[SOLVED] Does this build look good?

Oct 20, 2020
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So I'm looking to build my own PC for the first time since my current computer is fairly outdated. I'm looking to build something around the $1700 CAD range.
This is what I've come up with:

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 2.9 GHz 8-Core Processor ($430)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake UX100 38.82 CFM CPU Cooler ($23)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA 1200 Motherboard ($127)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($105)
Storage: Western Digital Blue SN550 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($140)
Video Card: RTX 3070 Founders Edition ($680)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($110)
Power Supply: EVGA BR 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($85)

I don't know much about computers so I'm just wondering if anyone more knowledgable could tell me if there are any issues with the build or not (maybe if you think I should spend more money in a certain area and less in another or something like that). Something I was concerned about was whether or not the Motherboard and PSU will be reliable. They seem to have pretty good reviews but that doesn't necessarily always mean much. I also am not sure if all the parts are compatible or not (although PC Part Picker indicates that they are). Any help is appreciated.
 

Phaaze88

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CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 2.9 GHz 8-Core Processor ($430)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake UX100 38.82 CFM CPU Cooler ($23)
Yeah mate, that's not going to work. If you can't afford a decent cooler for that cpu, then you need to step down to a less toasty cpu.
View: https://imgur.com/YwqWtBb

^10th gen power tables.
PL1 = power limit across all threads at base frequency only.
PL2 = power limit across all threads with Intel Turbo Boost active.
Tau = the time(seconds) that the cpu is allowed to run PL2 before it's forced down to PL1.
The UX100 is designed for up to, but not exactly, 65w; there needs to be some leeway. That cooler can barely handle a Pentium Gold from the list.

Video Card: RTX 3070 Founders Edition ($680)
Power Supply: EVGA BR 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($85)
This is also no-no.
You don't pair a several hundred USD graphics card with a under 100USD psu and not expect to have problems afterward... and if you do, and come back here or some other site, the first thing people are going to point out is the psu.

Those are the biggest flags with the current build.

1700CAD, huh? Hmm...

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($238.95 @ shopRBC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240R RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($150.10 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($126.75 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Team T-Force VULCAN 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Canada Computers)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.50 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1604.27
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 20:50 EDT-0400

There's about a hundred CAD gap from your listed budget, but I did that on purpose as a precaution:
-I don't know what store(s) you're looking to buy from; pricing and availability of parts can vary.
-If there's something you don't care for, like the look of the ram, you can swap it out for a different model.
-The 3070 has an msrp of 665.xxCAD. Shipping + handling, taxes, AIB model... it all adds up.
 

Phaaze88

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Ambassador
CPU: Intel Core i7-10700 2.9 GHz 8-Core Processor ($430)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake UX100 38.82 CFM CPU Cooler ($23)
Yeah mate, that's not going to work. If you can't afford a decent cooler for that cpu, then you need to step down to a less toasty cpu.
View: https://imgur.com/YwqWtBb

^10th gen power tables.
PL1 = power limit across all threads at base frequency only.
PL2 = power limit across all threads with Intel Turbo Boost active.
Tau = the time(seconds) that the cpu is allowed to run PL2 before it's forced down to PL1.
The UX100 is designed for up to, but not exactly, 65w; there needs to be some leeway. That cooler can barely handle a Pentium Gold from the list.

Video Card: RTX 3070 Founders Edition ($680)
Power Supply: EVGA BR 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($85)
This is also no-no.
You don't pair a several hundred USD graphics card with a under 100USD psu and not expect to have problems afterward... and if you do, and come back here or some other site, the first thing people are going to point out is the psu.

Those are the biggest flags with the current build.

1700CAD, huh? Hmm...

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($238.95 @ shopRBC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240R RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($150.10 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($126.75 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Team T-Force VULCAN 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Canada Computers)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.50 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1604.27
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 20:50 EDT-0400

There's about a hundred CAD gap from your listed budget, but I did that on purpose as a precaution:
-I don't know what store(s) you're looking to buy from; pricing and availability of parts can vary.
-If there's something you don't care for, like the look of the ram, you can swap it out for a different model.
-The 3070 has an msrp of 665.xxCAD. Shipping + handling, taxes, AIB model... it all adds up.
 
Oct 20, 2020
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Yeah mate, that's not going to work. If you can't afford a decent cooler for that cpu, then you need to step down to a less toasty cpu.
View: https://imgur.com/YwqWtBb

^10th gen power tables.
PL1 = power limit across all threads at base frequency only.
PL2 = power limit across all threads with Intel Turbo Boost active.
Tau = the time(seconds) that the cpu is allowed to run PL2 before it's forced down to PL1.
The UX100 is designed for up to, but not exactly, 65w; there needs to be some leeway. That cooler can barely handle a Pentium Gold from the list.


This is also no-no.
You don't pair a several hundred USD graphics card with a under 100USD psu and not expect to have problems afterward... and if you do, and come back here or some other site, the first thing people are going to point out is the psu.

Those are the biggest flags with the current build.

1700CAD, huh? Hmm...

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($238.95 @ shopRBC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240R RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($150.10 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($126.75 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Team T-Force VULCAN 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Canada Computers)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.50 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1604.27
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 20:50 EDT-0400

There's about a hundred CAD gap from your listed budget, but I did that on purpose as a precaution:
-I don't know what store(s) you're looking to buy from; pricing and availability of parts can vary.
-If there's something you don't care for, like the look of the ram, you can swap it out for a different model.
-The 3070 has an msrp of 665.xxCAD. Shipping + handling, taxes, AIB model... it all adds up.
Thanks a lot for the help! The main reason I had thought that that CPU cooler would work is because I previously found a prebuilt with the i7-10700F paired with the UX100. Thanks for explaining.
As for the PSU, would you be able to explain what the difference is between a cheaper PSU and the one you suggested? I don't know much about this stuff so I thought that if it had the right amount of wattage for your build that it would be fine.
Also, when it comes to the CPU cooler, I would probably prefer to go with an air cooler rather than a liquid cooler since (from what I know) they tend to be less expensive (apologies if I sound stupid). Would you be able to recommend a good cpu air cooler for this setup?

Thanks again for the help
 
Phaaze has a pretty good build, here are some substitute builds however. Also, a cheaper PSU is a big NO. They have poorer power efficiency, cheaper capacitors and often don't supply the same amount of power as they claim to be. They are a hazard for the rest of your computer components. Never cheap out on a PSU.

While Intel still slightly edges out AMD for gaming, the best bang for the buck and for overall performance, AMD would still take the cake, especially for those on budgets. Here is an AMD build, with the same case you chose:
PCPartPicker Part List: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/dxrb8J

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($268.50 @ shopRBC)
Motherboard: MSI B550-A PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($139.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.75 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1622.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 21:56 EDT-0400

This build does not use a 3rd party CPU cooler, but the Prism one bundled with the CPU. It is enough to cool the CPU here, and allows for a slight overclock.


If you are fine with a substitute case, you can drive the price down. I would recommend an RTX 2000 series card if you want the PC immediately, but it seems scalpers and other individuals have got to them first, and prices are now much higher for these cards than normal:
PCPartPicker Part List: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/rJVvW3

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($268.50 @ shopRBC)
Motherboard: MSI B550-A PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($139.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($91.00 @ Vuugo)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.75 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1603.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 22:03 EDT-0400
 

wi5pa

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May 20, 2012
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Have a quick read on this,

Basically, if your going for a mid tower case then get the ATX motherboard,
Full tower can take a E-ATX or ATX
the Micro and mini ATX are for smaller builds and cases.

Your build and case suits the ATX Motherboard for more space and expendability.
ATX is the Standard size motherboard.
 
Last edited:
Oct 20, 2020
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Phaaze has a pretty good build, here are some substitute builds however. Also, a cheaper PSU is a big NO. They have poorer power efficiency, cheaper capacitors and often don't supply the same amount of power as they claim to be. They are a hazard for the rest of your computer components. Never cheap out on a PSU.

While Intel still slightly edges out AMD for gaming, the best bang for the buck and for overall performance, AMD would still take the cake, especially for those on budgets. Here is an AMD build, with the same case you chose:
PCPartPicker Part List: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/dxrb8J

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($268.50 @ shopRBC)
Motherboard: MSI B550-A PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($139.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.75 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1622.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 21:56 EDT-0400

This build does not use a 3rd party CPU cooler, but the Prism one bundled with the CPU. It is enough to cool the CPU here, and allows for a slight overclock.


If you are fine with a substitute case, you can drive the price down. I would recommend an RTX 2000 series card if you want the PC immediately, but it seems scalpers and other individuals have got to them first, and prices are now much higher for these cards than normal:
PCPartPicker Part List: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/rJVvW3

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($268.50 @ shopRBC)
Motherboard: MSI B550-A PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($139.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($91.00 @ Vuugo)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.75 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1603.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-31 22:03 EDT-0400
Hey thanks for the reply! Thanks for explaining about the PSU. One reason I thought about a 3rd party CPU cooler was because I've been told that the ones that come bundled tend to be much louder. Do you know if that would be the case here?
Also, I'm perfectly fine with waiting a few months for the 3070 to be more widely available so that's not really an issue for me. Thanks for the help, I'll definitely take this all into consideration
 
Oct 20, 2020
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Have a quick read on this,
Ah I see that makes sense. To be honest it doesn't really matter to me as long as everything is compatible
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
To be completely honest I don't even know the difference
In a nutshell, motherboards are about their feature sets, and there are many different combinations.
It can be easy to overspend on a model with features that you'll never use.
If you're just looking to slap in a cpu, ram, gpu, and a few storage drives, a Micro ATX will serve you just fine.

As for the PSU, would you be able to explain what the difference is between a cheaper PSU and the one you suggested? I don't know much about this stuff so I thought that if it had the right amount of wattage for your build that it would be fine.
-It's literal the heart of the PC. You need it to reliably run everything.
-Internal component quality > wattage, not the other way around.
-Gaming graphics cards are the most stressful device in the system for a psu to have to deal with, by a lot.
-It can be the difference between smooth operation, or black screens and forced shut downs/restarts.
-Too often people are seen 'dividing' too much of the budget towards the gpu, or LEDs, etc., that they neglect the most important part of the PC as a result.

Also, when it comes to the CPU cooler, I would probably prefer to go with an air cooler rather than a liquid cooler since (from what I know) they tend to be less expensive (apologies if I sound stupid). Would you be able to recommend a good cpu air cooler for this setup?
The reason for the hybrid cooler was because the 4000D Airflow only has 2 preinstalled fans.
Kills 2 birds with one stone; you get a cpu cooler, and 2 more chassis fans.

I could recommend some air coolers, but you'll likely have to buy more chassis fans anyway with just the 2.
 

wi5pa

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For £30 more id go for the i7-10700k, unless you decide to go ryzen instead

Z490 / b550 motherboard- depending on what processor you get

Go with a 240 liquid cooler like the h100i v2 or the PRO for 2 more fans top of case and good quiet cooling

PSU like everyone has said you cannot go cheap, you should get an 80 plus gold, check out Corsair RM750x

Ram and storage are fine ( easy to buy more in the future if needed)
 
Oct 20, 2020
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In a nutshell, motherboards are about their feature sets, and there are many different combinations.
It can be easy to overspend on a model with features that you'll never use.
If you're just looking to slap in a cpu, ram, gpu, and a few storage drives, a Micro ATX will serve you just fine.


-It's literal the heart of the PC. You need it to reliably run everything.
-Internal component quality > wattage, not the other way around.
-Gaming graphics cards are the most stressful device in the system for a psu to have to deal with, by a lot.
-It can be the difference between smooth operation, or black screens and forced shut downs/restarts.
-Too often people are seen 'dividing' too much of the budget towards the gpu, or LEDs, etc., that they neglect the most important part of the PC as a result.


The reason for the hybrid cooler was because the 4000D Airflow only has 2 preinstalled fans.
Kills 2 birds with one stone; you get a cpu cooler, and 2 more chassis fans.

I could recommend some air coolers, but you'll likely have to buy more chassis fans anyway with just the 2.
Ah I see. Yea I'll probably stick with the Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA 1200 Motherboard then.

Also for the PSU that makes a lot of sense. I had heard before that you shouldn't cheap out on the PSU but I didn't really understand why. Thanks for explaining.

And for the hybrid cooler I didn't even realize it was a hybrid cooler haha but in that case I'll probably go with the one you suggested.
1 quick question though. Does it make a difference if you mount the radiator in the top of the case or in the front?

Thanks again for the help
 

Phaaze88

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Does it make a difference if you mount the radiator in the top of the case or in the front?
It's a pick your poison kind of deal. Typically:
[Substitute slightly in front of better or worse, because there will be a lot of those, and the changes aren't that drastic.]
A)Top exhaust
Worse for the cpu and the components above the gpu, but better for the gpu and devices below it.

B)Top intake
Better for the cpu and the components above the gpu, but worse for the gpu and the devices below it.
This one works to greater effect with blower or liquid cooled gpus.

Front mounted, or vertical radiator - intake, obviously
C)Tubing up
As long as the pump isn't the highest point of the loop, this is ok.
That said, it's still worse for noise(gurgling or 'running water') and longevity compared to tubing down.
Understandably, this one can't be avoided in some chassis; the tubes on hybrid coolers are only so long, and the distance from the radiator mounting bracket in the front to the water block on the cpu varies.

D)Tubing down
The preferred orientation of the radiator.
Better for the cpu, and worse for the gpu and other devices.
Again, this is all minor.
 
Oct 20, 2020
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It's a pick your poison kind of deal. Typically:
[Substitute slightly in front of better or worse, because there will be a lot of those, and the changes aren't that drastic.]
A)Top exhaust
Worse for the cpu and the components above the gpu, but better for the gpu and devices below it.

B)Top intake
Better for the cpu and the components above the gpu, but worse for the gpu and the devices below it.
This one works to greater effect with blower or liquid cooled gpus.

Front mounted, or vertical radiator - intake, obviously
C)Tubing up
As long as the pump isn't the highest point of the loop, this is ok.
That said, it's still worse for noise(gurgling or 'running water') and longevity compared to tubing down.
Understandably, this one can't be avoided in some chassis; the tubes on hybrid coolers are only so long, and the distance from the radiator mounting bracket in the front to the water block on the cpu varies.

D)Tubing down
The preferred orientation of the radiator.
Better for the cpu, and worse for the gpu and other devices.
Again, this is all minor.
Thanks for the explanation.
1 more question. I just looked at the "Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA 1200 Motherboard" on PC Part Picker again and one thing I noticed is that in the "Memory Speed" section, it only shows up to DDR4-2933. Does this mean that 3200 mhz RAM wouldn't work on this motherboard?
 

Phaaze88

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I just looked at the "Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA 1200 Motherboard" on PC Part Picker again and one thing I noticed is that in the "Memory Speed" section, it only shows up to DDR4-2933. Does this mean that 3200 mhz RAM wouldn't work on this motherboard?
The ram will work, but 3200mhz will not be possible. It will be locked limited to the cpu's own memory standard.
Here, for example:
https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199328/intel-core-i9-10900-processor-20m-cache-up-to-5-20-ghz.html

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199316/intel-core-i7-10700-processor-16m-cache-up-to-4-80-ghz.html

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199273/intel-core-i5-10600-processor-12m-cache-up-to-4-80-ghz.html

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199271/intel-core-i5-10400-processor-12m-cache-up-to-4-30-ghz.html

Both 10900 and 10700 can be run at 2933mhz, and both 10600 and 10400 at 2666mhz.
Seems like a waste, but if you were to specifically look for 2933 and 2666 kits, you would find that some 3200s are priced as low as they are... or maybe it would be more accurate to say that the 2666s and 2933s have gone up in price.
 

Karadjgne

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The speeds listed by the motherboard are Intel certified tested speeds, that also happen to be the speeds in a 1:1 ratio with the memory controller. That ratio is important only to temps as tested. The slower the ram, the easier the MC has it, the less heat it generates. Higher speed ram does the opposite, and raises temps and power used, which throws off Intels specs.

But doesn't hurt it physically. My Intel runs great on 1866MHz, even though the MC (it's inside the cpu) is officially listed as 1333/1600MHz.

Both arguments for/against mATX motherboards are valid. With such a large window on the side, the mATX is going to look puny, and cables somewhat tighter bunched. You also get fewer connection choices with mATX vs ATX since board real estate is limited. Less headers means less storage, less usb options, less fan ability.

As such, mATX best argument is for a simple build, it's somewhat cheaper to buy.

Psu. It's the Heart of the pc. It's directly and indirectly connected to and powers everything. You should Never cheap out there, buy the best quality psu you can justify. A $700 gpu is a serious justification by itself, never mind the $1700 total pc that'll be useless if the psu craps out.

If a surgeon offered you the choice of an 18yr old athlete's heart, who'd lived a clean and healthy life for $100k or offered you the heart of an obese 60yr old chainsmoking alcoholic for $80k, would you honestly ever even think of considering option B, just to save a few $$$? A psu is no different to the pc.

Spend the money for a better Grade of psu (quality does not mean size)

Cpu cooler. Basically, the bigger the cpu, the bigger the cooler. And any of those higher core cpus is going to use some power. Power used = heat. With that possible wattage output, you should be looking in the 200w+ area as a minimum, preferably in the 250w range. That means the larger air coolers such as the Noctua NH-D15/S or beQuiet Darkrock Pro4, or 240-280mm AIO's. The bigger the better.
 
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The ram will work, but 3200mhz will not be possible. It will be locked limited to the cpu's own memory standard.
Here, for example:
https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199328/intel-core-i9-10900-processor-20m-cache-up-to-5-20-ghz.html

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199316/intel-core-i7-10700-processor-16m-cache-up-to-4-80-ghz.html

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199273/intel-core-i5-10600-processor-12m-cache-up-to-4-80-ghz.html

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/199271/intel-core-i5-10400-processor-12m-cache-up-to-4-30-ghz.html

Both 10900 and 10700 can be run at 2933mhz, and both 10600 and 10400 at 2666mhz.
Seems like a waste, but if you were to specifically look for 2933 and 2666 kits, you would find that some 3200s are priced as low as they are... or maybe it would be more accurate to say that the 2666s and 2933s have gone up in price.
Ok thanks.
So after all the suggestions this is what I have:
CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($244.50 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Corsair iCUE H100i RGB PRO XT 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($159.50 @ Vuugo)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX B460-H GAMING ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($170.50 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($679.99 @ Best Buy Canada)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Canada Computers)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.5 @ Vuugo)

Does this look good now?
 

Phaaze88

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Ok thanks.
So after all the suggestions this is what I have:
CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($244.50 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Corsair iCUE H100i RGB PRO XT 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($159.50 @ Vuugo)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX B460-H GAMING ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($170.50 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($679.99 @ Best Buy Canada)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Canada Computers)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.5 @ Vuugo)

Does this look good now?
(y)
 

wi5pa

Distinguished
May 20, 2012
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Ok thanks.
So after all the suggestions this is what I have:
CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($244.50 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Corsair iCUE H100i RGB PRO XT 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($159.50 @ Vuugo)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX B460-H GAMING ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($170.50 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($134.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($679.99 @ Best Buy Canada)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Canada Computers)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.5 @ Vuugo)

Does this look good now?
Looks great !!
If you could push your budget just a bit more you could get your original CPU - i7-10700 and it will last several years before you need to spend anymore money for upgrades on it.
Also with the PSU - look to get a modular type ( makes a tidy build and easy to just use the cables you need) ,
Also if posible look to get a 750w

As it is though looks great
 
Oct 20, 2020
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Looks great !!
If you could push your budget just a bit more you could get your original CPU - i7-10700 and it will last several years before you need to spend anymore money for upgrades on it.
Also with the PSU - look to get a modular type ( makes a tidy build and easy to just use the cables you need) ,
Also if posible look to get a 750w

As it is though looks great
Thanks!
I'll have to wait a few months to get a 3070 anyway so I might be able to save up enough for the i7-10700.
Would a 750w PSU be necessary though? PC Part Picker says the estimated wattage is 394w so I thought that 650w would've been enough.
 

wi5pa

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The minimum recomended for a system using a 3070 is 650w, 3080/3090 is 750w, so your running a bit tight.
Just food for thought, but
say in 5 years you upgrade your graphics card to a 3090 or even go for a newer 40 or 50 or 60 series, the 650w PSU you buy now would not be able to use them and youd have to buy another.
 
Oct 20, 2020
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Thanks.
If you don't mind tho there's one more thing I wanted to ask. Do you think something like this:
be quiet! Shadow Rock LP 51.4 CFM CPU Cooler
would be sufficient for the i5-10400? I'm worried about the potential reliability issues that come with liquid coolers and I prefer the way that this type of air cooler looks in comparison to those bigger bulkier air coolers. I was thinking I could add a couple of these: Cooler Master SickleFlow 69 CFM 120 mm Fan
to the case without adding too much extra cost. Would this work and are these case fans decent enough?
 
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Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
If you don't mind tho there's one more thing I wanted to ask. Do you think something like this:
be quiet! Shadow Rock LP 51.4 CFM CPU Cooler
would be sufficient for the i7-10400?
https://www.bequiet.com/en/cpucooler/570
According to be quiet, that cooler is for upto 130w. That's not good enough, if the 10400s PL2 limit has anything to say about it. *Refer to the chart back in my first post.

I'm worried about the potential reliability issues that come with liquid coolers and I prefer the way that this type of air cooler looks.
If you want to stick with an air cooler, I can go along with that - not a big deal.
Revising the previous list...
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($238.95 @ shopRBC)
CPU Cooler: Scythe Big Shuriken 3 50.79 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME B460M-A Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($126.75 @ Vuugo)
Memory: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($72.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Team T-Force VULCAN 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Canada Computers)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 8 GB Founders Edition Video Card ($665.00)
Case: Corsair iCUE 220T RGB Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($129.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($110.50 @ Vuugo)
Case Fan: Corsair iCUE SP120 RGB Pro 52 CFM 120 mm Fans 3-Pack ($98.31 @ Vuugo)
Total: $1632.47
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-11-03 03:02 EST-0500


I was thinking I could add a couple of these: Cooler Master SickleFlow 69 CFM 120 mm Fan
to the case without adding too much extra cost. Would this work and are these case fans decent enough?
Must be a dated model. Cooler Master has newer versions of that on their site, but not that exact model.
Looking to Newegg reviews: this fan isn't that good. Unsurprising, considering how cheap they are, and Cooler Master lied about the rated noise level.


@102938
I saw your other thread on hybrid coolers.
That is possibly the greatest downside with air coolers: The strongest ones are all large; larger heatsink absorbs more heat.
 
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