[SOLVED] Error code 0x000000e after cloning Win10 to new drive.

JamesMc19

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Sep 27, 2016
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Hi,

yesterday i cloned my old SSD to my new M.2 drive and it seemed to go along without issue and was working fine last night. This morning i turned the pc on and got a blue screen with
"Error code: 0xc000000e
You'll need to use recovery tools"

I have since used a whole manner of different bcd repairs and scans with no success. I seem to keep getting "file cannot be found" when trying "bootrec /rebuildbcd".

Any help on this topic would be amazing, i am really stuck.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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I ended up wiping the old drive after completion as it seemed successful, i realise now that wasn't the best move!

I have a GIGABYTE ab350-gaming 3 with a crucial M.2 CT500P1SSD8.

Would a fresh win10 install be the best option here?
Yes, a fresh install.


After a clone, I always wait a day or two, just to verify all is well with the new drive.

And for future reference:
-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
 

JamesMc19

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Sep 27, 2016
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If you have the choice and ability to do a sector by sector clone, see if it will work; it takes 2-3 times as long and requires a target drive the same or larger than the source.

If that doesn't work or can't be done, try using a Windows 10 install USB to repair the bootloader.
I have been using a usb to try and repair but for some reason it cannot find the files on the C drive, even though when typing the rebuild command it comes up as an option. It's very confusing.

I also went down the route of list the disks and partitions to see if there was an issue there, selected the correct partition, which seemed to be halthy and working. This ended up changing the error from a 0xc0000225 to 0xc000000e but still cannot enter the system.
 

JamesMc19

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Sep 27, 2016
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Okay thank you i will see if i can get any of that to work. As a different solution i have just reinstalled win10 on my old drive so i can access my files on the drive that wont boot just in case i want to completely start fresh and just move my files back afterwards.

Is there anything i can do to check on the boot files from within windows now that i have access?
 

onespeedbiker

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Apr 13, 2019
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I don't have the knowledge to decipher a bootloader, perhaps someone else here does. What brand clone software are you using and what make model m.2 ssd? I had problems using EaseUS cloning ssd to ssd with my laptop, but not my desktop; I found a fix for this using the sector by sector clone.
 

JamesMc19

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Sep 27, 2016
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I don't have the knowledge to decipher a bootloader, perhaps someone else here does. What brand clone software are you using and what make model m.2 ssd? I had problems using EaseUS cloning ssd to ssd with my laptop, but not my desktop; I found a fix for this using the sector by sector clone.
With a failed clone operation, you don't "fix" the bootloader stuff, you redo the clone operation.

What specific drive and motherboard are you working with?

I ended up wiping the old drive after completion as it seemed successful, i realise now that wasn't the best move!

I have a GIGABYTE ab350-gaming 3 with a crucial M.2 CT500P1SSD8.

Would a fresh win10 install be the best option here?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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I ended up wiping the old drive after completion as it seemed successful, i realise now that wasn't the best move!

I have a GIGABYTE ab350-gaming 3 with a crucial M.2 CT500P1SSD8.

Would a fresh win10 install be the best option here?
Yes, a fresh install.


After a clone, I always wait a day or two, just to verify all is well with the new drive.

And for future reference:
-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
 

JamesMc19

Reputable
Sep 27, 2016
53
0
4,540
1
Yes, a fresh install.


After a clone, I always wait a day or two, just to verify all is well with the new drive.

And for future reference:
-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
Weirdly enough that was the exact tutorial i used for the clone, and it seemed to work completely fine once it was done. That's why im so confused as to why its not working now.
 

onespeedbiker

Estimable
Apr 13, 2019
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I have to agree with USAFRet, it makes little sense to try and repair a corrupt clone. OTOH, what do you mean by using the clean install as a tutorial for the clone? The two are entirely different.

As far as doing a clean install, I don't see any alternative now that what would have been the source drive of the clone has been wiped. :)
 

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