[SOLVED] Fans setup suggestions?

Jul 21, 2019
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My case configuration is like this: a 240mm AIO in the front, a normal 120mm fan also in the front, two 120mm fans in the top and one in the back. Which fans should I use as an intake and which ones as an exhaust?
Thanks
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Make and model of your chassis? You should also include the make and model of the fans you're working with as well as the specs to your build.

List them like so:
CPU:
Motherboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
PSU:
Chassis:
OS:

Ideally it should be intake=exhaust but that's taking into account that all the fans are the same(CFM and static pressure wise).
 
Jul 21, 2019
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Ryzen 7 2700
MSI B450 Gaming Pro Carbon AC
Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO 32 GB (2x16 GB) 3200MHz
Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB/Seagate Barracuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM
Inno3D GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER Twin X2 OC
Sharkoon SilentStorm Cool Zero 750W
SilverStone RL06 PRO
Windows 10 Professional
NZXT Kraken X52
Fans (radiator): Corsair SP120 LED
Fans (case): The ones included with the case
Sorry if I didn't explain properly, I'm kind of a beginner
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
It's OK, you aren't the only person who is a kind of beginner, it's the biggest reason most of us are here, to help.

The general concensus is that heat rises naturally. So with that as a basis, intake fans are set low and in front, and exhaust fans are set high and in back. This will create a wind-tunnel affect, called airflow, of air going in one end and out the other, hopefully picking up heat along the way.

Which would mean the rear and top fans would be exhaust, and the 3x fans in front are the intakes. A fan has 2 sides to it. A pretty side, where all you see is just the fan blades and sometimes the led/rgb rings, and an ugly side where you'll see the wires, the fan motor, the struts holding the fan assembly and the sticker with all the fan motor information. Because of blade design and direction of spin, air goes in the pretty side and out the ugly side. This is important to determine airflow direction as much as fan placement, especially when adding a radiator.

With radiators, fans can be mounted as 'push' or 'pull'. If a fan is mounted pretty side visible, it'll 'push' air through the radiator, if the fan is mounted ugly side visible, that'll pull air through the radiator.

With your setup, for aesthetic purposes and having 3 fans visible in front, you'll want 'push', the radiator mounted inside, all 3 fans mounted pretty side outwards in the front of the case. The remaining 3 fans are inside the case with pretty side facing inwards.

If the front fans are not visible, you could use the Corsair's as exhaust and stock fans as intakes. Which fan you place where doesn't really matter as much as how it's placed
 
Jul 11, 2019
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It's OK, you aren't the only person who is a kind of beginner, it's the biggest reason most of us are here, to help.

The general concensus is that heat rises naturally. So with that as a basis, intake fans are set low and in front, and exhaust fans are set high and in back. This will create a wind-tunnel affect, called airflow, of air going in one end and out the other, hopefully picking up heat along the way.

Which would mean the rear and top fans would be exhaust, and the 3x fans in front are the intakes. A fan has 2 sides to it. A pretty side, where all you see is just the fan blades and sometimes the led/rgb rings, and an ugly side where you'll see the wires, the fan motor, the struts holding the fan assembly and the sticker with all the fan motor information. Because of blade design and direction of spin, air goes in the pretty side and out the ugly side. This is important to determine airflow direction as much as fan placement, especially when adding a radiator.

With radiators, fans can be mounted as 'push' or 'pull'. If a fan is mounted pretty side visible, it'll 'push' air through the radiator, if the fan is mounted ugly side visible, that'll pull air through the radiator.

With your setup, for aesthetic purposes and having 3 fans visible in front, you'll want 'push', the radiator mounted inside, all 3 fans mounted pretty side outwards in the front of the case. The remaining 3 fans are inside the case with pretty side facing inwards.

If the front fans are not visible, you could use the Corsair's as exhaust and stock fans as intakes. Which fan you place where doesn't really matter as much as how it's placed
I hope you can help me aswell. I decided to buy 4 Corsair ML120 PROs. But on startup they sound like a vacuum cleaner. Is there anything i can do about it? And is it normal? Btw im using a Fan Hub from phantek.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
It's not really nice to jump on someone else's thread, but I'll answer anyways.

Yes.
If you are talking about when you first boot up, and are still in bios/post, then yes absolutely they'll be at full speed. The hub has a central control, that comes from software or header etc. This is usually a full voltage/speed situation until cmos sets the fan speeds as directed by the fan settings in bios. If the header is set wide open in bios, no real temp control, then it'll stay that way until windows loads and any fan software or windows settings change the rpm.

This applies to cpu and/or case fans, however it is set up. You can tinker with these settings if you choose to, it's a matter of enable/disable fan control, setting min/max working duty cycle etc but on the plus side, you know absolutely they are working on boot.
 

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