EVGA SuperNOVA 1600 P2 Power Supply Review

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Aris_Mp

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All tests were conducted at high ambient temperatures which during full load were above 47C. Only the Cross-Load tests were conducted at 28-30C.
 
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Very detailed review indeed. There isn't really anything that could be covered and it is not. I don't think that there are many PSU manufacturers out there that can test their products so extensively.
 

Aris_Mp

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I had the opportunity to test the 2 kW model (from Super Flower) and it is indeed superb. But it will provide 2 kW only with 230 VAC input since a normal socket can deliver only up to 15 A of current.
 


47C ambients? Must have been sweating your language, please off, or you are language, please me.
 

Aris_Mp

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The PSU is inside a special-made box (hot-box) for the high temp tests.

 


Wouldn't your FLIR show that the box is hot?
 

Aris_Mp

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no point since the box is insulated so from the outside the temperature will be lower. Also if i open the lid to take a snapshot with FLIR the temperature will drop immediately by 5 C at least (ambient) messing with the test.

I already know what happens inside the box thanks to two temperature probes I have installed in it, so no need to use my FLIR on it. However on next review I will try it.
 


Fair enough. It will be excellent when Tom's Hardware adopts a consistent review standard. Yours was one of the best PSU reviews yet. There's other nitpicks I have but they are nothing major like chart/graph formats could be easier to read.

In your opinion everything held up in close to 50C conditions then?
 

Aris_Mp

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"In your opinion everything help up in close to 50C conditions then?"

around 45C is much more realistic. 50C are too much for modern chassis. However when needed I crank up the heat inside my hot box to see how the PSU performs. Like in this case that I deliberately exceeded my usual 45C and went to almost 48.
 

g00ey

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The "Power Specifications" table on the second page is wrong. The third line must be "Maximum Watts" and not "Maximum Volts". Moreover, the Wattage calculation for the 3.3V rail is missing (should be 3.3*24 given that the maximum amperage for the 3.3V rail is 24A, this must be verified). The value 120 (W or VA) must be for the 5V rail since 5V*24A=120 VA/W...

Also note that I'm making a distinction between Watts (W) and Volt-Amperes (VA) although they have the same dimension. The reason is this:

http://electronicdesign.com/energy/what-s-difference-between-watts-and-volt-amperes

I hope you do the same.
 

Aris_Mp

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The max power is the combined max power that both rails can deliver. Hence while each rail can go up to 24 A both of them can deliver only up to 120 W (combined). This means that either the 5V rail can go up to 120 W alone (so zero W for the 3.3V one) or the 3.3V rail can go up to 24 A and the 5V at 8.16 A.

In DC we use Watts. VA is for AC. In DC Watts = VA

As for the max voltage yeap this will be fixed.

 
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