after market router (ASUS RT-AX82U) and selected the games I play to have all their ports forwarded in the router settings, but it didnt improve the ping.

Thanks in advance.
 
You are very much over simplifying the connectivity.

Where the headquarters is means nothing in most cases. It is a building the executives sit in....well they have been sitting at home mostly lately.

Most larger ISP have many many locations with equipment in them. Many time these are just large metal boxes in neighborhoods. The distance between these and you house generally makes little difference also. If it is the older DSL that runs on phone lines it might affect the maximum speed but it does not have a huge impact on the latency.

All the ISP locations and neighborhood boxes are hooked up via some kind of fiber. So in effect the speed to your house is some fraction of the speed of light and the overhead converting back and forth to copper as it passes through things like routers or switches.

When you start looking at international connections it becomes massively complex. Unless you have a very large ISP and are very lucky it is not likely you stay on just 1 ISP. These different ISP do not all connect directly together and they do not always connect in the closet cites. Their are many ISP equipment buildings with multiple ISP in the building in many different cities. Making this even more confusing is the path going to a location can be different than the path coming back. This is releated to ISP trying to keep data on their own network as much as they can. So your data could use different oversea fibers for the data going one way and a different one going the other.

In the end nothing you set on any of your equipment will impact any of this. Your only option is to send and recieve the data over the wire provided to your house by your ISP. That wire will have a fixed amount of latency to the ISP first office/service cabinet. You can have no impact on the path any data takes past that point.
 
Reactions: Flame1
You are very much over simplifying the connectivity.

Where the headquarters is means nothing in most cases. It is a building the executives sit in....well they have been sitting at home mostly lately.

Most larger ISP have many many locations with equipment in them. Many time these are just large metal boxes in neighborhoods. The distance between these and you house generally makes little difference also. If it is the older DSL that runs on phone lines it might affect the maximum speed but it does not have a huge impact on the latency.

All the ISP locations and neighborhood boxes are hooked up via some kind of fiber. So in effect the speed to your house is some fraction of the speed of light and the overhead converting back and forth to copper as it passes through things like routers or switches.

When you start looking at international connections it becomes massively complex. Unless you have a very large ISP and are very lucky it is not likely you stay on just 1 ISP. These different ISP do not all connect directly together and they do not always connect in the closet cites. Their are many ISP equipment buildings with multiple ISP in the building in many different cities. Making this even more confusing is the path going to a location can be different than the path coming back. This is releated to ISP trying to keep data on their own network as much as they can. So your data could use different oversea fibers for the data going one way and a different one going the other.

In the end nothing you set on any of your equipment will impact any of this. Your only option is to send and recieve the data over the wire provided to your house by your ISP. That wire will have a fixed amount of latency to the ISP first office/service cabinet. You can have no impact on the path any data takes past that point.
 
Reactions: Flame1

Flame1

Reputable
Aug 8, 2017
179
4
4,615
6
You are very much over simplifying the connectivity.

Where the headquarters is means nothing in most cases. It is a building the executives sit in....well they have been sitting at home mostly lately.

Most larger ISP have many many locations with equipment in them. Many time these are just large metal boxes in neighborhoods. The distance between these and you house generally makes little difference also. If it is the older DSL that runs on phone lines it might affect the maximum speed but it does not have a huge impact on the latency.

All the ISP locations and neighborhood boxes are hooked up via some kind of fiber. So in effect the speed to your house is some fraction of the speed of light and the overhead converting back and forth to copper as it passes through things like routers or switches.

When you start looking at international connections it becomes massively complex. Unless you have a very large ISP and are very lucky it is not likely you stay on just 1 ISP. These different ISP do not all connect directly together and they do not always connect in the closet cites. Their are many ISP equipment buildings with multiple ISP in the building in many different cities. Making this even more confusing is the path going to a location can be different than the path coming back. This is releated to ISP trying to keep data on their own network as much as they can. So your data could use different oversea fibers for the data going one way and a different one going the other.

In the end nothing you set on any of your equipment will impact any of this. Your only option is to send and recieve the data over the wire provided to your house by your ISP. That wire will have a fixed amount of latency to the ISP first office/service cabinet. You can have no impact on the path any data takes past that point.
I see, I have very limited knowledge on networking and thought this would be much simpler. I thought having a faster internet from a bigger ISP would only improve the connection between me and my friend but I see that is not how it works. Thank you.
 

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