Question Don't know I'm what I'm talking about

Jun 6, 2020
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Hi

I have a 3750k i5, it's been perfectly fine at running the games and applications I normally use until recently.

I'm not fussed about uber 4k 60fps, I mostly play FM and Total war games. Anyhoot I've got myself a i5 6500 for £30 so quite happy with that deal. However, I'm struggling to find out what motherboard I need or what ram.

I currently have ddr3 and ideally would like to use it rather than spend out on more, however, I see things such as must be ddr3L or ddr3 of a certain voltage. I see motherboards that are skylake, or coffee or something beginning with K'lake.

My ram is corsair, I have 4 sticks that make up 16gb. 1600mhz 1.50v

I'm not looking to scrape the barrel on cost for the motherboard. My current board is an Asus sabretooth thingy. It was a good fit for the 3750k because of the chips auto over clocking but the 6500 doesn't do that and overclocking isn't something I ever bother with. I'd like a good board, rather than I, "this will do board." I'd want a board that I can use straight out of the box as I do have a gen5 to put in, update bios then change to the gen6, if that is even a thing.

I don't use an exclusive ssd but I have a hybrid.

My gfx is nvidia geforce gtx1050 ti.

Many thanks to anyone that can help.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Unfortunately things are a bit backwards right now.

But that does happen from time to time especially if a good deal comes along for a CPU....

What you need to do is to identify some candidate motherboards and then visit the manufacturer's website.

Look at the motherboard's respective specification sheets and there should be some listing of supported components; e.g. CPUs and RAM. Motherboard revision numbers matter and there are often notes in the form of fine print or other caveats.

Look for the QVL (Qualified Vendors List).

Start with your current Asus motherboard. If it does not support the CPU, maybe another model will do so. Be sure to check RAM as you go along. Verify the supported RAM modules and the supported RAM installation configurations.

And do not forget or skimp on the PSU. Upgrades often require more power - an older, well used PSU may not be up to the potential power demands of the system. Especially if gaming or doing heavy video editing, or bit-mining even.

Overall, your requirements are key. Do you want (or need) integrated GPU?

I often refer to the various motherboard User Manuals. Most of the manuals are fairly clear about supported hardware and specific installation requirements. You just need to read the fine print and follow through on any links presented/provided in the User Manual.

Details matter.
 
Jun 6, 2020
2
0
10
0
Unfortunately things are a bit backwards right now.

But that does happen from time to time especially if a good deal comes along for a CPU....

What you need to do is to identify some candidate motherboards and then visit the manufacturer's website.

Look at the motherboard's respective specification sheets and there should be some listing of supported components; e.g. CPUs and RAM. Motherboard revision numbers matter and there are often notes in the form of fine print or other caveats.

Look for the QVL (Qualified Vendors List).

Start with your current Asus motherboard. If it does not support the CPU, maybe another model will do so. Be sure to check RAM as you go along. Verify the supported RAM modules and the supported RAM installation configurations.

And do not forget or skimp on the PSU. Upgrades often require more power - an older, well used PSU may not be up to the potential power demands of the system. Especially if gaming or doing heavy video editing, or bit-mining even.

Overall, your requirements are key. Do you want (or need) integrated GPU?

I often refer to the various motherboard User Manuals. Most of the manuals are fairly clear about supported hardware and specific installation requirements. You just need to read the fine print and follow through on any links presented/provided in the User Manual.

Details matter.
Thanks. My psu should be okay, it cost £100 as I needed it for a dual opteron rig I had a while back. I think I'm going to have to get ddr4 unfortunately. I just hoped to avoid spending £80 on ram but my current ddr3 will potentially damage the 6500 memory controller, allegedly.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"Alledgely" indeed.

That is why you must do the necessary research and, if at all possible, get some confirmations (in writing) by the applicable manufacturer(s). May carry some weight if an RAM is necessary. No guarantees....

Actually that holds for almost anything these days. Much is being done in order to shift blame to the end user...
(Cynicism conceded).

Go to RAM manufacturer websites (PNY, Kingston, Crucial, Samsung) to determine what RAM modules are supported by any given motherboard model/ manufacturer. Remember though that the motherboard manufacturers' respective QVL trumps all. Any RAM spec conflicts are warning signs.

Motherboard FAQs and Forums may likewise reveal some issues or concerns. Read carefully for both what is said and what is not said.

Anyway, plan out the build, list the components, and post accordingly.

Someone may spot a potential problem or conflict - documented or otherwise....
 

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