Question Expected Temps for I9-9900ks

Jan 10, 2020
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Have a custom cooled loop (360 rad) for an intel i9-9900ks and can't find much info as what to expect for temps.

I Idle around 23-25C and at full load for Cinebench hit around 72C with all cores running 5Ghz (some spike to 73-74C briefly) and 1.34, 1.35v on the CPU and ~200W power.

Is this high? Normal? Low? What should I be expecting?

Also notice that it jumps from 23C idle to 60C on load fairly quickly and back down quickly making me suspect either CPU heats up fast or IHS contact is not good.
 
That's really good. I just know I used a Noctua NH-U14S on an i9-9900K build for someone else, and it hit 90C under full load Prime95. Had to swap out for a better cooler.

Jumping temps is normal considering the dynamic frequency at a moments notice.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Thanks for the input, I thought idle was fine but the quick jump from idle to 60ish was unexpected used to a more gradual curve.

I might try undervolting it some to see if I can bring it down some, or tweaking speedstep for when it's idle to reduce clocks further.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Don't worry about your temps. If this is really temps you get with a 9900ks that's amazing.



Cinebench is taken from near the end of the run, High temp shown includes high from previous runs as well.
CPU-Z Stress test is not as stressful it seems, but those are the temps after a 5 minute run at 100%

MrN1ce9uy:
Thanks, I was coming from a 4770k so haven't been used to the current behavior, used to never running so high as the 4770k peaked in the high 40's low 50's but guess with double the cores and higher clocks it's to be expected.

Thanks both for providing a baseline for me to go by, was ready to pull it apart and redo the thermal paste and everything wondering if I put too much on
 
Last edited:

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
"Full load" is a popular but non-specific user term which could mean anything, so it's important to be very specific. Games, apps, streaming, rendering, transcoding and most utilities have partial, fluctuating workloads with fluctuating Core temperatures that are not well suited for testing thermal performance.

“Stress” tests vary widely and can be characterized into two categories; stability tests which are fluctuating workloads, and thermal tests which are steady workloads. Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT's (AVX disabled) is ideally suited for testing thermal performance, because it conforms to Intel's Datasheets as a steady 100% workload with steady Core temperatures. No other utility can so closely replicate Intel's thermal test workload.



Note: Click on the AVX test selections that are not greyed out so that all three AVX boxes are checked, as shown above.

Utilities that don't overload or underload your processor will give you a valid thermal baseline. Here’s a comparison of utilities grouped as thermal and stability tests according to % of TDP, averaged across six processor Generations at stock settings rounded to the nearest 5%:



Although these tests range from 70% to 130% TDP workload, Windows Task Manager interprets every test as 100% CPU Utilization, which is processor resource activity, not actual workload. Core temperatures respond directly to power consumption (Watts), which is driven by workload. Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT’s (AVX disabled) provides a steady 100% workload, even when TDP is exceeded by overclocking. If Core temperatures don't exceed 85°C, your CPU should run the most demanding real-world workloads without overheating.

As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX.

Concerning your question regarding "idle", since Windows has dozens of Processes and Services running in the background, rapid and random Core temperature “spikes” or fluctuations are normal and expected, especially during the first few minutes after startup. Any software activity will show some percentage of CPU Utilization in Windows Task Manager, where unnecessary Tray items, Startups, Processes and Services that contribute to excessive spiking can be disabled.

6th Generation processors introduced "Speed Shift" technology in Windows 10, which responds much faster to changes in workload than "SpeedStep" due to having many more Core speed and Core voltage transition levels. This allows the processor to more rapidly complete brief tasks then quickly return to idle, which reduces overall power consumption and increases efficiency.



Since 7th through 9th Generation Speed Shift is twice as fast as 6th Generation, some users complain of Core temperature spikes which can also cause fluctuations in fan RPM at idle. Motherboard manufacturers have implemented BIOS updates that include separate SpeedStep and Speed Shift settings with more flexible fan curves and time delay options.

I suggest reading this: Intel Temperature Guide

CT :sol:
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Thanks for the comprehensive post CT,

Cinebench and Prime 95 without AVX posted similar results, Ranging between 68c and 75c on the various cores. Running with AVX (pushing close to 255Watts) produced ranges of 78c-86c (Except for 1 slight blip to 90c on one core for a split second)

I do have to tweak some of the settings further I feel, including the speed shift which I think is left loose right now. I'll have to read through the guide further tomorrow but it's much appreciated.
 
Feb 24, 2020
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Your temps are amazing as it is, I hit 100c on prime95 AVX disabled in 5 mins, 32-46c idle / light load and 85-90c while gaming...
 

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