Dual ethernet links

Julian33

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Jun 23, 2006
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I currently have a home network (of sorts) but I'm not impressed with the transfer speeds I'm getting. To give you some background info, I have 2 computers - my desktop PC and a server. They are both connected through my router as follows:


Internet
^
| 6mbps
v
-------------> Router <-------------
| |
| 100mbps | 100mbps
| |
v v
Desktop PC Server


The problem is that my router only supports 100mbps, which is pretty slow when it comes to accessing files from my server on my desktop. Even more infuriating, both my desktop and server have gigabit ethernet cards, so I'm thinking of getting secondary NICs for both machines, and setting them up as follows using a crossover cable:


Internet
^
| 6mbps
v
-------------> Router <-------------
| |
| 100mbps | 100mbps
| |
v v
Desktop PC <-------------------------> Server
1000mbps


Before I take the plunge, I just wanted to get some advice as to whether this would actually work or not? Would this still allow me to use the internet connection, but gain the extra bandwidth in communicating between the server and desktop at the same time?

I know another option would be to route the desktops internet through the server via ICS, but not only is my server not always on, but I also want as low latency to the net as possible since I play online games, so the fewer hops, the better.

Thanks!



 

boonality

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Mar 8, 2008
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You can connect those two together with a crossover cable only, but it can easily be done. You will have to statically map the two network cards to the same subnet and it will work fine. (provided you use a crossover cable... not a traditional network cable)
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
Trying to determine why 100mbps isn't enough on LAN? Like boonality said, X-over and statically set the IP, but is there a reason your current LAN speed isn't fast enough Server to host?
 

Julian33

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Thanks for the quick replies!

You might think 100mbps is enough, and I guess it is for the most part. When I'm transfering large files between machines it can be quite slow though. The big reason is that sometimes the connection just hangs - I'm hoping that providing more bandwidth than the HDs on both machines can use will go some way to solving that problem too.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
Sounds like more a problem with your router than the connection. 100mbps should be quite fast enough for most home networks, even when running a NAS for video. Maybe find some network latency tests and tracert to see if you are getting bounced around with your connection.
 

Julian33

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The problem tends to be local when it does happen - it will just hang for 20s or so when trying to access one of the folders on the network. Guess it could still be the router though. It's a horrible BT home hub that isn't in my good books at the moment as it seems to arbitrarily decide to reset itself every now and then.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
At least an easy (and cheap) test would be to use the same NICs used to connect to your router and connect them via crossover. If you have the same problem, its at least one of the PCs. If you notice a substantial difference (in a good way) you know your router/switch/hub is to blame.

Is it a 'hub' or a router? A router/switch creates dedicated LAN segments via switching; a hub is a broadcast device to all LAN segments it connects. (just in case there was any confusion...maybe just my own :) )
 

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