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Question Does the H97M Anniversary Support GTX 1070 or 1070 ti?

Djoza

Notable
Apr 5, 2020
1,011
132
940
31
yes it supports it.The mobo has pciex x16 gen 3.0 slot which is more than capable of handling it.Just make sure your psu is powerful enough for it and make sure u have the right amount of gpu power cables.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My recommendation would be a resounding NO. Here's why.

First of all, those 500, 600 and 700w CX units were never very good, at all, even when they were new. In fact, they were pretty bad. Not as bad as the Corsair VS units with the orange lettering on the label, but the green label CX units were poor quality and it wasn't unknown for them to also damage hardware. We've seen a number of incidences of this, even among some members of the moderation team here.

Secondly, those units haven't been made in a number of years, which means not only was it not a very good unit to begin with, it's also rather old now. Certainly well past the three year warranty it originally had. The fact that it is both old AND used rather low quality capacitors inside as well, both lend to the fact that it's very likely that this unit is now a ticking time bomb of one sort or another.

Lastly, it barely meets the recommended capacity for the GTX 1070 based on it's labeled capacity (Which it can't even provide because in actuality it has only 456w on the 12v rail), and even if it was a terrific unit that was brand new, it would be well below the recommended capacity for the GTX 1070 ti.

So in the end, if you are going to run either of those cards, you will want to also look at getting a new, and much better quality unit. The PSU is the heart of the system. There is NO other component as important as the power supply and all power supplies are definitely not equal regardless of what their label says.

Read this, and get a plan for a different power supply if you're going to upgrade to either of those graphics cards.

 
Jul 7, 2020
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My recommendation would be a resounding NO. Here's why.

First of all, those 500, 600 and 700w CX units were never very good, at all, even when they were new. In fact, they were pretty bad. Not as bad as the Corsair VS units with the orange lettering on the label, but the green label CX units were poor quality and it wasn't unknown for them to also damage hardware. We've seen a number of incidences of this, even among some members of the moderation team here.

Secondly, those units haven't been made in a number of years, which means not only was it not a very good unit to begin with, it's also rather old now. Certainly well past the three year warranty it originally had. The fact that it is both old AND used rather low quality capacitors inside as well, both lend to the fact that it's very likely that this unit is now a ticking time bomb of one sort or another.

Lastly, it barely meets the recommended capacity for the GTX 1070 based on it's labeled capacity (Which it can't even provide because in actuality it has only 456w on the 12v rail), and even if it was a terrific unit that was brand new, it would be well below the recommended capacity for the GTX 1070 ti.

So in the end, if you are going to run either of those cards, you will want to also look at getting a new, and much better quality unit. The PSU is the heart of the system. There is NO other component as important as the power supply and all power supplies are definitely not equal regardless of what their label says.

Read this, and get a plan for a different power supply if you're going to upgrade to either of those graphics cards.

Would the Toughpower GX2 be a good option? The only thing keeping me from buying a new PSU is to mess something up with the system and wreck the PC. While the graphic card is just unscrew a screw, remove the pins then pull gently. Then plug the other graphic card and re screw. EDIT : I realized I should avoid Thermaltake and Coolermaster. Other option is RM650x
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No. That's a low quality unit that has known issues.

How much, Canadian, can you afford to spend on a power supply realistically?

No matter what, if you want to upgrade to a higher end graphics card like those, you are going to have to replace that power supply. The one you have now isn't going to cut it and even if you used it anyhow and it didn't have problems right off the bat, you absolutely will have problems before long. The only question is whether you ONLY have PSU problems or if something else gets sacked in the process. If you are not able to replace the power supply then you are going to probably need to factor in paying to have somebody replace it for you. That's really all there is to it. Or, you get a lower end graphics card that probably doesn't help your situation much since I'm sure there's a reason you were choosing to upgrade to something like this.
 
Jul 7, 2020
30
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30
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No. That's a low quality unit that has known issues.

How much, Canadian, can you afford to spend on a power supply realistically?

No matter what, if you want to upgrade to a higher end graphics card like those, you are going to have to replace that power supply. The one you have now isn't going to cut it and even if you used it anyhow and it didn't have problems right off the bat, you absolutely will have problems before long. The only question is whether you ONLY have PSU problems or if something else gets sacked in the process. If you are not able to replace the power supply then you are going to probably need to factor in paying to have somebody replace it for you. That's really all there is to it. Or, you get a lower end graphics card that probably doesn't help your situation much since I'm sure there's a reason you were choosing to upgrade to something like this.
EDIT : I realized I should avoid Thermaltake and Coolermaster. Other option is RM650x. Yes I realized, but he said the RMx are good so would this be a good option. Also where can you pay someone to change the parts for you?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
RM650x is a good option. A very good option.

Pretty much any reputable repair shop or systems builder can replace the PSU for you. In a pinch, you could probably even get by with the Geek squad guys at Best Buy, although I rarely recommend using them because they are mostly knuckleheads there.

There are plenty of PC repair and service businesses in most towns, and I'd start by calling around to those and asking what they charge to replace a PSU. Honestly, replacing it yourself shouldn't be all that difficult, but if you think you can't do it, then paying might be the only other choice.
 
Jul 7, 2020
30
0
30
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RM650x is a good option. A very good option.

Pretty much any reputable repair shop or systems builder can replace the PSU for you. In a pinch, you could probably even get by with the Geek squad guys at Best Buy, although I rarely recommend using them because they are mostly knuckleheads there.

There are plenty of PC repair and service businesses in most towns, and I'd start by calling around to those and asking what they charge to replace a PSU. Honestly, replacing it yourself shouldn't be all that difficult, but if you think you can't do it, then paying might be the only other choice.
Whats a reputable service I should call? Also what is their charge?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator

Plenty more instructional videos out there. If you are unable to figure it out after that, then yes, take it somewhere and have it done. Honestly it's not rocket science though. It's LITERALLY unplugging about 7 connections, removing four screws and then putting four screws back and plugging around 7 connectors back in. But, I understand if you're one of those people with four thumbs that tends to have problems with things like this. That's what repair shops are for.
 
Jul 7, 2020
30
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30
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Plenty more instructional videos out there. If you are unable to figure it out after that, then yes, take it somewhere and have it done. Honestly it's not rocket science though. It's LITERALLY unplugging about 7 connections, removing four screws and then putting four screws back and plugging around 7 connectors back in. But, I understand if you're one of those people with four thumbs that tends to have problems with things like this. That's what repair shops are for.
Thanks, I appreciate your help :)
 

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