[SOLVED] EVGA RTX 2070 XC Gaming questions

crasher6

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Feb 4, 2015
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Hi guys. I had a couple quick questions, one for someone who is well versed in hardware like gpu die numbers. And another for anyone else who owns the specified gpu. I was watching Gamers Nexus video on the "secret Turing gpu" designated as the TU106-400A-A1. That chip was in the XC Ultra 2070. The 2070 Black has the TU106-400-A1. I opened my 2070 last night to reapply the thermal paste and discovered it has the same designation. Is that normal?

Also, the temperatures are very high. In Witcher 3, the hottest I've seen it get is 74c. It generally runs hotter then my previous card (1070 FTW). Is this normal for Turing GPUs or am I just being overly sensitive? Thanks in advance.

Edit: I also noticed that the gpu downclocked itself from 1935mhz to roughly 1800.
 
The gpu downclocks itself when under full gaming load or once temperatures climb above 65c ish.
Have you tried using the WIndows OS "high performance" plan ? Also, check the NVCP settings.

Setting Power management mode from "Adaptive" to "Maximum Performance" can improve performance in certain applications when the GPU is throttling the clock speeds incorrectly. To change this setting, with your mouse, right-click over the Windows desktop and select "NVIDIA Control Panel" -> from the NVIDIA Control Panel, select the "Manage 3D settings" from the left column -> click on the Power management mode drop down box and select "Prefer Maximum Performance". Click over the "Apply" button at the bottom of the panel to apply the changes.



Just check whether doing this still downclocks the GPU ?
 
The A-A1 SKU is a better/higher binned CHIP variant. More than one GPU model will have this variant number. Yours might be the non-overclocked version. No worries here. Also, that 74 C temp is not high. That's a normal GPU temp value.

Which PSU do you have ? How is the airflow inside your ATX cabinet ?
 
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Also, these are the higher-binned, differentiated A-dies of the Turing silicon.

If you'll remember, the company introduced specific A-binned chips for AIB partners to ship with factory overclocks to customers, due to their higher overclockability - and likely, better power consumption profile - when compared to non A-binned dies. This practice was reserved to the company's best, though, in the form of the TU104-400A-A1 die (compared to the TU104-400-A1 dies used in non-overclocked versions of AIB graphics cards).

The company is now seemingly killing this practice by offering a one-off Turing die with no such limitations.
 
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crasher6

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Feb 4, 2015
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The A1 SKU is a better/higher binned CHIP variant. More than model GPU model will have this variant number. No worries here. Also, that 74 C temp is not high. That's a normal GPU temp value.

Which PSU do you have ? How is the airflow inside your ATX cabinet ?
Thanks for the reply. My PSU is a Corsair AX860 and my case is a Fractal Design Define R6. I'm getting a 750D Airflow next week. As for airflow, it's not the greatest but I have two intakes and one exhaust.
 
Also, these are the higher-binned, differentiated A-dies of the Turing silicon. Just for an example, but necessary for the RTX 2070 GPU.

If you'll remember, the company introduced specific A-binned chips for AIB partners to ship with factory overclocks to customers, due to their higher overclockability - and likely, better power consumption profile - when compared to non A-binned dies. This practice was reserved to the company's best, though, in the form of the TU104-400A-A1 die (compared to the TU104-400-A1 dies used in non-overclocked versions of AIB graphics cards).

The company is now seemingly killing this practice by offering a one-off Turing die with no such limitations.
 
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The gpu downclocks itself when under full gaming load or once temperatures climb above 65c ish.
Have you tried using the WIndows OS "high performance" plan ? Also, check the NVCP settings.

Setting Power management mode from "Adaptive" to "Maximum Performance" can improve performance in certain applications when the GPU is throttling the clock speeds incorrectly. To change this setting, with your mouse, right-click over the Windows desktop and select "NVIDIA Control Panel" -> from the NVIDIA Control Panel, select the "Manage 3D settings" from the left column -> click on the Power management mode drop down box and select "Prefer Maximum Performance". Click over the "Apply" button at the bottom of the panel to apply the changes.



Just check whether doing this still downclocks the GPU ?
 

crasher6

Reputable
Feb 4, 2015
6
0
4,510
0
Have you tried using the WIndows OS "high performance" plan ? Also, check the NVCP settings.

Setting Power management mode from "Adaptive" to "Maximum Performance" can improve performance in certain applications when the GPU is throttling the clock speeds incorrectly. To change this setting, with your mouse, right-click over the Windows desktop and select "NVIDIA Control Panel" -> from the NVIDIA Control Panel, select the "Manage 3D settings" from the left column -> click on the Power management mode drop down box and select "Prefer Maximum Performance". Click over the "Apply" button at the bottom of the panel to apply the changes.



Just check whether doing this still downclocks the GPU ?
I'm currently at work, but I'll definitely try that when I get home and update
 

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