Question Ethernet not working but Wifi does

May 16, 2019
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My ethernet on my PC stopped working, but my wifi continues to work? I am at a loss here. Below is what I've done for troubleshooting.

Reset the Ethernet Adapter
Windows 10 Network Reset
CMD -> Run as admin -> Netsh Winsock Reset
Checked Ethernet Port by Plugging Directly to Modem on Laptop and PC, neither work
Checked Cable
Reset the Router and Unplugged Modem
Updated Drivers for Realtek Gaming Family GBE Controller
Uninstalled Realtek Controller and Restarted
Reinstalled Windows 10
Plugged into all ports on the router
Cursed at it

Thanks
 
Last edited:

mtracy1991

Prominent
Nov 6, 2018
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My ethernet on my PC stopped working, but my wifi continues to work? I am at a loss here. Below is what I've done for troubleshooting.

Reset the Ethernet Adapter
Windows 10 Network Reset
CMD -> Run as admin -> Netsh Winsock Reset
Checked Ethernet Port by Plugging Directly to Modem on Laptop and PC, neither work
Updated Drivers for Realtek Gaming Family GBE Controller
Uninstalled Realtek Controller and Restarted
Reinstalled Windows 10
Cursed at it

Thanks
Is the ethernet port on your PC lighting up?
 
May 16, 2019
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The cable is good. I swapped both cables between router and modem still had wifi. I tried different ports on the router. I assume the port on the modem is good, since the wifi still works
 
May 16, 2019
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If none of the ports on your router work and your Internet Service Provider gave it to you call them. If not try factory resetting the router.
I don't think its the ports on the router that are the problem. Since the ethernet doesn't work when directly connected to the modem. I have reset the router and unplugged the modem.
 
Jan 16, 2019
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If you open an command prompt and type:

ipconfig /all

What IP settings do you see on the wired network card?

You should see the same kind of range that you see on your wi-fi card normally for home use it will be 192.168.x.x so for instance your default gateway (your router) might be 192.168.1.1 and your wi-fi card might be 192.168.1.10 your wired network card needs to be on the same range to connect so if you can list the contents of your ipconfig for both your wired and wireless network cards that might help track down the issue.

If you have a 169.254.x.x address then that denotes an issue with DHCP from your router, also check your network card settings and make sure your IPV4 section is set to obtain IP address automatically and obtain dns server automatically.

Seen it many times that someone sets a static IP on their network card for testing something onsite and then wonder why they don't get a connection when they come back to the office.
 
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May 16, 2019
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If you open an command prompt and type:

ipconfig

What IP address does your wired network card show as having? If you see a 169.254.x.x address you have a DHCP issue on the router you should see the same kind of range that you see on your wi-fi card normally for home use it will be 192.168.x.x
Under ethernet, It is 169.254.x.x. So if the issue is the router, why doesn't plugging directly into the modem work?
 

deathcells

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Nov 1, 2012
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Under ethernet, It is 169.254.x.x. So if the issue is the router, why doesn't plugging directly into the modem work?
The whole point of a router is to control network traffic. Use the router for Ethernet as well as wifi set to dynamic rather than static IP unless you have very specific reason for static like running a server
 
May 16, 2019
18
0
10
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If you open an command prompt and type:

ipconfig /all

What IP settings do you see on the wired network card?

You should see the same kind of range that you see on your wi-fi card normally for home use it will be 192.168.x.x so for instance your default gateway (your router) might be 192.168.1.1 and your wi-fi card might be 192.168.1.10 your wired network card needs to be on the same range to connect so if you can list the contents of your ipconfig for both your wired and wireless network cards that might help track down the issue.

If you have a 169.254.x.x address then that denotes an issue with DHCP from your router, also check your network card settings and make sure your IPV4 section is set to obtain IP address automatically and obtain dns server automatically.

Seen it many times that someone sets a static IP on their network card for testing something onsite and then wonder why they don't get a connection when they come back to the office.
I dont have a wired network card, its the Ethernet adapter built into the MoBo, maybe i would see it BIOS?

Here is the ipconfig /all

C:\WINDOWS\system32>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . :
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek Gaming GbE Family Controller
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : E0-D5-5E-E5-52-38
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::f180:d221:7cdc:c13b%4(Preferred)
Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.193.59(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 81843550
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-24-6F-17-AD-E0-D5-5E-E5-52-38
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 1:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 1A-94-F6-B3-87-3F
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 10:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter #2
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 2A-94-F6-B3-87-3F
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Qualcomm Atheros AR9287 Wireless Network Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : E8-94-F6-B3-87-3F
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::45a0:bf91:a5f3:4041%5(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.29(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, May 16, 2019 6:08:53 AM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Friday, May 17, 2019 9:14:22 AM
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 99128566
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-24-6F-17-AD-E0-D5-5E-E5-52-38
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled
 
Jan 16, 2019
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OK as thought the issue is the fact you are not getting a DHCP address on that network card. The modem won't be passing through a DHCP address until connected that's why you don't get one there it will be looking for a PPOE/PPOA username and password before it opens the connection I would think.

Ignore connecting to the modem directly it's not your issue it's a red herring if the wi-fi connection works the modem and router connection are fine, the issue is either with your netword card in the PC, the cable or the LAN part of the router.

Try the following in order:

  1. Go into your network card settings, disable IPV6 by unticking it, go into ipV4 settings and ensure that you have obtain IP address and obtain dns server automatically switched on. If that fixes it great if not step 2.
  2. Log onto your router via wi-fi and check to see that the DHCP server is enabled for LAN connections. I don't know your router I'm afraid to tell you where to look, if you see it is disabled and manage to enable it great if not step 3.
  3. OK this is a workaround rather than a fix but go into your network card settings, ipv4 and give it a static IP address setup with the entries below:
IP Address: 192.168.1.200
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
DNS Server 1: 192.168.1.1
DNS Server 2: 208.67.220.220

Unless you have a couple of hundred items on your network that should work fine, if it doesn't then you have a serious issue with the switch part of your router or the network card built into that PC and it's probably time to think about swapping hardware parts.

Good luck.
 
May 16, 2019
18
0
10
0
OK as thought the issue is the fact you are not getting a DHCP address on that network card. The modem won't be passing through a DHCP address until connected that's why you don't get one there it will be looking for a PPOE/PPOA username and password before it opens the connection I would think.

Ignore connecting to the modem directly it's not your issue it's a red herring if the wi-fi connection works the modem and router connection are fine, the issue is either with your netword card in the PC, the cable or the LAN part of the router.

Try the following in order:

  1. Go into your network card settings, disable IPV6 by unticking it, go into ipV4 settings and ensure that you have obtain IP address and obtain dns server automatically switched on. If that fixes it great if not step 2.
  2. Log onto your router via wi-fi and check to see that the DHCP server is enabled for LAN connections. I don't know your router I'm afraid to tell you where to look, if you see it is disabled and manage to enable it great if not step 3.
  3. OK this is a workaround rather than a fix but go into your network card settings, ipv4 and give it a static IP address setup with the entries below:
IP Address: 192.168.1.200
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
DNS Server 1: 192.168.1.1
DNS Server 2: 208.67.220.220

Unless you have a couple of hundred items on your network that should work fine, if it doesn't then you have a serious issue with the switch part of your router or the network card built into that PC and it's probably time to think about swapping hardware parts.

Good luck.
It must be a hardware issue since none of those worked. I had manually set the Ipv4 before but I think I used the a different DNS. I am beginning to think its the LAN on the router but for all the ports to stop working is suspicious. The ethernet adapter (NIC) is relatively new. I built this computer 2 months ago and with a relatively nice Mobo. The router is also not a on surge protector and I've had a few power surges maybe thats whats caused this.
 
May 16, 2019
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Disable the wireless, open a command prompt and type "ping 127.0.0.1" If you cannot ping the loop-back address then the physical on-board network interface card is defective. You'll have to purchase an add-on nic expansion card.
C:\WINDOWS\system32>ping 127.0.0.1

Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

It looks like it looped. I'm not an expert though. The Ethernet cables are good. I'm thinking its the router?
 

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