End of Life for 25nm-based Intel SSDs Nears

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4745454b

Titan
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They use transistors like CPUs and RAM so yes. It's a bit like the increase in areal density that hdds get. This is what lets us go from 250GB per platter drives like we used a few years ago, to the "monster" 1TB per platter drives that we have now. Pack the bits tighter together, get more space on the drive. In the case of SSDs because there is no platter, this is done with smaller transistors.

What I wonder is how much an issue this is. For desktop users it doesn't matter much. But losing the enterprise drive might be an issue for business's? That and does the size of the transistor really matter? For example, couldn't they just make a 710 series with the newer 20nm transistors? But keep everything else the same so businesses that need a direct drop in replacement could get one? Smaller sized transistors it might even get a voltage/power drop. I would think it wouldn't matter much if they need a new SSD then they could just buy a newer 20nm drive. But I don't buy enterprise type drives so I'm not sure of the requirements.
 

Stealthman80

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all memory is manufactured in the same way as a processor, so yes that's basically true. The thing for memory is, the smaller you go it gets cheaper to make, good news for us with the prices. Bad news is it gets slower and has less endurance....
 

CaedenV

Splendid
Hey Kevin,
We would love to see some articles about some of the failure rates for drives that are currently in the 5+ year range. Has SLC proven to be as durable as promised? Is MLC panning out to be as bad as everything feared? Is it the flash that tends to die, or the controllers?
 

Cy-Kill

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4745454b, June 24, 2013 1:46 PM:
But losing the enterprise drive might be an issue for businesses?
Did you not see this:

'...the enterprise 710 Series. The latter line was replaced by the new DC S3x00 Series...'
 

pjmelect

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When they shrink from 25nm to 20nm they are also reducing the write endurance of the drive. This does matter to enterprise drive users and maybe home users as well. To mitigate this you can get a larger SSD drive, but that is more expensive. I don't see the price of SSD drives reducing though, since Christmas the price has increased.
 
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