Does the core i7 4790k support 4 channels ram of 1866 mhz

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1
I want to know if the core i7 4790k supports 4 of the 1866 mhz ram or not as they say that it doesn't http://ark.intel.com/products/80807/Intel-Core-i7-4790K-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-4_40-GHz. And they say it supports just 2 channels as maximum and 1600mhz
 

Supahos

Champion
Herald
Nov 11, 2013
12,605
11
55,465
1,874
No I don't think any ddr3 is quad channel... Except maybe the ivy e processors? There is around a 2% benefit when max memory is used for quad vs dual channel that's why the idea died on the table... Get a 2x(whatever you need) kit and save a few bucks for same performance
 

dudeman509

Honorable
Jan 23, 2015
3,932
0
12,660
665
It supports 4 sticks of RAM in 2 channels (each channel pairs up 2 sticks). There is no quad channel support on regular Haswell hardware.
 

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1


So i can get 4 sticks of the 1866mhz but they say that the processor support 1333/1600 mhz and they didn't say that it support 1866 mhz how could i know
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
May 27, 2010
14,610
7
87,415
3,534
Official support and overclocking are different matters altogether. If you are unsure of things, check the motherboard manufacturer. They will have provided a Supported Hardware List or Qualified Vendor List that will list all of the ram modules they tested. As long as you match the timings and voltages it should work.

DDR3 3200 and up kits exist, but you have to overclock to reach such speeds, and you may not be stable at the required voltage. 1866 and 2133 are almost guaranteed to work with just the XMP profile the memory has and setup should be a simple BIOS change.

Ivy Bridge E and Sandy Bridge E support quad channel DDR3. Consumer class chips only support dual channel.
 

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1

So i can go with the 2400 mhz without any issues
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
May 27, 2010
14,610
7
87,415
3,534
Most likely, depends on the voltage required by the kit as well. That would be a motherboard/memory kit specific question, really. 1.5V memory is quite safe, however, for maximum stability you may need to increase the voltage slightly. 1.65 volt is what a lot of the performance overclocked memory will be listed at, or higher. Intel recommended a maximum of 1.575 volts in their integrated memory controller, so if you don't want any risk I would stick with 1.5volt kits. DDR3 2400 kits at 1.5 volts won't have the best timings, but they are out there.

Motherboard support list is a good resource and on nicer boards they usually will test some high end kits.

 

synphul

Polypheme
Moderator
Mar 11, 2011
9,478
0
61,160
2,327
It may or may not run 4 sticks at 2400mhz, 1866 should run fine. No mainstream desktop boards offer quad channel memory, not even skylake which is the newest and supports ddr4 on mainstream platforms. Enthusiast/workstation class motherboards found in the 2011v3/x99 for the 5820k, 5930k etc support quad channel memory. The more sticks of ram the harder it can be to reach the top speed of fast ram sometimes.

How many sticks it supports doesn't indicate channels. As dudeman509 said it has up to 4 slots allowing 4 sticks of ram to be run in dual channel, basically 2 sets of dual channel ram rather than one set of quad channel. Dual channel can be enabled/used by running 2 or 4 sticks of ram, quad channel uses a different motherboard and typically has 8 ram slots (2 sets of 4 one on either side of the cpu) capable of running 2 quad channel kits. In order to run quad channel on those boards you have to use 4 sticks of ram at minimum.

Higher voltage memory is usually factory overclocked lower end memory. Having 1.5v 2133 for example vs 1.65v 2133, the 1.65v set is likely just 1866 ram that's been overclocked where the 1.5v 2133 kit is using better ram modules.
 

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1
but the 2400mhz is 1.65 v so you tell me not to choose it and keep safe or ican choose it with a little bit dangerous

 

DonkeyOatie

Champion
Sep 16, 2014
12,141
0
50,960
2,088
I use G.Skill Trident X at 2400Mhz on an ASRock Z97M OC Formula and, although I forget exactly what it was, the memory voltage was OK, and I could push it up further. Mozt Z97 motherboards with good RAM power phases will run at least 1866Mhz, and likely 2133Mhz using an XMP. (Xtreme Memory Profile)
 

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1


I will use asus z97-a please tell me if i can run 2400mhz with 1.65v on it or not and if it will make any proplem with the processor (core i7 4790k)
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
May 27, 2010
14,610
7
87,415
3,534
Yes you are understanding correctly. In a worst case scenario all you have to do is lower the voltage and speed of the kit until it works. Not the end of the world if you get a 2400 kit and end up running it at 2133. You can even try overclocking what you buy and getting more then you paid for.

You are purchasing a top-end overclocking CPU. If you don't feel like overclocking, then get 2133 or 1866 memory. It is what I do, memory performance is a minor factor for gaming, and I don't do that much work on my gaming PC to care for high speed memory.
 

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1


So you tell me not to choose the 2400 mhz with 1.65 v
 

DonkeyOatie

Champion
Sep 16, 2014
12,141
0
50,960
2,088
You are not explaining why you want to use this. I do numerical computation on my computer and the faster memory gives me about 12% speed improvement over 1600Mhz.

If you are gaming, 2400Mhz gives about 5% advantage over 1600Mhz and lower speed memory will perform proportionately.
 

Joe pad

Reputable
Dec 2, 2015
100
0
4,690
1
Thank you all guys after i have seen a video i found that there is no different and i think i will choose the 1866mhz