[SOLVED] Dual rx570 vs a better single slot card.

Jun 7, 2020
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I´m wondering if its better to run crossfire 2 rx570 than to buy newer graphiccard.

What are the pros and cons?
 

need4speeds

Distinguished
You can mix brands but you will have to use something like MSI afterburner or maybe AMD's powertune, ect. To set the
clocks the same on both cards. The bottom card will have the fan more open and the top one will bake with the fan blocked.
You will want to put the strongest card in the top spot, the one that runs the coolest and overclocks the most on it's own.
The hotter\slower one should be placed in the 2nd slot.
The overclock will be more limited. Having both cards running the same GPU and Memory speeds will make them run smoother.
If one is a blower style card, maybe it misses the other card, or in the bottom spot at least it doesn't dump heat on the 1st card.

Not all games support crossfire and some don't scale well. You should first check out the games you play and the ones you plan on playing and see for posts or videos on how they run with crossfire. Support for crossfire in the newest games today is not as good as it was in the past.

Crossfire is only worth doing if you already own one card and have the power supply, case cooling, crossfire board to run it.
It's double the heat, and double the power.

In the past i had a HD-3850 and then bought a used HD-3870 and ran "Frankenfire", it ran well. The HD-3870 was in the 1st slot and the HD-3850 in the 2nd slot with a big OC. It ended up that i could overclock the HD-3870 and the HD-3850 even more.
Then it was a reference HD-4870 and later Sapphire Vapor-X toxic 4870's. 7850's and then my current GTX970.
A single HD-4870 reference card ran hotter than the sun at 81C, surprisingly the Toxic's run not too bad.

It's likely better to sell the RX570 and buy something like a RX5700 or RTX2060s or something like that.
 

extreme_noob

Estimable
Ambassador
Crossfire Pros: 2 cards looks cool, you dont have to throw away or sell your old card
Crossfire Cons: Very few modern titles support it, let alone supporting it well, more power draw, potentially higher temps, or louder, two cards =/= double performance.

Overall, if you can afford a better card, I highly recommend just getting a new card.
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
Yeah, multi-GPU solutions are effectively dead in 2020 (and have been for years) when you're talking about gaming. Essentially, for the price of 2 GPUs, you get the performance of somewhere between 1.0 and 1.4 GPUs. And as multi-GPU solutions get less support from the games and less support from the drivers, the former result is far more common than it was five or six years ago. There's even the occasional situation in which your Crossfired or SLI'ed GPUs will perform worse than a single one.
 
Reactions: extreme_noob

madmatt30

Titan
Ambassador
Pointless running 2 cards now, most new titles are dx12 which doesn't support traditional crossfire or sli at all.

Its now called multi-GPU instead and need to be hard programmed into the game engine and no, The newer BF games really don't support it well.
You may get some increased fps running traditional crossfire in dx12 mode but it's just not worth the heat and power draw overheads or the expense of another GPU.
 

need4speeds

Distinguished
You can mix brands but you will have to use something like MSI afterburner or maybe AMD's powertune, ect. To set the
clocks the same on both cards. The bottom card will have the fan more open and the top one will bake with the fan blocked.
You will want to put the strongest card in the top spot, the one that runs the coolest and overclocks the most on it's own.
The hotter\slower one should be placed in the 2nd slot.
The overclock will be more limited. Having both cards running the same GPU and Memory speeds will make them run smoother.
If one is a blower style card, maybe it misses the other card, or in the bottom spot at least it doesn't dump heat on the 1st card.

Not all games support crossfire and some don't scale well. You should first check out the games you play and the ones you plan on playing and see for posts or videos on how they run with crossfire. Support for crossfire in the newest games today is not as good as it was in the past.

Crossfire is only worth doing if you already own one card and have the power supply, case cooling, crossfire board to run it.
It's double the heat, and double the power.

In the past i had a HD-3850 and then bought a used HD-3870 and ran "Frankenfire", it ran well. The HD-3870 was in the 1st slot and the HD-3850 in the 2nd slot with a big OC. It ended up that i could overclock the HD-3870 and the HD-3850 even more.
Then it was a reference HD-4870 and later Sapphire Vapor-X toxic 4870's. 7850's and then my current GTX970.
A single HD-4870 reference card ran hotter than the sun at 81C, surprisingly the Toxic's run not too bad.

It's likely better to sell the RX570 and buy something like a RX5700 or RTX2060s or something like that.
 
Yeah, at least if you are looking at new hardware, for roughly the cost of two RX 570s, you could instead get something like an RX 5600 XT, or maybe an RTX 2060.

A 5600 XT will typically be nearly twice as fast as a single RX 570, putting it on par with the best-case examples of what multi-card scaling could provide. And since most games don't scale nearly that well, the single faster card should provide significantly better performance in the majority of titles.

Plus, the 5600 XT is built on a newer, more efficient process, so it only draws around 150 watts under load. A single RX 570 draws more power than that for almost half the performance, and two of them combined are likely to draw around 350 watts when both are being heavily utilized. In addition to requiring a better PSU for the stable operation of that multi-card setup, it would also be dumping a correspondingly higher amount of heat into your case, potentially causing cooling issues.

And then there's the cost of electricity to factor in. As an example, at the current average price of electricity in the United States, if you were to game for 3 hours a day on average, the pair of RX 570s could cost upward of $25 more a year to run than the single 5600 XT, likely negating any potential cost savings (at least for whoever pays for the electricity).
 

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