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fast please hard psu

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You are unlikely to find specs on it, because it's an oddball, dumpster fire quality unit. If you didn't already buy it, don't. If you did, return it. If you can't, count it as a learning experience and either throw it away or try to sell it and then buy a quality unit from Corsair, Seasonic, EVGA, Antec, Super Flower, FSP or even BeQuiet. Stay away from any unit you cannot find a professional review of.

Just FYI.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3517929/1stplayer-gaming-psu-good-psu.html
 

Saga Lout

Olde English
Moderator
Have you actual evidence of a PSU causing a fire, derekullo. If the manufacturer sues you for a lot of money, you might need to back up your claim.

Alternatively, you could edit your post to a blank and I'll remove it.
 
Doesn't have to cause actual fire but those cheap PSU are certainly hazard to HW they have to supply. I used to repair PSUs and still do it occasionally. All you have to do is to look inside and and you can see the difference in the quality of components used and safety features along with filters etc.
It's actually very difficult to set fire (like in flames) to anything outside the case or outside of it. Fuse in it or to PSU would blow before anything catastrophic can happen unless used in highly flammable atmosphere but than specially insulated electrical equipment should be used.
 

Saga Lout

Olde English
Moderator
I'm fully aware that there are poor PSUs on the market that can outdo a barbecue but we have to be careful when we mention specific manufacturers. The same can be said for laptop and mobile device batteries and the same applies.

Tom's carries a lot of weight in the online advice world and we don't want to lose that reputation in a Court of law.
 

derekullo

Distinguished


Yes actually.

Back in 1999 when I was 13 and had just built my first computer, I was playing the game Tron 2.0 when all of a sudden the game appeared to freeze and a huge cloud of white smoke that smelled of burned electronics filled my room in seconds.

I eventually traced the issue down to a failing/failed power supply.

And so if you subscribe to the "if there's smoke there's fire" theory then that would be evidence of a PSU causing a fire.


Edit: It may have been a bronze quality PSU if that and I may have been overclocking, but the end result was still a smoldering pile of something electronic.

It was a learning experience.

Ever since then I have stuck to gold or higher rated power supplies and made sure my maximum wattage never comes close to exceeding the rated maximum on the power supply.





 

derekullo

Distinguished


I believe Darkbreeze categorized it best as oddball, dumpster fire quality unit.

Technology may have improved since then, but cutting corners has sadly never gone out of style.

It never gives an 80+ rating on any of the pages so I can only assume it doesn't have one.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
80plus ratings are, however, ONLY an applicable metric IF the unit is already an otherwise known and high quality platform. Sometimes, not even then.

Take the EVGA B3 power supplies. Three of four tested failed Aris Mpitziopoulos testing. Aris does the PSU testing for Tom's Hardware and some other sites. He's also part of the Cybenetics labs project that tests power supplies on a variety of categories, and in ways nobody else does.

Those units were all a pass for Bronze 80plus, it's predecessors the B2 series generally managed Silver 80plus in testing even though they too were only technically Bronze units. Even so, all the B3 units EXCEPT for the B3 650w model failed testing or outright blew up.

80plus is only useful OR trustworthy if you already know the platform in use is good AND that it's being built by a trustworthy company, rather than being outsourced by that company to another company, that is not so trustworthy or even "known".

These B3 units for example, were supposed to be built by Superflower, somebody with a good track record of solid units in the Leadex, Leadex 2 and Golden green platforms that have been used on their own and most of the reliable EVGA models for years now. Instead, Super Flower outsourced the building of their platform to RSY instead of Super Flower, and they were not reliable. Then Super Flower pulled the manufacturing back in, supposedly, but after those tests, until I see newer tests to the contrary, I would not trust those models.

Then there are really solid models like the Antec VP-450, which has NO 80plus rating due to lacking active power factor correction and needing a switch to select power factor, which has historically been pretty solid. I know of at LEAST ten of these I've installed in systems more than five years ago which are still running fine today. Probably more.

This is what I think about 80plus as any kind of measuring tool against a unit being good or bad.

https://www.hardocp.com/article/2011/10/04/80_plus_irrelevant_to_you_when_buying_psu/#.VCs8dul0xhE


And this just makes using anything like 80plus, which is an unregulated standard, worthless.

https://www.hardwaresecrets.com/power-supplies-with-fake-80-plus-badges/
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
This guy's power supply was working perfectly find too, until it wasn't.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/26/exploding_computer_vs_reg_reader/


So was every person's who ever had one fail. They ALL work fine, until they don't. And once they don't, it's often too late and the damage is done. Plus, low quality power supplies are capable of INCREMENTALLY causing harm to your hardware through damaging levels of ripple, electrical noise and out of spec voltage regulation, things you can't see but are still there eating away at your motherboard, graphics card and storage devices whether you notice them or not. By the time you realize something is wrong, it is far too late for it to matter.

And that's if the unit doesn't just decide to blow up and catch on fire one day. If that happens, hopefully you are there to do something about it.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Electronics very rarely, if ever, die a slow death. It's almost always an instant death where one single component inside decides to give up the ghost. Sometimes it's a minor component such as a resistor or diode on a filter or thermistor circuit, sometimes it's a main output capacitor that reaches its limits internally and goes bang! Either way, the psu is now toast. This can and does happen to any single electronics device on the planet. There's no getting around it. Quality psu OEMs can only mitigate chances of this happening by use of quality components, quality manufacturing etc. It's the not-so-good manufacturers who skimp by using low quality components with low quality manufacturing processes, low quality inspections etc that eventually increase the odds of death.

Yes, there have been house fires started by unattended psus that catastrophically failed. Rare, but has happened. Most psu fires are nothing more than the arc from a shorting component giving off fireworks that once a certain point is reached, can no longer support the short circuit and quit. Either way, there's smoke and damage that's irreparable.

80+ is an efficiency rating, not a quality rating or even a standard. It's a 3rd party Voluntary Certification that states a particular psu lives upto certain levels of efficiency at its operating parameters. There's many Bronze units that are considerably more solidily built than some Gold rated units.

The point is, the psu is the single most important part of any pc, and often the most overlooked. It's responsible for powering everything and there's no backup, no redundancy, no failsafe. There's a total reliance on the psu to do its job right the first time, every time. Low quality psu's just increase the chance of failure, and whether that failure results in other damage is anyone's guess.

Harry said it best, "Do you feel lucky punk? Well do ya?"
 

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