Question Does This All-in-One Software Exists?

accesscpu_

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May 7, 2019
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I'm in the process of simplifying my PC life and my setup. I'm tired of having 50 programs that all do various things on my system. I was hoping to find a one-stop shop that will do all the below (or at least close to it). Right now, all these wish list items represent a separate app on my old system. And I don't want to reinstall them on the new system I just got. So can anyone recommend a program that does all or most of the following:
  1. Complete hardware info (motheroord model, CPU/GPU info, installed RAM, all various info)
  2. Temp monitoring (specifically CPU temps at a glance, maybe even a chart over time so I can see when it got hotter and why)
  3. HDD scanning and diagnostic (and possibly repair). I usually have various brands, like Western Digital, Seagate, and others all at once. I don't want the clinical scanners anymore. I want one that does it all
  4. Benchmark testing (for when I upgrade or want to compare to other system builds)
 
You say "I'm tired of having 50 programs".

Do you mean that literally?

You list 4 tasks.

What would be wrong with 4 programs....one for each of those things? Too many?

If you insist on ONE program, I doubt it exists.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
I'm in the process of simplifying my PC life and my setup. I'm tired of having 50 programs that all do various things on my system. I was hoping to find a one-stop shop that will do all the below (or at least close to it). Right now, all these wish list items represent a separate app on my old system. And I don't want to reinstall them on the new system I just got. So can anyone recommend a program that does all or most of the following:
  1. Complete hardware info (motheroord model, CPU/GPU info, installed RAM, all various info)
  2. Temp monitoring (specifically CPU temps at a glance, maybe even a chart over time so I can see when it got hotter and why)
  3. HDD scanning and diagnostic (and possibly repair). I usually have various brands, like Western Digital, Seagate, and others all at once. I don't want the clinical scanners anymore. I want one that does it all
  4. Benchmark testing (for when I upgrade or want to compare to other system builds)
I'm tired of having a refrigerator and an oven and a dishwasher and a garbage disposal. I want one device that does all of them in mediocre fashion.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Actually there are probably 3 or 4 programs that will provide 80% of the information you wish to monitor or capture.

Some already listed in previous posts.

I do like BelArc Advisor - free version - for occasional snapshots. Nice overall summary of any given system but not always quite up to date.

However, to have even more control and independence from 3rd party programs and apps I recommend Powershell. Microsoft, free.

And many third party apps, utilities, etc. are often just some user friendly shell that may be running Windows DOS/Powershell commands in the background anyway.

Powershell:

For the most part, I am now using Powershell "Get" cmdlets to extract and present system information.

"Get's" do not change anything and I can often customize the cmdlet to some extent when warranted.

As a starter I suggest "Get-Disk". However there are other related disk cmdlets that can be used as well.

https://dannyda.com/2022/07/17/how-to-use-powershell-to-get-hard-disk-drive-hdd-solid-state-drive-ssd-details-number-id-friendly-name-serial-number-media-type-operational-status-health-status-usage-size-how-to-use-po/

However, to really get into things CIM and WMI can be very useful.

Put into scripts you can further customize what you wish to observe.

You mentioned memory:

FYI:

https://shellgeek.com/powershell-get-memory-usage/

Try

Get-WmiObject WIN32_PROCESS | Sort-Object -Property ws -Descending | Select-Object -first 10 ProcessID,Name,WS

In many cases you can easily copy any cmdlet or script for that matter and paste into the PS> prompt.

= = = =

Key is to determine your requirements with respect to monitoring any given system.

Again, it is very likely that there are a few simple cmdlets that will quickly and easily provide what you wish to know. Plus you can pipe the results to a file or printer or filter into another Powershell cmdlet.

And you can customize and control most of it. Actually quite fun sometimes. Especially when a one liner Get provides exactly what is required.

Just be, as you always should be doing anyway,sure to keep your backups up to date. Especially if you start trying to apply Powershell to change things.

Versus a basic Get- to simple look at something.
 
Reactions: Mandark

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