FBI Investigating AP's Hacked Twitter Account

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MANOFKRYPTONAK

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Ha ha, why would you post something like that? seems kinda strange and not helpful at all. Hacking should be for a legitimate purpose IMHO. Some dill hole did one time try to take over my email account, so I got into his facebook and posted weird homoerotic comments, like, I think I love her but can't stop thinking about him... The replys were epic. Don't mess with other peoples stuff, just to mess.
 

dalethepcman

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Pay no attention to the man behind the curtains. There is no reason for anyone to post this type of false information without some kind of agenda. The only agenda I can see related to this is getting CISPA passed and taking away more freedoms. Call me a conspiracy theorist if you want, but its the only dot that I can connect to this.
 

DRosencraft

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This is exactly the problem. One person does something stupid, and the response is equally if not more ignorant or stupid. There is no such thin as "legitimate" hacking, by anyone. Hackers fall into three categories; curious people testing/experimenting with their computer skills, malicious pranksters, and criminals. The first don't do anything; they break in, snoop around, and leave. They don't record anything, they don't disseminate anything, they just look around. It's still illegal, but you're not gonna waste too much time worrying about them (like the kid trespassing on your lawn). The malicious pranksters like to do stupid stunts. This is like LulzSec - defacing websites just because they don't like someone. Also still criminal, but about on the level a graffiti artist or a vandal.

The last ones are the biggest problem. They're like the ones from yesterday, who cause major disruptions, cause some chaos, etc. They are individuals, groups, or governments who hack vital services, business and commerce websites, to steal data or disrupt normal activities.

No matter the case, "hack them back" is not an effective answer. You treat them like you do with comparable crimes; trespassing in someone's computer should be the same as trespassing in someone's home or business. Vandalizing someone's website should be treated the same as vandalizing their business. I hope everyone gets the point.
 

chumly

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I like how this news coincides with the freedom-taking legislation they are trying to pass. Sounds like manipulative news to me.
 

dalethepcman

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Thats basically what I was talking about Chumly. Sadly the government and corporation already found a way to circumvent privacy laws whether or not CISPA is passed.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57581161-38/u.s-gives-big-secret-push-to-internet-surveillance/
 
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