FCC Says Go for 'Super Wi-Fi' – Wi-Fi on Steriods

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otoh, what about the new problem: picking up every router for miles and having to search for yours in the list.

It would have to be limited. With that said, someone's bound to set up a giant nationwide wifi subscription network where you can access the internet from anywhere without any special cards or devices through your normal wifi connection. As long as they get a handle on dealing with network congestion, I'm all for it.
 

Trueno07

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This would be awesome for universities. Currently they run many many extenders all linked together, but imagine one router at the center of, say, a dorm quad or academic quad of some sort.
 

eklipz330

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this would be great in the city, and in colleges

but my college is messed up... the students take off the antennae from the back of the computers, so it can't access the internet.. smh
 

8086

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This is such bull-crud. The TV spectrum was freed up so it could be used for emergency services. Our government has sold us out. We all must write to out government and let them know they must keep their promises and protect lives.
 

WarraWarra

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Great, nice to see they caught up with the rest of the world.

Okay so why not just use one of these for 200miles / 320km upto 108 Mbps connections ?

LOL been there done that. Normal in Africa now arrived in USA via FCC finally.

http://www.netkrom.com/prod_multi-band_backhaul_dual_radio.html
* Multiple unlicensed and licensed bands from 180MHz to 6.1GHz (Choose the Frequency You Need!)
* Data transfer rate up to 108 Mbps
* Work as Base Station, HotSpot AP, Mesh AP, Wireless Client, Backhaul and Repeater
* High power modules up to 1 Watt for long distance links up to 200 miles or 320 Km.
* Long distance parameters and output power regulation
* High CPU power for high-speed connection
* Perfect design and characteristics for industrial outdoor use (waterproof)
* Complete compatibility with any IEEE network and WiMAX
* Advanced network functions (IP Routing, Firewall, DHCP, NAT, Bandwidth Management, QoS, etc)
* Advanced security features WEP (64,128 bit), WPA1 & WPA2, AES.
* Free NETKROM NMS - Network Management System
* Carrier class radio for extreme environment -60 to 230C
* Robust and Efficient MAC Layer
* High packets per Second Performance
* High TX Power and RX Sensitivity
 

WarraWarra

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[citation][nom]amk09[/nom]This is amazing. 5-10 years down the road Wi-Fi will be as easy to get as a cellphone signal.[/citation]

Yup but GSM towers was last limited to effective 8km to 16km max in open areas so have to have lots of ugly towers closer to each other when in the mountains.
 

toastninja17

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Awwwhhh yeah man sweet! Thank you TV for going digital!! Kick ass too how it can better travel through walls and surfaces. And I can live with 15-20mbps. I don't usually get the peak in my area anyway. I just can't wait when this technology becomes commercially available to consumers, this is gonna rock!
 

Trueno07

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[citation][nom]Haserath[/nom]Now the Google cars don't have to drive down our street to get our info, thanks for helping our Google overlords take over faster.[/citation]

As long as apple, Microsoft, Google and Adobe join together I'm sure we'll be fine. (Adobe would ask everyone if they wanted to update)
 

back_by_demand

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In the UK there have been rumblings that when the old analogue TV signals are switched off to be replaced entirely with DVB, the old analogue transmitters could be used for internet. This seems like a step towards that idea.

There is a problem however, you get you signal from a huge transmitter on a hill about 20 miles away - how the hell are you going to get a signal back to acknowledge packets or to upload? I sure down fancy having a 200ft pylon on top the house. You would either need a dedicated hard line as well, just for uploading, or upload via cellphone towers.

Good idea so far, but it hasn't answered any questions yet, just presented new ones.
 

Mathos

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[citation][nom]back_by_demand[/nom]In the UK there have been rumblings that when the old analogue TV signals are switched off to be replaced entirely with DVB, the old analogue transmitters could be used for internet. This seems like a step towards that idea.There is a problem however, you get you signal from a huge transmitter on a hill about 20 miles away - how the hell are you going to get a signal back to acknowledge packets or to upload? I sure down fancy having a 200ft pylon on top the house. You would either need a dedicated hard line as well, just for uploading, or upload via cellphone towers.Good idea so far, but it hasn't answered any questions yet, just presented new ones.[/citation]

Actually It wouldn't be that bad... Have you ever used CB Radios? Those usually work well with a 3 foot whip antenna and have a range of close to 20 or 30 miles while in a moving vehicle. Plus obviously they don't require huge amounts of power output to work. Not to mention on a cloudy day with a lot of "skip" (bouncing signal off clouds) the range can go up to 200 miles. Note though that the freq's involved there are in the kHz range though.
 

spectrewind

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Each connected device will need to exist in it's own virtual sandbox. if this is not done, the security problems will be huge (think RPC exploit in Windows, for example).
 

liveonc

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Need more lead in the paint used in our homes. Not long before walking outdoors will either give you Cancer or cook your microwave dinners for you. ;-)
 

therabiddeer

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Sounds cool, but this brings back thoughts of Google's plan for net neutrality and things become suspicious...
http://www.tomsguide.com/us/Verizon-Goodle-Net-Neutrality-ISP,news-7735.html

A month ago: Wireless networks exempt from being net neutral (what constitutes a "wireless network"?)
Now: Google pushing to expand wireless even further.

I love the idea of wireless becoming more widespread, but if that wireless isnt protected it could spell trouble in the future.
 
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