Fans spinning extremely fast, no video feed

Sep 25, 2018
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So here is backstory: one day my motherboard randomly decided to stop working, so I replaced the mobo. Motherboards are 1155 socket, therefore old and I'm using gtx 760. After getting the mobo replacement I tried to boot it buut, my GPU fans run at full speed and there is no video feed. Updated bios to the latest version, nothing changed. Integrated GPU is working fine and there is video feed even if the GPU is connected. Anyone know if its coffin time?
 
How did you verify it was only your previous motherboard that bit the dust? I would consider the graphics card to be suspect after coming out of a computer that developed a defective motherboard.

Switching to a new motherboard of the same make / model can present differences in equipment. You should start by making sure you have the same UEFI / BIOS on the new board, or possibly newer if there were improvements, as it was working for your equipment on the last motherboard. Second, you need to go through the new board's UEFI / BIOS settings pages and configure it as your old one was configured, or at least to the best of your recollection.

Pay attention to the section in BIOS about booting UEFI add-in cards. If your GPU doesn't have a GOP section in it's BIOS, it's not going to be compatible with a pure UEFI boot, but I am under the impression that a GTX 760 should support UEFI boot. You should also try the legacy boot option for your motherboard, just in case, as we don't know the required setting for a generic, unspecified GTX 760.

Was the replacement 1155 motherboard new or 2nd hand? Perhaps the slot is defective? Try the bottom x16 slot on the motherboard.

Make sure the graphics card is fully seated in the board with the clip locked in place to secure the card-edge connector.

Do you have another graphics card laying around you can test in the system? Just a quick swap with a power on should tell you whether add-in graphics are going to work at all. You shouldn't need to boot all the way into Windows, as getting into BIOS with an add-in board is sufficient to determine your system boots fine with a discrete graphics card.

What about the power supply? Is there any reason to suspect the power supply could be problematic at this point? A GTX 760 is going to require significantly more power to run than your integrated graphics on the CPU. You haven't actually explained the reason for the failure of the motherboard, so that still leaves questions.
 
Sep 25, 2018
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Hey, thanks for the reply. I was using everything literally the same before my motherboard died and it was working perfectly. Then after the motherboard died I just replaced the dead one with the other one that had same socket and etc. So the only new thing is motherboard which is even smaller than previous one. I have absolutely 0 recollection of what my settings were not only that, but bios settings, the whole interface was drastically different while this one is old one where you can't even control it with mouse. I tried both GPU slots, both gave same results. I want to know this, when BIOS doesent support the video card but its still plugged in, is it still possible for video feed to appear from integrated gpu? It also could be that this mobo simply doesent support gtx 760 because it's latest bios update was in 2011, while GTX 760 was released in 2013
 
By your own description, you clearly you don't have the same motherboard, so you can't simply assume your equipment should work the same.

What the integrated graphics will do when an add-in graphics card is plugged into the motherboard is up to the BIOS. Normally the integrated graphics should be disabled under those circumstances, but it should be possible to keep the integrated graphics enabled for purposes of extra monitor connections or use of Intel's Quick Sync. BIOS should let you change the initial graphics device used for boot. You would have to select the integrated graphics if that's what you wanted to use as your primary when the GTX 760 is installed.

Since you make no mention of testing it yourself, or having had your equipment professionally tested after your system stopped working, I really think you need to start by going through it to determine what equipment is good and what equipment is bad. Trying to troubleshoot your GPU may not be your only problem at this point. Again, not knowing why your motherboard died, leaves questions.

You should test the power supply, memory modules, read the SMART status of your hard drive(s), and find some way to test either your GTX 760 or test your motherboard to make sure it's able to boot with an add-in graphics card in it.
 
Sep 25, 2018
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Rams are good, HDD is good, absolutely everything is good. Works to perfection when using integrated GPU, literally 0 problems. But if I plug in gtx 760 it doesent work. I dunno if its my english or what, but its seems like there is missunderstanding between us

 
I think your English is well enough. :)

I'm trying to express that just because your equipment powers up and boots into Windows, doesn't mean it's working 100% without error. There can easily be bit errors taking place in the RAM modules, hard drive, etc. Running tests specifically designed to verify those things is usually done to ensure it isn't happening.

The power supply can be putting out incorrect voltages. Some equipment may function with more tolerance, but it could be affecting the correct working of your graphics card. Without testing the power supply, we can only assume it's working.

Even if you never test any of the other equipment, the most likely causes of the problem in my opinion are either an incompatibility between your graphics card and replacement motherboard, or simply a defective graphics card. The test for that is to swap in another graphics card, or to test your current graphics card in a known good system and see if you can boot with it there. I realize getting a different graphics card to test isn't always a possibility, and the same goes for getting a second PC with which to test the graphics card, but at least you can run with the integrated graphics and should have a system that's usable, if not for gaming in the mean-time.
 
Sep 25, 2018
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Yeah I know the way how to test it for sure. I just wanted to know answer to the question I asked, It's not that I asked if GPU and integrated GPU is installed that I can use both at the same time. I was asking if motherboard's BIOS is rejecting and is not compatible with the GPU at all. Is it possible for operating system to still boot up if you just change VGA/HDMI or amy other cable from GPU to integrated GPU
 
If your GTX 760 supports both legacy and UEFI boot, you should be able to get it working with proper BIOS settings, if the card is not defective.

I really can't say if the motherboard is rejecting the card or not. In 2011, not all equipment supported UEFI, but that would mean legacy may still be an option. Go through the settings and if your motherboard has UEFI options, try it both ways. If it doesn't boot either way, whether your card is incompatible or your graphics card is defective, it's not going to matter as it isn't going to work for your setup without something changing. Booting with integrated graphics and switching to your add-in card is likely not the solution. It doesn't hurt to try it though.

If the graphics card is working fine, you can set your primary device for boot in BIOS and boot with either the graphics card or the integrated. Once Windows boots and has drivers running for both the integrated and add-in graphics, you can plug your monitor into any output you want. You may have to change the display settings in Windows, but otherwise, Windows isn't going to care a whole lot where you plug in your display, so long as it knows where to send some video output.

If the graphics card is failing to work with your BIOS, I'm a bit unsure how it's supposed to be detected and seen by Windows.
 
Sep 25, 2018
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On my previous motherboard the GPU used to start like this: When i turn on the PC, the fans spin at full speed and once the bios loads and goes to windows boot logo, the fans would stop spinning at full speed and then fans were spinning at speed depending on GPU temperature. Now its just full speed no matter what, even when windows are booted up and ofc there is no video feed. So from that my first thought is that motherboard bios has zero control on gpu, the fans are spinning at full force because its supplied from PSU but its not controlled at all by motherboard
 
The motherboard is likely failing to finish the POST process with the GTX 760 installed, most likely because the card is preventing the boot process, so the BIOS for the add-in card isn't being fully read and run through it's start-up to completion, so the programming for the graphics card isn't getting to the point it enters the closed loop cycle and runs it's fans from sensor(s) rather than running from the default fail-safe of 100% fan speed. This makes it look like the card is defective, but that's only an opinion. Again, I would test it before throwing it out.
 

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