Question Dropped a CPU cooler standoff on my CPU while it was properly installed in the socket

RHXZ

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May 20, 2019
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I am not new to PC building by any means but the case that I was working with this time was a tight one and I was installing the standoffs for the Cooler MasterAir MA620P on a B660 motherboard (ASUS TUF) and I accidentally dropped one of the standoffs on the CPU and the height of the fall was from where the rear 120mm fan is (not too high) and it even scratched the CPU heatspreader just a tiny bit, but that is not my concern what I'm worried about is if it damaged the Motherboard's pins since i did not take the CPU out of its socket to check but the PC boots on fine just fine and is running like usual what do you guys think?
 

kanewolf

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I am not new to PC building by any means but the case that I was working with this time was a tight one and I was installing the standoffs for the Cooler MasterAir MA620P on a B660 motherboard (ASUS TUF) and I accidentally dropped one of the standoffs on the CPU and the height of the fall was from where the rear 120mm fan is (not too high) and it even scratched the CPU heatspreader just a tiny bit, but that is not my concern what I'm worried about is if it damaged the Motherboard's pins since i did not take the CPU out of its socket to check but the PC boots on fine just fine and is running like usual what do you guys think?
The socket clamp already puts downward pressure on the CPU. The force of the standoff hitting the heat spreader is not significant, IMO.
 

RHXZ

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May 20, 2019
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If there's no obvious problem, I doubt there is a problem. You have to try pretty hard to damage a CPU in this specific way; it's not like a hard drive that has big spinning physical platters.
I'm worried about the motherboard pins not the CPU that's what has been bothering me
 

KyaraM

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Mar 11, 2022
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Don't see how anything should have been damaged, honestly. Not as if the CPU can move fixed to the mainboard like that, and that's about the only way I can see the pins getting damaged. Also, if you say it works fine, then I really wouldn't worry.
 

Udyr

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Mar 3, 2021
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I've accidentally yanked the CPU trying to remove the cooler (happens sometimes with AMD), bent pins, straighten them out and put it all back together with no issues.

The small scratch will be a reminder of the incident, but the thermal paste will make sure to mask it over.

As others pointed out, the CPU was tightly secured in it's socket. If you're unsure about the pins, remove the CPU and inspect closely with a magnifying glass (if you have one)... but I would not bother since it's working properly.
 

geofelt

Titan
Once clamped down, the socket pins are not going to get damaged, and a scratch on the cpu die is nothing that thermal paste can't fill in.
For future reference, before removing a cpu cooler, run the cpu a bit to warm it up and soften the paste for easy removal.

Since all is running well, you are good.
 
... and it even scratched the CPU heatspreader...
I'd be more concerned about the scratch in the heatspreader...depends on how badly of course.

Even a minor scratch can affect maximum contact of the heatsink on the spreader. It may not be immediately apparent but people do crazy things chasing only 2 or 3 degrees of cooling improvement.

The only way I know to fix it is to lap the heat spreader. Which will more than likely void warranty since it will probably obscure model number, serial number and other markings.
 

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