[SOLVED] Does my motherboard support these fans

afmckay

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Apr 16, 2019
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Fans

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KFCRF1A/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=A1Z5H6ZGWCMTNX&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07D4KR9HY/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A1Z5H6ZGWCMTNX&psc=1

motherboard


I plan on getting 3 of the 140mm and 1 of the 120mm

My motherboard manual says "max power - 12w" for the fan connectors. But the fan links only say theyre "12v" and "24v"with no mention of watts. i dont know much about electricity.

Note: i know these fans are super loud, and thats a good thing for me. I have tinnitus and the white noise helps make it unnoticeable. Them cooling the <Mod Edit> out of my PC is a bonus. Im getting a sabrent pcie4 SSD and from the reviews those things can heat up super hot even with the heatsink.
 
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Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Yes for all except the 24 V model - do not get one of those.

Some generalizations first. There are two major types of fans, usually called "3-pin" and "4-pin". The 4-pin models also are known as PWM fans, and are a newer design. The older 3-pin fans also are called Voltage-Controlled fans. Each requires a different method of controlling the speed. The 3-pin type requires Voltage Control Mode , aka DC Mode, and it changes the voltage supplied to the fan on Pin #2. The newer PWM type requires PWM Mode, in which the voltage supply is constant but an additional control signal (PWM) is supplied on Pin #4 of the mobo header. In addition to headers for the CPU cooler, your mobo has three CHA_FAN headers, each of which can be configured separately in BIOS Setup - see your manual p. 3-7. For each you specify the Mode it uses, and that depends on which fan type you have connected to that header. So you CAN use either of these types, but you are probably better to get the newer PWM type for all.

There are also lots of fans now with lights of three types built into their frames, and that can add issues for power requirements and cable connections. But Noctua does not make any of those, so they are not issues for you.

For electrical power, Watts = Volts x Amps. And in fan specs, they mean MAX Watts and MAX volts when the fan is supplied with the full 12 VDC power (and a PWM signal to run full speed for the newer design). In general (and this does apply to all your CHA_FAN headers) they will supply up to 12 VDC and up to 1 A (that's 12 Watts) per header.

See the complete lineup of Noctua fans here

https://noctua.at/en/products/fan

That is a summary table of major max (at full speed) specs including noise in dBA, air flow in m³/hr, and backpressure in mm water. To convert air flow in m³/hr to CFM, 100 m³/hr = 58.86 CFM. The air flow spec is for the fan running full speed with virtually no backpressure restricting that air flow. But as restrictions are placed in the air flow path, the fan experiences a backpressure to push against and the actual air flow is reduced. Above the max specified backpressure (in mm water), the fan effectively can produce NO airflow. If you were to sketch a graph of air flow versus backpressure, it would be VERY roughly a straight line from max airflow at no backpressure down to no airflow at the max pressure specified. Fan designs can be optimized for two types of applications. Some maximize air flow at very low backpressures (0 to 2 mm water, typical in case ventilation uses) but cannot push air through a more restrictive area. Others are optimized to continue to push air against higher backpressures (2.5 to 4.5 mm water) and are suited to finned heat exchangers and radiators.

In that summary table if you click on any one fan name in the "Product" column you will get to its complete details. Their regular line is the one in two-tone browns, and they include ones with 3-pin and 4-pin (PWM designations) designs, some designed for lower max speed, and a few specialties with thin bodies or odd supply voltages. The older (and slightly cheaper) Redux line in two-tone greys is similar but less extensive. Their Industrial PPC line (iPPC) are high-performance fans (in two ranges) delivering higher max air flows, using more electrical power and generating more noise.

You said you are getting "3 of the 140mm and 1 of the 120mm " without being more specific. Limiting this to PWM Models, the table indicates the only regular 140 mm model is the NF-A14 PWM, with max air flow 140 m³/hr (82 CFM) generating 24.6 dBA noise and able to achieve a max backpressure of 2.1 mm water for no airflow. The detailed specs show it uses max 0.13 A for this. The comparable NF-P14s-redux 1500 PWM older model delivers max 134 m³/hr (78 CFM) at 25.8dBA noise. max 1.9 mm water, max current 0.20 A. The high-performance NF-A14 industrial PPC-2000 PWM model can deliver max 182 m³/hr (107 CFM) at 31.5 dBA noise, max pressure 4.2 mm water, max current 0.18A. It higher-performance cousin, the -3000 rpm PWM model, can do 269 m³/hr (158 CFM) at 41.3 dBA, max 10.5m water, max 0.55A.

In the 120 mm size, the specs look like
NF-A12x25 PWM 102 m³/hr (55 CFM) at 22.6 dBA, max 2.3 mm water, max 0.14 A
NF-F12 PWM 93 m³/hr (60 CFM) at 22.6 dBA, max 2.3 mm water, max 0.05 A
NF-P12 redux-1700 PWM 120 m³/hr (71 CFM) at 25.1 dBA, max 2.8 mm water, max 0.09 A
NF-F12 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 122 m³/hr (72 CFM) at 29.7 dBA, max 3.9 mm water, max 0.10 A
NF-F12 industrialPPC-3000 PWM 187 m³/hr (110 CFM) at 43.5 dBA, max 7.6 mm water, max 0.30 A

I should point out to you that there is an important factor that you cannot predict from these specs. The automatic fan control system normally used by a mobo CHA_FAN header decides what speed the fan should run according to a TEMPERATURE measured by a sensor on the mobo. A "better" fan design can generate the SAME air flow (and hence heat removal) at slightly lower speed and noise and current consumption. So if you want extra noise, a higher-performance fan that generates that at max speed may NOT run as fast and generate a lot more noise than a lower-performance one running faster.

You have 3 fan headers and plan 4 fans; perhaps you plan to group them as 3 x 140 in one area and 1 x 120 in another, perhaps not. To do that you are best to use a 4-pin type SPLITTER. This is a simple device that allows you to connect two or more fans to the same header. The Splitter has only two types of "arms" or connectors: one ends in a female (with holes) that plugs into the mobo headers, and the others are male (with pins) places to plug in the fans of the group. It merely connects all the fans in parallel to the header power supply, so the total max current for all the fans of the group must fall under the 1.0 A limit of the header capacity. No problem with most of those Noctua fans, although the highest-power 3000 RPM iPPC 140 mm model would not let you connect three to a header. You do NOT need a fan HUB, which is a different device that gets its fans' power from the PSU. That device has a third type of "arm" that must plug into a power output from the PSU. Beware: suppliers use the terms "Splitter" and "Hub" interchangeably, but they are DIFFERENT devices.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: mctrader07

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Yes for all except the 24 V model - do not get one of those.

Some generalizations first. There are two major types of fans, usually called "3-pin" and "4-pin". The 4-pin models also are known as PWM fans, and are a newer design. The older 3-pin fans also are called Voltage-Controlled fans. Each requires a different method of controlling the speed. The 3-pin type requires Voltage Control Mode , aka DC Mode, and it changes the voltage supplied to the fan on Pin #2. The newer PWM type requires PWM Mode, in which the voltage supply is constant but an additional control signal (PWM) is supplied on Pin #4 of the mobo header. In addition to headers for the CPU cooler, your mobo has three CHA_FAN headers, each of which can be configured separately in BIOS Setup - see your manual p. 3-7. For each you specify the Mode it uses, and that depends on which fan type you have connected to that header. So you CAN use either of these types, but you are probably better to get the newer PWM type for all.

There are also lots of fans now with lights of three types built into their frames, and that can add issues for power requirements and cable connections. But Noctua does not make any of those, so they are not issues for you.

For electrical power, Watts = Volts x Amps. And in fan specs, they mean MAX Watts and MAX volts when the fan is supplied with the full 12 VDC power (and a PWM signal to run full speed for the newer design). In general (and this does apply to all your CHA_FAN headers) they will supply up to 12 VDC and up to 1 A (that's 12 Watts) per header.

See the complete lineup of Noctua fans here

https://noctua.at/en/products/fan

That is a summary table of major max (at full speed) specs including noise in dBA, air flow in m³/hr, and backpressure in mm water. To convert air flow in m³/hr to CFM, 100 m³/hr = 58.86 CFM. The air flow spec is for the fan running full speed with virtually no backpressure restricting that air flow. But as restrictions are placed in the air flow path, the fan experiences a backpressure to push against and the actual air flow is reduced. Above the max specified backpressure (in mm water), the fan effectively can produce NO airflow. If you were to sketch a graph of air flow versus backpressure, it would be VERY roughly a straight line from max airflow at no backpressure down to no airflow at the max pressure specified. Fan designs can be optimized for two types of applications. Some maximize air flow at very low backpressures (0 to 2 mm water, typical in case ventilation uses) but cannot push air through a more restrictive area. Others are optimized to continue to push air against higher backpressures (2.5 to 4.5 mm water) and are suited to finned heat exchangers and radiators.

In that summary table if you click on any one fan name in the "Product" column you will get to its complete details. Their regular line is the one in two-tone browns, and they include ones with 3-pin and 4-pin (PWM designations) designs, some designed for lower max speed, and a few specialties with thin bodies or odd supply voltages. The older (and slightly cheaper) Redux line in two-tone greys is similar but less extensive. Their Industrial PPC line (iPPC) are high-performance fans (in two ranges) delivering higher max air flows, using more electrical power and generating more noise.

You said you are getting "3 of the 140mm and 1 of the 120mm " without being more specific. Limiting this to PWM Models, the table indicates the only regular 140 mm model is the NF-A14 PWM, with max air flow 140 m³/hr (82 CFM) generating 24.6 dBA noise and able to achieve a max backpressure of 2.1 mm water for no airflow. The detailed specs show it uses max 0.13 A for this. The comparable NF-P14s-redux 1500 PWM older model delivers max 134 m³/hr (78 CFM) at 25.8dBA noise. max 1.9 mm water, max current 0.20 A. The high-performance NF-A14 industrial PPC-2000 PWM model can deliver max 182 m³/hr (107 CFM) at 31.5 dBA noise, max pressure 4.2 mm water, max current 0.18A. It higher-performance cousin, the -3000 rpm PWM model, can do 269 m³/hr (158 CFM) at 41.3 dBA, max 10.5m water, max 0.55A.

In the 120 mm size, the specs look like
NF-A12x25 PWM 102 m³/hr (55 CFM) at 22.6 dBA, max 2.3 mm water, max 0.14 A
NF-F12 PWM 93 m³/hr (60 CFM) at 22.6 dBA, max 2.3 mm water, max 0.05 A
NF-P12 redux-1700 PWM 120 m³/hr (71 CFM) at 25.1 dBA, max 2.8 mm water, max 0.09 A
NF-F12 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 122 m³/hr (72 CFM) at 29.7 dBA, max 3.9 mm water, max 0.10 A
NF-F12 industrialPPC-3000 PWM 187 m³/hr (110 CFM) at 43.5 dBA, max 7.6 mm water, max 0.30 A

I should point out to you that there is an important factor that you cannot predict from these specs. The automatic fan control system normally used by a mobo CHA_FAN header decides what speed the fan should run according to a TEMPERATURE measured by a sensor on the mobo. A "better" fan design can generate the SAME air flow (and hence heat removal) at slightly lower speed and noise and current consumption. So if you want extra noise, a higher-performance fan that generates that at max speed may NOT run as fast and generate a lot more noise than a lower-performance one running faster.

You have 3 fan headers and plan 4 fans; perhaps you plan to group them as 3 x 140 in one area and 1 x 120 in another, perhaps not. To do that you are best to use a 4-pin type SPLITTER. This is a simple device that allows you to connect two or more fans to the same header. The Splitter has only two types of "arms" or connectors: one ends in a female (with holes) that plugs into the mobo headers, and the others are male (with pins) places to plug in the fans of the group. It merely connects all the fans in parallel to the header power supply, so the total max current for all the fans of the group must fall under the 1.0 A limit of the header capacity. No problem with most of those Noctua fans, although the highest-power 3000 RPM iPPC 140 mm model would not let you connect three to a header. You do NOT need a fan HUB, which is a different device that gets its fans' power from the PSU. That device has a third type of "arm" that must plug into a power output from the PSU. Beware: suppliers use the terms "Splitter" and "Hub" interchangeably, but they are DIFFERENT devices.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: mctrader07

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