Question Does My settup support 144

Jan 13, 2020
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My problem is I am unable to use 165hz with my monitor. It is capped at 120hz.

I have a ROG GL553VE Laptop, and a sceptre e255b-1658a Monitor. these are my specs: https://www.mediafire.com/file/m6l0uiftvsxqbh7/My_PC_info.txt/file

this is my laptop's manual. https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/nb/GL553VW/0409_E11734_GL553VW_A.pdf

Here is my intel Graphics capability things

Intel(R) HD Graphics 630




Report Date: Monday, January 13, 2020
Report Time [hh🇲🇲ss]: 6:43:59 PM
Driver Version: 21.20.16.4599
Operating System: Windows* 10 Home (10.0.18362)
Physical Memory: 16268 MB
Vendor ID: 8086
Device ID: 591B
Device Revision: 04
Graphics Output Protocol (GOP) Version: 9.0.1056
Current Resolution: 1920 x 1080




Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7700HQ CPU @ 2.80GHz
Processor Speed: 2808 MHz
Processor Graphics in Use: Intel(R) HD Graphics 630
Shader Version: 5.1
OpenGL* Version: 4.4
OpenCL* Version: 2.1


* Microsoft DirectX* *
Runtime Version: 12.0
Hardware-Supported Version: 12.0




* Devices connected to the Graphics Accelerator *


Active Displays: 2




* Built-in Display *


Display Type: Digital
DDC2 Protocol: Supported
Gamma: 2.2
Connector Type: Embedded DisplayPort
Device Type: Built-in Display


Maximum Image Size
Horizontal Size: 13.39 inches
Vertical Size: 7.48 inches


Supported Modes
1920 x 1080 (60p Hz)





Raw EDID:
00 FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 0D AE C4 15 00 00 00 00
28 17 01 04 95 22 13 78 02 EF 05 90 54 52 93 29
25 50 54 00 00 00 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
01 01 01 01 01 01 5E 35 80 96 70 38 14 40 2C 1C
24 00 58 C1 10 00 00 18 00 00 00 FE 00 4E 31 35
36 48 47 45 2D 45 41 42 0A 20 00 00 00 FE 00 43
4D 4E 0A 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 00 00 00 FE
00 4E 31 35 36 48 47 45 2D 45 41 42 0A 20 00 1D



* Digital Television *


Display Type: Digital
DDC2 Protocol: Supported
Gamma: 2.2
Connector Type: HDMI
Device Type: Digital Television


Maximum Image Size
Horizontal Size: 22.05 inches
Vertical Size: 11.81 inches


Supported Modes
640 x 480 (60p Hz)
640 x 480 (67p Hz)
640 x 480 (72p Hz)
640 x 480 (75p Hz)
720 x 400 (70p Hz)
800 x 600 (56p Hz)
800 x 600 (60p Hz)
800 x 600 (72p Hz)
800 x 600 (75p Hz)
832 x 624 (75p Hz)
1024 x 768 (70p Hz)
1024 x 768 (75p Hz)
1024 x 768 (60p Hz)
1152 x 870 (75p Hz)
1280 x 720 (50p Hz)
1280 x 720 (60p Hz)
1280 x 960 (60p Hz)
1280 x 1024 (75p Hz)
1280 x 1024 (60p Hz)
1400 x 1050 (60p Hz)
1440 x 900 (60p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (25p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (24p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (50p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (50i Hz)
1920 x 1080 (165p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (120p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (100p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (30p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (60p Hz)
1920 x 1080 (60i Hz)
1920 x 1080 (58i Hz)



Power Management Support
Active Off Mode: Supported


Raw EDID:
00 FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 4E 14 05 0A 00 00 00 00
2D 1D 01 03 80 38 1E 78 3E EE 91 A3 54 4C 99 26
0F 50 54 BF EF 80 D1 C0 D1 E8 D1 FC 95 00 90 40
81 80 81 40 81 C0 D2 96 80 A0 70 38 2D 40 30 20
45 00 55 50 21 00 00 1E B0 6D 80 A0 70 38 2D 40
18 20 35 00 55 50 21 00 00 1E 00 00 00 FD 00 30
A5 BA BA 27 00 0A 20 20 20 20 20 20 00 00 00 FC
00 53 63 65 70 74 72 65 20 4D 32 35 0A 20 01 19

02 03 43 F2 4F 04 05 10 13 14 1F 20 21 22 27 48
49 4A 4B 4C E2 00 D5 E3 05 C0 00 23 09 7F 07 83
01 00 00 67 03 0C 00 10 00 38 3C E6 06 05 01 69
69 4F 68 1A 00 00 01 00 30 A5 00 67 D8 5D C4 01
4E C8 00 02 3A 80 18 71 38 2D 40 58 2C 35 00 BA
89 21 00 00 1E FE 5B 80 A0 70 38 35 40 30 20 35
00 BA 89 21 00 00 1E 01 1D 80 18 71 1C 2D 20 58
2C 45 00 BA 89 21 00 00 9E 00 00 00 00 00 00 8E



* Other names and brands are the property of their respective owners.
 
So, you're saying this is wrong?

https://www.audioholics.com/hdtv-formats/understanding-difference-hdmi-versions

Listen to Glenwing, he's usually not wrong when it comes to display specifications. If he says it supports it, then it does.

Confusing that every source I've looked at indicates otherwise but it's likely there is some reason for that.
Yes, it is wrong unfortunately. HDMI 1.4b contains no technical changes at all, only typo fixes (I ran it through a PDF comparison tool against the version 1.4a document once, just to verify :p). Wikipedia used to say that version 1.4b added support for 120 Hz (citing a youtube video with like 200 views of some random guy saying so), so that's probably where a lot of articles all got their info from.

Just to clear up some contradicting info you may encounter, some people debate about whether HDMI "supports" 144 Hz. The answer can be both yes or no, it depends on what you mean by "support", because a "Supported Format" is a specifically defined term in the HDMI specification, with a particular meaning. 1080p 144 Hz is not a Supported Format (meaning it doesn't have timing parameters defined by the CTA-861 standard, so vendors must define their own timings in the EDID in order to run it, which isn't a big deal). But most people interpret "not a supported format" as meaning "not allowed by the specification" or something like that, which is not at all the case. As additional examples, 2560×1440 and 2560×1080 are also not Supported Formats, but clearly they work just fine over HDMI. So although people may say "it's not a supported format", and that's technically a true statement, the phrase doesn't mean what they think it means in this context. In the casual sense, yes, they are supported formats. They're just not Supported Formats. :p

And just for completeness: any format up to 1080p 144 Hz can be implemented (as a Vendor-Specific Format) as of version 1.3 and above. 1080p 120 Hz was further added as a Supported Format in version 1.4, and 3D formats (including 1080p 120 Hz) were added in version 1.4a.

My problem is I am unable to use 165hz with my monitor. It is capped at 120hz.

I have a ROG GL553VE Laptop, and a sceptre e255b-1658a Monitor.
Try setting a custom resolution. See section 6.3 here: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-connect-to-a-120-hz-display.3268285/
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Despite the fact that in your specs it lists 165hz at 1080p, it is not capable of output to that refresh rate using it's HDMI port. It has no other display outputs so I don't know why they even list that capability. It's wrong.

Your laptop has only HDMI 1.4b, which is capped out at 120hz on 1080p.


HDMI 1.4b

Release Date: October 2011



Specs:

  • Enabled 3D 1080p video at 120 Hz so that each eye can receive full HD (1080p 60Hz—or 120 Hz total) per Eye
Abstract: An incremental change to allow for Full HD (1080p) viewing of 3D content.
Practical Issues and tips: Allows for 3D content to be viewed in full HD.
 
HDMI 1.4 is not capped at 120 Hz, it supports up to 144 Hz just fine.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Also, in some cases the limitation might not BE the transport (ie, HDMI, DP, DVI) but instead might be the monitor or graphics adapter. If the monitor itself doesn't support 144hz over HDMI, then it's not going to work no matter that the display adapter AND the transport standard (HDMI 1.3, 1.4, 2.0, etc.) does.

So a given monitor could support 144hz over Displayport, BUT it MIGHT only support HDMI up to 60hz, or 120hz, because the monitor itself only supports an older standard like HDMI 1.2 etc. So what it can support over Displayport and is expressed as it's maximum capable refresh rate, might not be the case over something other than displayport. At least that has been my experience in quite a few cases, especially if the monitor is an older model.
 
Also, in some cases the limitation might not BE the transport (ie, HDMI, DP, DVI) but instead might be the monitor or graphics adapter. If the monitor itself doesn't support 144hz over HDMI, then it's not going to work no matter that the display adapter AND the transport standard (HDMI 1.3, 1.4, 2.0, etc.) does.

So a given monitor could support 144hz over Displayport, BUT it MIGHT only support HDMI up to 60hz, or 120hz, because the monitor itself only supports an older standard like HDMI 1.2 etc. So what it can support over Displayport and is expressed as it's maximum capable refresh rate, might not be the case over something other than displayport. At least that has been my experience in quite a few cases, especially if the monitor is an older model.
That's a good point too. Although in this case the monitor at least claims to have "HDMI 2.0" ports, so I'm assuming for now the monitor supports the full 1080p 165 Hz over HDMI.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, I wasn't trying to indicate his system didn't support it, just making an observation for future visitors to this thread for clarification purposes.

In reality, I WAS initially going to post that yes, his system SHOULD support that, because I was pretty sure that since the laptop's specifications indicated support for 165hz@1080p to external digital display and since it ONLY has HDMI, that it had to support it, but then second guessed and self tricked myself into mistaking that it didn't due to those specifications indicating on several sites that it didn't. I knew it should, but I felt like maybe I was wrong if I was reading that in multiple locations.

I won't make that mistake twice, or hopefully forget this the next time. Seems though that my increasing case of "old timers" is getting chronic and I sometimes second guess things I would have known for certain at an earlier date. LOL.
 
Reactions: Glenwing
Jan 13, 2020
5
0
10
0
Yes, it is wrong unfortunately. HDMI 1.4b contains no technical changes at all, only typo fixes (I ran it through a PDF comparison tool against the version 1.4a document once, just to verify :p). Wikipedia used to say that version 1.4b added support for 120 Hz (citing a youtube video with like 200 views of some random guy saying so), so that's probably where a lot of articles all got their info from.

Just to clear up some contradicting info you may encounter, some people debate about whether HDMI "supports" 144 Hz. The answer can be both yes or no, it depends on what you mean by "support", because a "Supported Format" is a specifically defined term in the HDMI specification, with a particular meaning. 1080p 144 Hz is not a Supported Format (meaning it doesn't have timing parameters defined by the CTA-861 standard, so vendors must define their own timings in the EDID in order to run it, which isn't a big deal). But most people interpret "not a supported format" as meaning "not allowed by the specification" or something like that, which is not at all the case. As additional examples, 2560×1440 and 2560×1080 are also not Supported Formats, but clearly they work just fine over HDMI. So although people may say "it's not a supported format", and that's technically a true statement, the phrase doesn't mean what they think it means in this context. In the casual sense, yes, they are supported formats. They're just not Supported Formats. :p

And just for completeness: any format up to 1080p 144 Hz can be implemented (as a Vendor-Specific Format) as of version 1.3 and above. 1080p 120 Hz was further added as a Supported Format in version 1.4, and 3D formats (including 1080p 120 Hz) were added in version 1.4a.


Try setting a custom resolution. See section 6.3 here: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-connect-to-a-120-hz-display.3268285/
i already tried this, it says "the custom resolution exceeds the maximum bandwidth capacity."
 
Jan 13, 2020
5
0
10
0
Yes, it is wrong unfortunately. HDMI 1.4b contains no technical changes at all, only typo fixes (I ran it through a PDF comparison tool against the version 1.4a document once, just to verify :p). Wikipedia used to say that version 1.4b added support for 120 Hz (citing a youtube video with like 200 views of some random guy saying so), so that's probably where a lot of articles all got their info from.

Just to clear up some contradicting info you may encounter, some people debate about whether HDMI "supports" 144 Hz. The answer can be both yes or no, it depends on what you mean by "support", because a "Supported Format" is a specifically defined term in the HDMI specification, with a particular meaning. 1080p 144 Hz is not a Supported Format (meaning it doesn't have timing parameters defined by the CTA-861 standard, so vendors must define their own timings in the EDID in order to run it, which isn't a big deal). But most people interpret "not a supported format" as meaning "not allowed by the specification" or something like that, which is not at all the case. As additional examples, 2560×1440 and 2560×1080 are also not Supported Formats, but clearly they work just fine over HDMI. So although people may say "it's not a supported format", and that's technically a true statement, the phrase doesn't mean what they think it means in this context. In the casual sense, yes, they are supported formats. They're just not Supported Formats. :p

And just for completeness: any format up to 1080p 144 Hz can be implemented (as a Vendor-Specific Format) as of version 1.3 and above. 1080p 120 Hz was further added as a Supported Format in version 1.4, and 3D formats (including 1080p 120 Hz) were added in version 1.4a.


Try setting a custom resolution. See section 6.3 here: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/how-to-connect-to-a-120-hz-display.3268285/
Did you select CVT-RB as the timing standard?
yes i did
 

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