[SOLVED] First OC - i7 6700k - Safe overclock

roNic

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Jul 13, 2016
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Hi guys,

A few years ago I bought a new rig with a i7 6700k and a MSI Z170A Pro gaming carbon motherboard. I've never had the need to OC the CPU, but now I'm kinda interested in the fps gain I can get in some games that are pretty CPU based.

Could you guys provide me with some vital info for my first OC? I really have some specific needs for this OC:

  1. I want to do a small OC (4,4/4,5Ghz?)
  2. I want to keep the voltage as low as possible since I also do a lot of office stuff for work on this PC. Can I keep stockvoltage?
The OC is more out of interest than actual performance gain as well. Are there any other things I need to concider?

Would be great if some of you could provide me with some help! :)
 
as for safe overcloking, there is none
This is just an untrue statement.

But isn't it most safe to take it verry slow as a newbie OCer as me?
Yes, absolutely, as I've suggested, and using the guide.

I'm curious if I can just try out 4,4Ghz with standard volts as well, or is this a step that has a lot of risk?
Again, yes, you can do this. Just make sure to test as you go a long. With regard to risk, unless you do something really silly, there is very little risk. But, when OC'ing, sometimes the settings you choose may not sit well with your system, and you could crash. At first sight, this can send someone into panic mode (I know! I've been there many moons ago). Most of the time, you just have to reset your bios or do a CMOS rest to get it back up and running. These things you may not know, and that's why following a guide is a great way to take away those moments of irrational panic, when your system doesn't respond the way you expect.
 
Reactions: roNic
overclocking is relatively easy
before you even start, make sure you have adequate CPU cooling
then just keep raising cpu frequency, once it gets unstable, increase voltage
as for safe overcloking, there is none, if you get out of factory clocks, ure loosing warranty if something goes wrong (unless u have paid intel protection plan)
 
overclocking is relatively easy
before you even start, make sure you have adequate CPU cooling
then just keep raising cpu frequency, once it gets unstable, increase voltage
as for safe overcloking, there is none, if you get out of factory clocks, ure loosing warranty if something goes wrong (unless u have paid intel protection plan)
Whilst your post isn't inaccurate, there is more to OC than just that. You need to test for stability, heat output, voltage etc. There is much more to getting a stable overclock, than pumping up either CPU speed or voltage.

To the OP. Read the guide Linked. Take it slow and handy and test all the way. If you want some kind of quick fix as highlighted above you will have an unstable OC, with likely random crashes, BSOD's.
 
Reactions: CompuTronix
BTW, every chip is different, and what OC you can achieve on one chip, doesn't mean you will get it on yours. This is known as the silicon lottery. Taking a pragmatic approach means you will get a stable OC, with sustainable, repeatable results.

You could be able to hit 4.4 on stock voltage. But you will only be able to know for sure, when you do it yoursself, following a guide or process that's logical, and gets your desired results.
 

roNic

Reputable
Jul 13, 2016
10
0
4,510
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overclocking is relatively easy
before you even start, make sure you have adequate CPU cooling
then just keep raising cpu frequency, once it gets unstable, increase voltage
as for safe overcloking, there is none, if you get out of factory clocks, ure loosing warranty if something goes wrong (unless u have paid intel protection plan)
I have one of the best air coolers (at that time). The Dark Rock 3 Pro. Going up higher than 4,4 / 4,5 should be possible with that cooler, I've been told.

Also, the warranty has probably expired by now. But isn't it most safe to take it verry slow as a newbie OCer as me?

I'm curious if I can just try out 4,4Ghz with standard volts as well, or is this a step that has a lot of risk?
 

roNic

Reputable
Jul 13, 2016
10
0
4,510
0
Whilst your post isn't inaccurate, there is more to OC than just that. You need to test for stability, heat output, voltage etc. There is much more to getting a stable overclock, than pumping up either CPU speed or voltage.

To the OP. Read the guide Linked. Take it slow and handy and test all the way. If you want some kind of quick fix as highlighted above you will have an unstable OC, with likely random crashes, BSOD's.
Does this also count for a small OC to 4,4Ghz? You got me tho. I do want a quick fix haha. Just to see what performance gain there will be compared to non OC.
 
Yes, it does. Even for a small OC.

OC'ing is actually fun (at least for me). But, IMO doing it the right way is the only way. You can try the easy way, and it may work. But it can be frustrating if your system keeps hanging or BSOD's as I mentioned.

You can of course simply change the multi, up to say 44 (4.4ghz) bump the voltage up a notch, and see how it goes. Going from 4.2 to 4.4 will only yield a few percent FPS increase gaming wise. It can be slightly more, but it's game dependant. But for certain productivity tasks the OC, would help. Even though it's only 200-300mhz difference. If you are encoding a movie for example, and at stock it does it 15 minutes, but with the OC it might do it in 14 minutes. If time is important, then that can be a big boost.

For gaming though, the increase is not that much. What specific tasks are you doing. If your work was sensitive/critical, then I would double down on doing the OC the right way.

Edit: if you follow the guide (read it a few times), you can get a stable OC with repeatable results, and a boost in performance (task dependant). It takes all of about 2 or 3 hours to do it right. Or 5 mins of doing it incorrectly and getting frustrated.
 
Reactions: CompuTronix
as for safe overcloking, there is none
This is just an untrue statement.

But isn't it most safe to take it verry slow as a newbie OCer as me?
Yes, absolutely, as I've suggested, and using the guide.

I'm curious if I can just try out 4,4Ghz with standard volts as well, or is this a step that has a lot of risk?
Again, yes, you can do this. Just make sure to test as you go a long. With regard to risk, unless you do something really silly, there is very little risk. But, when OC'ing, sometimes the settings you choose may not sit well with your system, and you could crash. At first sight, this can send someone into panic mode (I know! I've been there many moons ago). Most of the time, you just have to reset your bios or do a CMOS rest to get it back up and running. These things you may not know, and that's why following a guide is a great way to take away those moments of irrational panic, when your system doesn't respond the way you expect.
 
Reactions: roNic

roNic

Reputable
Jul 13, 2016
10
0
4,510
0
Thanks for the clear reply!

Today I read several articles regarding overclocking and think I'm ready to give it a spin.
I OC'd the CPU to 4.5Ghz @ 1.250 (seems to be running fine for now).

But I see that the 1.250 volts are constantly pushing even when idle, so I thought about trying something else. I want the system to be using low volts / power consumption when Idle and going to 4,5Ghz and using the volts when needed.

To fully understand what I had to do, I read some articles about Adapative Mode + Offset Mode. Sadly I still don't fully understand what settings I need to be using for this to be in a good spot.

Currently I have the following settings:

  • 4.5Ghz
  • Mode: Adaptive + Offset
  • Offset mode: Auto
  • Offset amount: Auto
I see that the volts are higher then 1.250 like I setup... I think it uses about 1.290 at max.
Could anyone explain how I can use a low volt when idle, but a set voltage @ 4.5Ghz? :)
 

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