Build Advice Fan/radiator setup in the Nzxt H710

Sep 27, 2019
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I'm gonna build a new pc with the Nzxt H710 case and i was wondering what's the best Fan/radiator setup in it?

In the front i was thinking of putting the Kraken x52 radiator with push and pull and a 120mm fan under it.
In the top i was thinking of putting 2 140mm fans and in the back 1 140mm fan. Is this good or should i go with 3 120mm fans in the top?

Give me any tips you can since this is my first build :)
 
Last edited:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Since your case can take advantage of it, I'd suggest getting a front 360mm AIO mounted there, set to intake. Then you can have the other placements for fans set to exhaust.

You might want to list your specs like so:
CPU:
Motherboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
PSU:
 
Sep 27, 2019
2
0
10
0
Since your case can take advantage of it, I'd suggest getting a front 360mm AIO mounted there, set to intake. Then you can have the other placements for fans set to exhaust.

Okay, thanks. I was thinking that would maybe choke the case a bit but maybe its not that big of deal.

You might want to list your specs like so:
CPU: AMD 3800x
Motherboard: Asrock x570 Taichi
Ram: 32GB 3200mhz
SSD/HDD: Corsair force MP510 980gb / Seagate Barracuda 4tb
GPU: rtx 2080 or 2080 super
PSU: Antec hcg gold 850w
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Cfm is cfm. That doesn't change just because a radiator is in the way, the volume of air moved is the same. Static pressure is what's affected, which is the immediate presence of air in another spot. So with a 240mm rad and 120mm fan under it, yes, there will be slightly more ambient temp air shoved towards the underneath of the gpu, but once the exhausts draw really kicks in, the block of air provided behind a 360mm rad is going to move there too. You end up with @ 2-3°C difference in gpu temps at high loads, which honestly is chump change and won't affect anything.

The difference to the cpu depends on the loads. Most ppl assume temps are an attribute of the cooler, but they really aren't. They are a result of capacity vrs load according to curve. A 240mm rad has @ 200w capacity. Assume that at 70°C it hits 200w. For simplicity, assume a straight line, so at 150w load, the cpu is at 55°C. With a 360mm rad, it's capacity is @ 350w at 70°C. So with a 150w load, that'd put °C closer to 40. All that depends on the efficiency and effectiveness of the fans, that'll change from one vendor to another, and changes actual temp-load curves, but theory is same.

If you never use over @ 100w, then a 240mm is fine, there'll be no advantage to a larger capacity rad other than the ability to turn fan speeds down considerably (noise factor) which reduces efficiency of the rad, making them equal (ish). If pushing higher loads, the larger the capacity, (with equitable fan outputs) means lower overall temps.

Very basic theory of a considerably complex concept.

I currently run a Cryorig R1. 250w capacity. I7 @4.6GHz. I can hit @ 150-175w loads ±. Gaming temp 55°C, max load 70°C, quite noticeable fan noise. My prior cooler was a nzxt x61 280mm rad, @ 350w capacity. Gaming temps 55°C, max load 70°C. Cpu @ 4.9GHz, 200w+ load. Noticeably quieter and lower fan speeds on the x61, even though both are 2x 140mm fan setups.

You may or may not see much of any temp differences in normal loads, but push the cpu towards limits and you'll get far more from the larger rad overall than the smaller rad, other than just temps.
 

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