Question Downloading slows down internet extremely.

Nov 30, 2020
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So whenever someone downloads a game, our entire internet speed slows down to a crawl, we have CL Gigabit Fiber. It was just one person downloading(one game), How does one download manage to siphon most of the bandwidth? Checking Speedtest after pausing download restores normal gigabit speed 880 ~ 930+ up/down. Soon as they started the download again, it goes down to a staggering 20-23 mbp/s. Throttling the platform does nothing.
Everything is laggy (e.x, playing games that needs low ping, downloading, watching videos, using remote programs for work)
This is Epic Games platform and it also happened on Steam. Is it the programs or is it something with my connection/router/modem?
(Peak from Steam is 51 mbp/s, max dl speed I saw from Epic Games is 21 mbp/s) So how does those two manage to bring down a gigabit internet?

Any help is appreciated.
 

Prad_Bitt

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Jul 4, 2020
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So whenever someone downloads a game, our entire internet speed slows down to a crawl, we have CL Gigabit Fiber. It was just one person downloading(one game), How does one download manage to siphon most of the bandwidth? Checking Speedtest after pausing download restores normal gigabit speed 880 ~ 930+ up/down. Soon as they started the download again, it goes down to a staggering 20-23 mbp/s. Throttling the platform does nothing.
Everything is laggy (e.x, playing games that needs low ping, downloading, watching videos, using remote programs for work)
This is Epic Games platform and it also happened on Steam. Is it the programs or is it something with my connection/router/modem?
(Peak from Steam is 51 mbp/s, max dl speed I saw from Epic Games is 21 mbp/s) So how does those two manage to bring down a gigabit internet?

Any help is appreciated.
Steam and Epic both show MBps. Your internet speed is Mbps. Bit v Byte. Byte is 8 times bigger. I'm assuming Steam and Epic were downloading at the same time. In this case, 51+21=72×8 = 578 Mbps. Probably the internet is also being used elsewhere on other devices. For example I have 100Mbps internet (gives about 110), if I'm downloading something, Epic and Steam etc it peaks at 110Mbps, and then no one else is able to use it. If someone else starts using it first, then I put the download, then theirs works but my download is slightly slower. Maybe try that?
 
That is how downloads or any file transfer works. They start out at some rate and they try to get more and more and more until they start seeing a lot of errors. The program then concludes that the errors are too much and will drop a small bit until it gets less errors.
That is just how internet works. Even your browser loading web pages works that way but the files it is downloading are small it never gets a chance to ramp the rates to very high values. In addition the many of the game downloaders use special software that runs multiple data streams to improve the rate at which it can increase and decrease this rate. This means game downloaders are even better at maxing out a connection.

This is why almost all of the larger game platforms allow you to set the maximum download rates. Since you have so much bandwidth I would set the limit to say 750mbps....be careful many times you need to set the limit in MBYTES so you need to do the conversion.
 

gggplaya

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Jan 27, 2011
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You need a traffic shaping QOS like FQ_Codel or CAKE. This will allow the router to fairly throttle bandwidth to allow everyone on the network to get fair access. But do it efficiently to make use of your full bandwidth.

The problem I found is that for gigabit internet, no ARM router can shape that much traffic to achieve full gigabit speed. You need an X86 router which are very expensive off the shelf. Or if you can build computers, you can build an x86 router for cheap with spare parts and a low power x86 processor and load OpenWRT onto it. That's what I did, and my home internet is lag free.

Cheapest x86 router you can buy is the Seed studio Odyssey, which has 2 intel ethernet ports. You have to manually load OpenWRT onto it. https://www.seeedstudio.com/Odyssey-Blue-J4105-128GB-p-4668.html
 
Last edited:

kanewolf

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You need a traffic shaping QOS like FQ_Codel or CAKE. This will allow the router to fairly throttle bandwidth to allow everyone on the network to get fair access. But do it efficiently to make use of your full bandwidth.

The problem I found is that for gigabit internet, no ARM router can shape that much traffic to achieve full gigabit speed. You need an X86 router which are very expensive off the shelf. Or if you can build computers, you can build an x86 router for cheap with spare parts and a low power x86 processor and load OpenWRT onto it. That's what I did, and my home internet is lag free.

Cheapest x86 router you can buy is the Seed studio Odyssey, which has 2 intel ethernet ports. You have to manually load OpenWRT onto it. https://www.seeedstudio.com/Odyssey-Blue-J4105-128GB-p-4668.html
You would also need to add WIFI and a switch to that router to equal a typical home router.
 

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