Question Experiencing constant ping spikes after buying a new router

Sep 26, 2018
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A bit of context to the situation: Lately anytime I try and connect to an online server for a game, my ping will be start spiking up after only a few seconds of joining the server. It stays in the 100-200ms range for a few moments, comes back down to what it should be, then spikes right back. This happens consistently no matter how much bandwidth is actually being used up. It doesn't matter if it's 4 in the afternoon or 4 in the morning, I simply can't get decent ping when trying to play online. So I dropped 50$ on a TP-Link AC1750 router because surely having my own private connection would fix the problem right? Sadly no, which leads me to believe the issue is with how our modem or whatever internet adapter we have.

Now it's worth noting I still live with my parents so I have very little knowledge as to how our internet and everything is set up. My dad has made it clear he has no interest in helping me with this issue since it doesn't affect him, which also makes contacting our ISP directly (charter spectrum) not an option. I've already done a malware scan and found nothing, and restarting the router only fixes the issue for at most 5 minutes. I've actually dealt with ping spikes for years now, but it's been fairly bearable up until now. I'm basically lost with what to do, and general "ping spike" fixes don't seem to do anything. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Command prompt after pinging google: View: https://imgur.com/3y8s3aZ


Ping tests: View: https://imgur.com/dvFtRIT
 
Not sure did you replace the actual router that is connected to the modem or did you just add a second router. I am unclear if it only did this after you added the new router or if it did it before also.

First step is to get into the modem. There should be screens that show you the signal levels and packet loss and other errors messages. You can look the recommended values up, it is a rather large table that I do not want to post here.

Most problems with connections are packet loss not delays. The most common cause is using WiFi so make sure you are connected via ethernet to test. The next would be if you are overloading your internet connection. If you attempt to download more data than you have paid for the ISP attempts to not discard data when the overload is very short. It will put packets in a buffer and delay them until there is room to send them. This can cause delays.

Since you have already said you can/will not call the ISP any other trouble shooting is not worth the effort. In many cases you can not fix delays even if you find them since they may not be in your ISP network.
 
Sep 26, 2018
3
0
10
0
Not sure did you replace the actual router that is connected to the modem or did you just add a second router. I am unclear if it only did this after you added the new router or if it did it before also.

First step is to get into the modem. There should be screens that show you the signal levels and packet loss and other errors messages. You can look the recommended values up, it is a rather large table that I do not want to post here.

Most problems with connections are packet loss not delays. The most common cause is using WiFi so make sure you are connected via ethernet to test. The next would be if you are overloading your internet connection. If you attempt to download more data than you have paid for the ISP attempts to not discard data when the overload is very short. It will put packets in a buffer and delay them until there is room to send them. This can cause delays.

Since you have already said you can/will not call the ISP any other trouble shooting is not worth the effort. In many cases you can not fix delays even if you find them since they may not be in your ISP network.

I added a second router, but it turns out i missed something. Before to have internet on my pc, i would connect an ethernet cable from my computer to a cat5e port thats conveniently in my room, which is simple. From there it would connect to what i assume is some sort of adapter, which connects to a router which connects to the modem. The mistake I made when adding another router, was forgetting to unplug the cord that was connected the adapter to the old router and connect it to the modem instead. Essentially at first i was connecting a router, to another router.

I dont know if this is gonna fix the problem, but ill just have to wait and see till tomorrow/later today
 
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The thing you call a adapter is likely a switch running other ethernet ports in the house.

If the device you call a modem is actually only a modem you will break all kinds of stuff if you bypass the old router. Even in the very best case you wifi now moves up to your room rather than near the modem. It will affect all the wifi devices in your house.

I can not see what benefit you think you get from having a router in your room. You already have the best option which is a ethernet connection directly to the main router. The second router just makes things more complex. Maybe if you were running vpn or something but I can not see any purpose to the second router.
 

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