Question Faulty NVMe SSD

Jun 17, 2021
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Hi,

I have a faulty NVMe Intel 760p SSD connected in my laptop and I think it's faulty because I got many BSOD's and freezing problems until I reinstalled my OS on my SATA SSD (no freeze or BSOD past week), also a constant high pitch noise comes from it's area. I disabled the SATA port from BIOS in hope that the high pitch noise will stop (it's scratching my brain) anyway the SSD showed up in Task Manager and Device Manager. As I said, reinstalled my OS (Windows 10) on the second SSD but I still have a problem with stuttering and input lag.

Could that faulty SSD (which I'm not using, it's not even showing in My Computer disks) be the problem of this? I also thinked that may be a RAM problem, but I put in another stick (removed the other one) and nothing happened, still got stuttering and input lag.

The reason why I'm not removing the NVMe SSD it's because I still have warranty but I can't send my laptop to a service right now, got some exams to take care of, but I will send it after that. :)
 
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I doubt the m.2 is your problem.

To test for a ram problem,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

Possibly, you are having a cooling problem and the noise you hear is coming from the cooling fan.

Run Hwmonitor or such and look at the maximum cpu temperature.
If it reaches 100c(for intel) you have a heat issue and are throttling.

Does the problem go away on battery?
 
Reactions: Stefanovski
Jun 17, 2021
5
1
15
0
I doubt the m.2 is your problem.

To test for a ram problem,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

Possibly, you are having a cooling problem and the noise you hear is coming from the cooling fan.

Run Hwmonitor or such and look at the maximum cpu temperature.
If it reaches 100c(for intel) you have a heat issue and are throttling.

Does the problem go away on battery?
I already tested the RAM with memtest86 (4 passes, twice), no problems were found.

My CPU and GPU coolers were already changed about 2-3 weeks ago. The sound it's not coming from them.

The temps are good, 40-45 degrees on idle, about 75-85 degrees CPU and 55-70 degrees GPU when I'm playing a game.

And yes, the sound disappears when I'm disconnecting the charger and, I think, the stutter and input lag aswell (not tested for a long time, tho).

My laptop was in service for coolers replacement (about 2-3 weeks ago) so I asked the one who was repairing my laptop to check my charger too, because I hear some weird noises (high pitch noise and another one that I cannot explain) when it's plugged in, but he said it was okay, nothing wrong with it. I can still hear that weird noises when I'm bringing the power brick near my ear.
Could the PB be the problem?
 
Jun 17, 2021
5
1
15
0
I also tried every solution that I found on the internet for solving the stutter/input lag/frame drops problem before reinstalling my OS:

  • reinstalled graphic drivers with DDU
  • reinstalled audio & LAN drivers
  • sfc scan
  • chkdsk
  • disabled fast boot
  • power plan settings changed or restored to default etc...
Nothing helped.

In Event Viewer - Windows Logs - System - I have 4 critical errors: Kernel-Power 41 (63), don't know if it's related to my problem, tho.
 
I asked about battery/wall usage because under battery, your power draw and heat output will be less.

I see many complaints about gaming laptops not performing well.
Usually gaming while plugged in.
One common cause is thermal throttling.
Laptop coolers must, of necessity be small and light.
They are also relatively underpowered.
If you run an app such as HWMonitor or HWinfo, you will get the current, minimum, and maximum cpu temperatures.
For intel processors, if you see a max of 100c. it means you have throttled.
The cpu will lower it's multiplier and power draw to protect itself
until the situation reverses.

It is counter-intuitive, but, try changing the windows power profile advanced functions to a max of 90% instead of the default of 100%
You may not notice the reduced cpu performance.

If the power brick and the battery are the original ones, I would not worry about it.
I presume charging and battery operations are normal.
Hide the brick so you can't hear the noise.
 

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