Question Experiencing occasional packet loss via one pc but not on another

Mar 29, 2022
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Since a few months I experience occasional packet loss on one pc using an ethernet cable (which also leads to high ping but it is not usable anyways). The wifi and other pcs (using other ethernet cables) don't have the same issue (My problem pc can't use wifi so I cannot verify if this would work on it) .

What I already tried:
  1. Change the router
  2. Change the ethernet cable
  3. Use a rj45 to usb adapter
  4. Reset the router
I am running out of ideas what to try. The problems generally occurs for a few seconds and can sometimes result in the network not working unless I unplug the ethernet and plug it in again (no clue if this is relevant info). I consider replacing my motherboard but thought I would write a post prior doing so.

Thanks for your help!
 
I would leave a constant ping run to the router IP to be sure it is only on your local network and not something strange with a application.

When you say you tried a rj45 to usb adapter does that mean you tried a new ethernet nic. A device that just converts USB to rj45 will not work as ethernet. If you are getting the same failures on different ethernet device then replacing the motherbaord will also not likely make a difference.

In general it is going to be cheaper and easier if you think it is the port to use a USB or PCIE internal ethernet card than replacing a motherboard.

Does your PC connect directly to the router with a ethernet cable or are there in wall cables in between. The most common cause of packet loss on ethernet is a bad cable. There are massive amounts of fake cable being sold and it will work on some machine but not others. Make sure you are using quality cable. It only has to be cat5e but it needs to be pure copper (no cca) and it must have wire size 22-24 (do not use that flat or thin cable).
 
Mar 29, 2022
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I would leave a constant ping run to the router IP to be sure it is only on your local network and not something strange with a application.

When you say you tried a rj45 to usb adapter does that mean you tried a new ethernet nic. A device that just converts USB to rj45 will not work as ethernet. If you are getting the same failures on different ethernet device then replacing the motherbaord will also not likely make a difference.

In general it is going to be cheaper and easier if you think it is the port to use a USB or PCIE internal ethernet card than replacing a motherboard.

Does your PC connect directly to the router with a ethernet cable or are there in wall cables in between. The most common cause of packet loss on ethernet is a bad cable. There are massive amounts of fake cable being sold and it will work on some machine but not others. Make sure you are using quality cable. It only has to be cat5e but it needs to be pure copper (no cca) and it must have wire size 22-24 (do not use that flat or thin cable).
I already did that so I am 100% certain it has nothing to do with what application I use.

No I didn't try a new ethernet nic. So using an adapter where I plug in the ethernet cable and then plug in the usb from the adapter in my motherboard wouldn't rule out my motherboard RJ port?

Yeah it does I also tried a cat5 bc I thought my cable was broken but I can rule that out 100%.
 
The key thing is those adapters just change the physical wires they do not change the way the data is being encoded on the wires.

USB uses a form of serial communication where ethernet is using ethernet. You would need some hardware to convert this. This is kinda like what a cable modem does. You can't just hook up one of those rj45 to coax converters.

A USB ethernet port is pretty cheap, you want USB3 devices to get full gigabit speeds.
 
Mar 29, 2022
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The key thing is those adapters just change the physical wires they do not change the way the data is being encoded on the wires.

USB uses a form of serial communication where ethernet is using ethernet. You would need some hardware to convert this. This is kinda like what a cable modem does. You can't just hook up one of those rj45 to coax converters.

A USB ethernet port is pretty cheap, you want USB3 devices to get full gigabit speeds.
Sorry I am not so sure if I understand you correctly. Just to be sure the adapter below wouldn't rule out my ehernet nic? Or did I use a wrong term for the thing? (sorry if this is the case I normally use them in my mother tongue and could mix things up)

Thanks again

 
That appears to be a usb ethernet nic. It does not appear to be USB3 so it will not get full gigabit speeds.

This is similar to the device I was concerned you were talking about. They make then with other rj45 ports and usb plugs I just didn't find a example.

These devices have no electronics so they are pretty useless but people buy them because they can be a few dollars cheaper than a USB ethernet nic
 

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