News Dual Chinese Zen-Based CPUs Beat Ryzen 5 5600X In Multi-Threaded Workloads

wifiburger

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nothing special here, it's not actually anything close to Zen1, there's a bunch of instructions that are broken, missing, or slower vs Zen1

The encryption support is very different since it needs to support China's own encryption & I doubt very much they are going past Zen 1. Even them acquiring Zen1 IP is sketchy at best.
 
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chickenla

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Well whenever a new product comes out we get headlines like "ADLERLAKE ANNHILIATES AND DESTROYS ZENS 3 LIKE BEN SHIPIRO DESTROYING COLLEGE FRESHMEN" when its only a 6%-7% increase in gaming performance.
 
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Alex/AT

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The most interesting thing I see in the article is that Zen could work in a multi CPU system. Just imagine a dual 5950 system ...
Um, you find EPYC working wondrous? EPYC is Zen.

Zen is an x86-based core processing architecture, not a complete CPU. Equipped with necessary subset of bus controllers, it does multi-CPU in EPYC (non-P variants).
Desktop and mobile versions (Ryzen) have this subset cut initially or just disabled of course, some EPYC's (P variants) have this subset either cut, or non-functioning and disabled or just disabled.
I don't remember exactly about HEDT (Threadripper), but as it's EPYC socket and I/O die based, it probably should be able to support multi-CPU usage.
 
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spongiemaster

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Unfortunately, AMD having sold Intel's patents to China will ultimately cause the end of Intel and AMD as viable corporations in the next 5 to 10 years.
No, it won't. AMD didn't license x86/x64 architectures that would allow the Chinese to go rogue and make their own custom x86 CPU's. The core designs that were approved for manufacturing were produced by Global Foundries, which HMC no longer can order CPU's from because they are on the US gov't restricted list. Not only would the Chinese have to reverse engineer the CPU, they would then need to develop their own leading edge foundries. That's not happening in 5 to 10 years.
 
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No, it won't. AMD didn't license x86/x64 architectures that would allow the Chinese to go rogue and make their own custom x86 CPU's. The core designs that were approved for manufacturing were produced by Global Foundries, which HMC no longer can order CPU's from because they are on the US gov't restricted list. Not only would the Chinese have to reverse engineer the CPU, they would then need to develop their own leading edge foundries. That's not happening in 5 to 10 years.
There's enough internals given to the Chinese that it gives them a significant head start (if they aren't already working on stealing it)

While the state department did approve of this, I do fear it will bite us in the tail in the future.
 
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samopa

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Hygon is nothing new, and it's no surprise dual 8 core CPUs would beat a single 6 core in multi core.
The real question here is the price.
If their dual processor @ 8 core system is cost less (considering this is made in China) than an AMD 5600X system, with everything else is similar (RAM, Storage, GPU, etc.), they will have the market and this comparison is valid (similar to compare 12900 to 5950).

Many business company doesn't care about the type of CPU their machine, many of them only care about performance and cost. So if the system have more performance and less cost, they will buy it.
 
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NightHawkRMX

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You can't really get hygon CPUs outside of China, and since they are essentially first generation AMD Epyc server CPU, they are unlikely to be cheap. The silicon is still produced by glofo, which is an American company as well, so they really aren't a "Chinese discount product"
 
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spongiemaster

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There's enough internals given to the Chinese that it gives them a significant head start (if they aren't already working on stealing it)

While the state department did approve of this, I do fear it will bite us in the tail in the future.
I doubt we'll see any new x86 CPU's from China. All the new CPU's coming out of China are ARM based because they don't have to jump through so many hoops. If China's goal is to be technologically independent, why would they choose trying to reverse engineer x86 instead of just going with ARM?
 
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spongiemaster

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I doubt we'll see any new x86 CPU's from China. All the new CPU's coming out of China are ARM based because they don't have to jump through so many hoops. If China's goal is to be technologically independent, why would they choose trying to reverse engineer x86 instead of just going with ARM?
You are right. ARM makes more sense. But if you need to support legacy systems...
 
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goodorbad

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Many business company doesn't care about the type of CPU their machine, many of them only care about performance and cost. So if the system have more performance and less cost, they will buy it.
Perhaps. But who in their right mind would buy a Chinese made computer chip that allows China's government access to their computer and files and secrets?
 
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Um, you find EPYC working wondrous? EPYC is Zen.

Zen is an x86-based core processing architecture, not a complete CPU. Equipped with necessary subset of bus controllers, it does multi-CPU in EPYC (non-P variants).
Desktop and mobile versions (Ryzen) have this subset cut initially or just disabled of course, some EPYC's (P variants) have this subset either cut, or non-functioning and disabled or just disabled.
I don't remember exactly about HEDT (Threadripper), but as it's EPYC socket and I/O die based, it probably should be able to support multi-CPU usage.
EPYC is a multi-chip package with a dedicated I/O core; this doesn't. It also means that, contrary to Intel, AMD didn't put artificial multi-package restrictions in their processors - a dual-Ryzen 5950 would, thus, be quite cost-effective compared with a 32-core EPYC (especially since EPYC hasn't gotten Zen 3 yet).
 
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