Question Failed Cloning leaving SSD unuseable?

May 27, 2020
5
1
15
0
So, I've been looking all over the place for a fix to the issue im having and I havent been able to find anything. I installed an m.2 SSD into my nephews computer and I went to clone the main HDD to the SSD using Macrium Reflect. It failed, and after spending around an hour googling for what the error codes meant and how to resolve them I decided to just to a clean windows 10 install in the SSD. I turned off the PC and unhooked the old HDD and left only the SSD hooked up, and booted from my windows boot media, but it turns out the cloning process cloned the system reserved partition or volume to the SSD already, so windows 10 wont do an install onto it, and furthermore, I cannot, by trying any method I've come across find a way to get rid of the partition or volume in any way...on top of that, I also converted the volume to a dynamic volume, is this SSD now just bricked and useless? Or is there some way to get rid of this partition without just having to get a new SSD?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
124,807
4,127
159,940
19,598
After the failed clone, and you're doing a full reinstall?

Booting from a valid Win 10 boot USB, you should be able to DELETE whatever partitions are on that drive.

But, for the clone...
What is the specific target drive?

I'd try the clone again and see what happens.

-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
 
May 27, 2020
5
1
15
0
Yeah, I attempted to delete the partition on the boot media, but its greyed out whenever I select that drive. I've tried the cloning process multiple times, I'd click the 'Clone' button, wait a bit, and then it would error. However, since I foolishly converted the drive to a dynamic drive, Macrium wont let me clone anything else to it, so I can't even try to finish the process.

Everytime I attempt to use diskpart function to clean the new drive, or delete the overrides, nothing works.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
124,807
4,127
159,940
19,598
Yeah, I attempted to delete the partition on the boot media, but its greyed out whenever I select that drive. I've tried the cloning process multiple times, I'd click the 'Clone' button, wait a bit, and then it would error. However, since I foolishly converted the drive to a dynamic drive, Macrium wont let me clone anything else to it, so I can't even try to finish the process.

Everytime I attempt to use diskpart function to clean the new drive, or delete the overrides, nothing works.
Can you return the drive to original operating condition, without the new drive?

Commandline function diskpart, and the clean command will wipe that drive completely.
Of course, be absolutely sure of what drive you are accessing when you do that, and you cannot
 
May 27, 2020
5
1
15
0
Can you return the drive to original operating condition, without the new drive?

Commandline function diskpart, and the clean command will wipe that drive completely.
Of course, be absolutely sure of what drive you are accessing when you do that, and you cannot
Yeah, I can remove the new SSD and just run on the old HDD with no issues at all, everything works fine and there are no OS errors of any sort, just really wanted to be able to upgrade his hard drive, but it seems like I may have to buy a new m.2, because I seem to have sort of 'bricked' this new one lol.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
124,807
4,127
159,940
19,598
No, a failed clone won't have "bricked" anything.
Possibly it is using the boot partition from the SSD and 'windows' from the old drive, which would mean no wiping the SSD.

Verify what is in your boot order, and have the old HDD first.
Failing that, a USB-SATA dock, and only power up the SD after the system is booted up.
That will let you wipe that drive clean.

Failing that, a Secure Erase from the manufacturers tools WILL do it.
 
May 27, 2020
5
1
15
0
No, a failed clone won't have "bricked" anything.
Possibly it is using the boot partition from the SSD and 'windows' from the old drive, which would mean no wiping the SSD.

Verify what is in your boot order, and have the old HDD first.
Failing that, a USB-SATA dock, and only power up the SD after the system is booted up.
That will let you wipe that drive clean.

Failing that, a Secure Erase from the manufacturers tools WILL do it.

Boot order did the trick! I didn't think to even check that since I'd never even set the new SSD up, but that was certainly the case! Can't thank you enough for your help and that suggestion, I really appreciate it!
 
Reactions: USAFRet

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS