Build Advice First Gaming PC - need advise pls :)

Jun 2, 2023
3
0
10
Hi,

I'm building my first gaming PC ever (console before) and after 3 weeks of research I would really appreciate some help/advice before the final buy (I only got the GPU so far). Here is my build so far with a few questions. I know it's an ITX build, which comes with some potential sacrifices but I saw some really good builds with this case with decent temperatures and no throttling and I would appreciate the portability and the small form factor. I decided for AM5 so far for more compatibility in the future. The purpose of the PC is gaming only, mainly in 2k and 4k (if possible with some less demanding games) with 60hz (monitor) and 100hz (TV). Thanks a lot in advance! :)

Case: Hyte Revolt 3
PSU: Cooler Master V SFX Gold
Motherboard: MSI MPG B650I EDGE or ASROCK? (or any other I didn't found?)
GPU: KFA2 RTX 4070 Ex Gamer (already got that one from a decent deal)
CPU: Ryzen 5 7600 (any need here to go bigger, e.g. Ryzen 7 7700? Next significant step in fps for gaming seems to be the Ryzen 7 7800X3d from benchmark videos I saw but it's also double the price. Sometimes I see very positives reviews about the temps of the 7600, sometimes different posts which state that it gets very hot.)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12S
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32GB DDR 5 (better options? Should be low profile because of the case)
SSD: 1 TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus M.2
Case Fans: 2x Noctua NF-A14

Depending the cooling situation I know the case has the potential for an AIO but I found this video
View: https://youtu.be/gEiCwr_WTig
with air cooling only with good temps and think I might get away with the additional case fans and the Noctua CPU air cooling.
Thanks in advance!
 
I would get a different PSU. I would go with the gigabyte motherboard. I would also get more storage for the initial build so if you find it lacking there is no need to rip open the ITX build later to install it. I would also pick up at least a 980 pro to make use of 4.0x4 speeds for an extra 10 dollars. Something like this;

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 7600 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12S 55.44 CFM CPU Cooler ($50.00)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B650I AORUS ULTRA Mini ITX AM5 Motherboard ($259.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws S5 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR5-6000 CL32 Memory ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 980 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P5 Plus 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($122.49 @ Amazon)
Video Card: KFA2 EX Gamer GeForce RTX 4070 12 GB Video Card (Purchased For $0.00)
Case: HYTE REVOLT 3 Mini ITX Tower Case ($129.00 @ HYTE)
Power Supply: Corsair SF750 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($160.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1127.43
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2023-06-02 12:56 EDT-0400
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
What you probably saw regarding Ryzen is that they allow the CPU to reach 95C before throttling starts. So they "run hot" but they are supposed to.

In the old days your mid-range CPUs with a mid-range cooler would comfortably sit in the 60-70 degree range and you would have to overclock to reach high temperatures. Now both Intel and AMD basically let the CPUs boost as high as possible for short durations. Gaming loads are generally lighter so you aren't likely to see the peak high temperatures people get when running benchmarks.
 
Jun 2, 2023
3
0
10
I would get a different PSU. I would go with the gigabyte motherboard. I would also get more storage for the initial build so if you find it lacking there is no need to rip open the ITX build later to install it. I would also pick up at least a 980 pro to make use of 4.0x4 speeds for an extra 10 dollars. Something like this;

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 7600 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12S 55.44 CFM CPU Cooler ($50.00)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B650I AORUS ULTRA Mini ITX AM5 Motherboard ($259.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws S5 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR5-6000 CL32 Memory ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 980 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P5 Plus 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($122.49 @ Amazon)
Video Card: KFA2 EX Gamer GeForce RTX 4070 12 GB Video Card (Purchased For $0.00)
Case: HYTE REVOLT 3 Mini ITX Tower Case ($129.00 @ HYTE)
Power Supply: Corsair SF750 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($160.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1127.43
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2023-06-02 12:56 EDT-0400
Thank you for your reply! :) I read that the SF750 is an all time favorite PSU. I just thought that 850W could be a better invest for the future? Also the SF750 is a bit expensive in Europe. The Cooler Master v850 v2 would be actually cheaper. Did you make bad experiences with this one? The first version seemed to be quite loud but I read that they fixed it these days?
 
Jun 2, 2023
3
0
10
What you probably saw regarding Ryzen is that they allow the CPU to reach 95C before throttling starts. So they "run hot" but they are supposed to.

In the old days your mid-range CPUs with a mid-range cooler would comfortably sit in the 60-70 degree range and you would have to overclock to reach high temperatures. Now both Intel and AMD basically let the CPUs boost as high as possible for short durations. Gaming loads are generally lighter so you aren't likely to see the peak high temperatures people get when running benchmarks.
Thank you, that indeed might explain what confused me at first. Is there an average value when GPUs start throttling?
 
D

Deleted member 2947362

Guest
Thank you, that indeed might explain what confused me at first. Is there an average value when GPUs start throttling?
If you don't use PBO It would most likely run cooler

PBO is AMD's own overclocking tool

From what I can make of it all AMD CPU's that come with Boost which the max the CPU can run under certain work loads Boost is really just over clocking the CPU in a safe way so it's not going to damage the CPU.

PBO just enables the CPU to hold the Boost clocks longer which is taking the CPU beyond it's warranty AMD warns you of this anyway so it's common knowledge.

So maybe if you don't enable PBO the CPU should/could run cooler if temps become an issue.

EDIT
sorry I was suppose to quote

"What you probably saw regarding Ryzen is that they allow the CPU to reach 95C before throttling starts. So they "run hot" but they are supposed to."
 
the revolt 3 supports 280 AIO, i would suggest using that.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 7600 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: EK AIO 280 D-RGB 116 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($93.88 @ Newegg Sellers)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B650I AORUS ULTRA Mini ITX AM5 Motherboard ($259.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z5 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR5-6000 CL36 Memory ($90.10 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 3.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($107.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: KFA2 EX Gamer White GeForce RTX 4070 12 GB Video Card (Purchased For $0.00)
Case: HYTE REVOLT 3 Mini ITX Tower Case w/700 W Power Supply ($128.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Phanteks Revolt SFX 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1009.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2023-06-05 02:19 EDT-0400

If you really dont want to use an AIO, try the Dark rock TF2 : https://pcpartpicker.com/product/GTpzK8/be-quiet-dark-rock-tf-2-cpu-cooler-bk031
 
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