[SOLVED] External Windows 10 for my work computer

Vulmaro

Honorable
May 12, 2014
148
3
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Hello,

I have a work computer with non administratative rights running OEM Win 10 Pro. OS requires me to sign in to my working e-mail.

I dont have my own PC so I would like get USB 3.1 adapter to connect Sata SSD which already have another OEM activated Windows 10 OS installed. I am aware of the fact that how OEM licence keys work via motherboards.

My question is, is it possible and safe that I can use deactivated windows 10 externally through my working computer just for gaming ? I don't intend to activate the external windows with my working computers OEM key and won't acces to the internal SSD my working pc have.

Before you warn me it could get me fired, I am aware of the risks. The IT department in my company is just lazy old people fed up with their work and always ignoring any support.

Thank you.
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
I see the registery keys will be different. But If I manage to boot from external SSD, would that cause any licence issues like voiding it or does it cause any other trouble to the internal SSD which my work computer have ?
Honestly, I couldn't say what Microsoft licensing might try to do. Corporate machines typically re-validate their license through a local server. The system, if successfully booted from the external SSD, may attempt to re-validate. YOUR license may be black-listed on Microsoft's database for showing up where it doesn't belong.

If you are successful in booting from the external SSD, Windows may attempt to take control of the internal SSD; writing registry entries and modifying the internal Windows install. We do know that when you install Windows to a new system with multiple drives installed, the OS can become inoperable when the second drive is removed (even though you specifically told Windows to install on the primary drive). I know you're not intending to install Windows, but it does show that Windows will do some pretty stupid stuff on it's own (and never tell you).

-Wolf sends
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
Unlikely for the following reasons.

  1. The OS installed on your SSD does not know the hardware of your work computer. It's registry is going to be completely different from the registry that was created when Windows was installed on the work PC.
  2. More than likely, the BIOS of your work computer is locked down so you could not change the Boot Priority to tell the computer to boot from a USB device.
-Wolf sends

Edit:
The IT department in my company is just lazy old people fed up with their work and always ignoring any support.
Probably because they're tired of people trying stupid crap on work computers.
 

Vulmaro

Honorable
May 12, 2014
148
3
10,695
1
Unlikely for the following reasons.

  1. The OS installed on your SSD does not know the hardware of your work computer. It's registry is going to be completely different from the registry that was created when Windows was installed on the work PC.
  2. More than likely, the BIOS of your work computer is locked down so you could not change the Boot Priority to tell the computer to boot from a USB device.
-Wolf sends

Edit:

Probably because they're tired of people trying stupid crap on work computers.
Thank you for your reply,

BIOS doesn't have any password so I can acces to it, choose a bootdrive.

I see the registery keys will be different. But If I manage to boot from external SSD, would that cause any licence issues like voiding it or does it cause any other trouble to the internal SSD which my work computer have ?

I am not even going to click on it from My Computer to access to it if it is going to be shown there. I think it should be encyrpted so that no one can plug the SSD out then install it to another PC to steal information.
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
I see the registery keys will be different. But If I manage to boot from external SSD, would that cause any licence issues like voiding it or does it cause any other trouble to the internal SSD which my work computer have ?
Honestly, I couldn't say what Microsoft licensing might try to do. Corporate machines typically re-validate their license through a local server. The system, if successfully booted from the external SSD, may attempt to re-validate. YOUR license may be black-listed on Microsoft's database for showing up where it doesn't belong.

If you are successful in booting from the external SSD, Windows may attempt to take control of the internal SSD; writing registry entries and modifying the internal Windows install. We do know that when you install Windows to a new system with multiple drives installed, the OS can become inoperable when the second drive is removed (even though you specifically told Windows to install on the primary drive). I know you're not intending to install Windows, but it does show that Windows will do some pretty stupid stuff on it's own (and never tell you).

-Wolf sends
 

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